From work to workout

Life Time reveals details of first Houston coworking space

Houston snags only the third location of Life Time Work. It opens in City Centre early next year. Courtesy of Life Time

Houston is just the third city to be chosen to have a location of Minnesota-based Life Time's new coworking center. Life Time Work should be open in early 2019 in City Centre Five, adjacent to Life Time Athletic.

The first Life Time Work opened in Pennsylvania, and the second will open just outside of Minneapolis ahead of Houston's location in early 2019. Other locations are expected to be announced in the next five years, according to a release.

"We all have seen the impact of technology advancements and other changes influencing how work gets done. However, workspaces haven't adapted nearly enough to address this evolution," says Bahram Akradi, founder, chairman, and CEO of Life Time.

The 25,000-square-foot City Centre space will have both private and open-plan office space with 48 rentable offices and conference rooms, phone rooms, and open meeting space.

Life Time Work has three types of memberships — private office, reserved desk, or access to the lounge. Members have access to events, food, and coffee. The coworking space also boasts month to month membership, Herman Miller furniture, unlimited wifi, and printing, copying, scanning, and shredding services.

Pick your poison

Courtesy of Life Time

Coworkers can choose from one of three memberships, depending on whether they want a private office, a desk, or just access to the lounge.

When it comes to venture capital invested in the first quarter of 2019, Houston raked in less than 10 percent of what Austin reported, but the state as a whole has seen an increase, according to Crunchbase. Getty Images

While the state marked significant growth in first quarter venture capital investments year over year, Houston fell far behind its Texas sister cities. Houston startups received just 10 percent of what Austin startups reported, and Houston lost its lead it's had on Dallas for two quarters, according to Crunchbase data.

Texas had a reported $790.4 million in Q1, per Crunchbase, which is up from Q4 2018's $530.6 million as well as being up year over year from $587.2 million in Q1 of 2018. The number of deals for the state was cut almost by half — 64 Q1 2019 deals compared to 118 in Q1 of 2018 — "indicating larger investment sizes as the state's startup market continues to mature," according to Crunchbase's Mary Ann Azevedo.

Meanwhile in Houston, the city's startups received $44.7 million of that reported investment last quarter, which is down from the $121.4 million reported in Q4 2018. Austin raked in $493.8 million — more than 10 times that of Houston — and Dallas reported $245.4 million, which more than doubles what they reported for Q4 of 2018.

Houston lost its lead it had on Dallas for the past two quarters. In Q4 of 2018, Houston outdid Dallas with $121 million in venture capital investment, according to Crunchbase. Before that, Houston crushed Dallas in the third quarter too with $138.8 million compared to Dallas' $38.1 million. That quarter was when Houston came close to Austin's VC funding.

The largest deal in Houston was for biotech startup, Solugen, which closed its $13 million Series A in March, Cruncbase reported, and Y Combinator contributed to the round.

The Crunchbase report mentioned a few huge deals that tipped the scale this time around for Austin and Dallas. Dallas-based Peloton Therapeutics closed a $150 million Series E round in February. In Austin, Disco — a company founded in Houston but relocated to Austin — closed a $83 million Series E round, and Austin's Billd drew in $60 million in a Series A.

Houston's cut shrinks

Houston's piece of the Texas VC pie continues to shrink. In Q3 2018, the city had a third of the funds and, in Q4, had over 20 percent.Via Crunchbase News

Dallas is back at No. 2

Dallas came back with a vengeance after being outdone by Houston for the past two quarters.Via Crunchbase News