boss up

Gerald D. Hines' granddaughter named new co-CEO of global real estate powerhouse

Laura Hines-Pierce, 38, is the new co-CEO with her father Jeff Hines. Photo courtesy of Hines

A global real estate juggernaut now has a new — and familiar — face in the executive office. Hines announced that Laura Hines-Pierce has been promoted to co-CEO, joining Jeff Hines, her father.

This move makes Hines-Pierce, 38, one of the youngest CEOs of a major real estate organization and one of only a few women in an often male-dominated industry.

Hines-Pierce was most recently Hines’ senior managing director in the office of the CEO since 2020, and before that, served as the firm’s transformation officer. She is credited with building the investment management platform that launched three flagship funds across the U.S. and Asia with a total current investment capacity of $4.8 billion in equity, translating to $10.8 billion in purchasing power.

Other work included integrated innovation into all areas of the business and further defined the firm’s ESG commitments, per press materials.

While serving as the firm’s transformation officer, Hines-Pierce worked with the co-heads of investment management, the global chief investment officer, and the CEO of capital markets, to refine investment strategy and acquisition efforts.

On-the-ground and grassroots work also included serving as project manager for River Point, a one-million-square-foot development in Chicago. She was also part of the OneHines Women’s Network, which focused on the company’s diversity and inclusion.

Before her Hines tenure, Hines-Pierce worked for Sotheby’s in New York. She graduated from Duke University with a BA in Economics and Art History and received her MBA from Harvard University, per her bio.

As far as next steps, Hines is keeping it in the family: plans include Hines-Pierce’s two brothers, Adam and Matthew Hines, who are expected to join her and Jeff in the office of the CEO.

“I’m proud to become co-CEO and continue the momentum we’re experiencing across the board at Hines,” said Hines-Pierce in a statement. “My father has been the catalyst for our global expansion and growth over the past three decades and I’m excited to partner with him at this pivotal moment for the firm. The pace of innovation in real estate is finally catching up with other industries; my primary focus has always been – and continues to be – positioning Hines at the forefront of those changes.”

Hines is the brainchild of real estate icon Gerald D. Hines, who passed away in 2020 at the age of 95. Gerald Hines engineered his fledgling firm from an entrepreneurial startup in Houston in 1957 into an international powerhouse that has developed, owned, and managed some of the world’s most recognizable architectural landmarks across five continents. The firm boasts nearly 1,500 buildings in 255 cities in 27 countries and some $84 billion in assets.

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This article originally ran on CultureMap.

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Building Houston

 
 

Nancy and Rich Kinder gifted $50M to their eponymous center. Photo courtesy

Houston’s most generous couple has once again gifted a massive sum to a local institution. Rich and Nancy Kinder’s Kinder Foundation has donated $50 million to Rice University’s Kinder Institute for Urban Research, the organization announced.

The Kinder's generous grant will assist the institute’s focus on what it dubs “inclusive prosperity” — that is, “ensuring that everyone can contribute to Houston's success and share in its opportunities.”

This new grant follows the approximately $30 million he Kinder Foundation previously gifted Rice’s Kinder Institute and its affiliates to facilitate its headquarters.

“Over the past decade, the Kinder Institute has played an integral role in shaping Houston,” said Rich Kinder, chairman of the Kinder Foundation. “However, we can do more to inform and more directly address the challenges our communities face, particularly in the areas of housing, education, economic mobility, health and population research.”

To that end, the Kinders’ funds will ensure the institute can assist its partners regardless of their ability to pay for research. Funds will also help the institute respond to community research needs quickly during times of crisis — such as a catastrophic storm or pandemic — when funds aren’t readily available.

Kinder Institute director Ruth López Turley calls the grant “a gift to all of Houston,” speaking to the institute’s work to improve lives through data, research, engagement and action.

“Inclusive prosperity doesn’t just happen spontaneously,” she noted in a statement. “It requires an explicit effort informed by research. Lots of organizations are working hard to make things better, but most of them have very limited research capacity, and that’s what the Kinder Institute is primed to do.”

Founded in 2010, the institute has evolved into a leader in research, data, and policy analysis of critical issues such as housing, transportation, and education. The institute also releases the familiar Kinder Houston Area Survey, which charts significant changes in the way area residents perceive and understand Houston’s ongoing challenges and opportunities.

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This article originally ran on CultureMap.

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