Mover and shaker

MassChallenge Texas names former Houston Exponential leader as local exec

Jon Nordby, former exec at Houston Exponential, will lead the inaugural Houston MassChallenge cohort. Courtesy of MassChallenge

MassChallenge Texas in Houston, a zero-equity startup accelerator, has named its managing director. Jon Nordby, who recently served as Houston Exponential's director of strategy since its launch, will lead the organization's inaugural cohort.

"MassChallenge's not-for-profit, no equity model is uniquely suited to accelerate the development of Houston's innovation ecosystem and is the foundation early-stage startups need to get to the point of disruption or pivot as fast as possible," says Nordby in a release.

Before HX, Nordby served as vice president of talent and innovation at the Greater Houston Partnership, and was essential in creating the organization's Innovation Initiative.

"I was thrilled when MassChallenge established their first Texas office in 2017 and I'm excited to bring my experience leading Houston ecosystem efforts to attract founders from around the world and connect them with everything this city can offer, help them establish roots, and forge the partnerships they need for success," Nordby continues.

MassChallenge's first Houston cohort, which will accelerate 25 startups, begins in July. Applications are open until Friday, May 10, at noon.

The organization, which has locations around the world, looks for early stage startups that haven't raised more than $500,000 in equity-based funding and have generated less than $1 million in revenue over the past year. The selected startups will receive free GreenStreet office space, mentorship, investment opportunities, and more.

Also new to the team is Lauren Mitchell, who will serve as the local chapter's community manager. A native Houstonian, Mitchell comes from leading marketing and partnerships at Discovery Green. Yvette Casares Willis, who oversees statewide partnerships for the organization, is also based in Houston.

"MassChallenge Texas is providing innovation at scale in programs in Austin and Houston by connecting startups to resources throughout this great state," says Mike Millard, managing director of MassChallenge Texas, in the release. "The addition of Jon to our team will accelerate our pace in the state and advance our mission by connecting startups to deep industry resources and expertise that are available to startups in Houston."

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Building Houston

 
 

According to a new report, Houston's workforce isn't among the happiest in the nation. Photo via Getty Images

Call it the Bayou City Blues. A report from job website Lensa ranks Houston third among the U.S. cities with the unhappiest workers.

The report looks at four factors — vacation days taken, hours worked per week, average pay, and overall happiness — to determine the happiest and unhappiest cities for U.S. workers.

Lensa examined data for 30 major cities, including Dallas and San Antonio. Dallas appears at the top of the list of the cities with the unhappiest workers, and San Antonio lands at No. 8.

Minneapolis ranks first among the cities with the happiest workers.

Here's how Houston fared in the four ranking categories:

  • 16.6 million unused vacation days per year.
  • 40.1 average hours worked per week.
  • Median annual pay of $32,251.
  • Happiness score of out of 50.83.

Dallas had 19.4 million unused vacation days per year, 40.5 average hours worked per week, median annual pay of $34,479, and a happiness score of 53.3 out of 100.

Meanwhile, San Antonio had 5.7 million unused vacation days per year, 39.2 average hours worked per week, median annual pay of $25,894, and a happiness score of 48.61.

Texas tops Lensa's list of the states with the unhappiest workers.

"While the Lone Star State had a decent happiness score of 52.56 out of 100, it scored poorly on each of the other factors, with Texans allowing an incredible 67.1 million earned vacation days go to waste over the course of a year," Lensa says.

In terms of general happiness, Houston shows up at No. 123 on WalletHub's most recent list of the happiest U.S. cities. Dallas takes the No. 104 spot, and San Antonio lands at No. 141. Fremont, California, grabs the No. 1 ranking.

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