HOUSTON INNOVATORS PODCAST EPISODE 32

Startup founder sees 'the waves are hitting the shore' for Houston innovation ecosystem

Joe Alapat is the CEO of Houston-based Liongard, which just raised a $17 million series B round. Courtesy of Liongard

Last week, Houston-based software-as-a-service startup, Liongard, announced the closing of its $17 million series B fundraising round, ending what was a bit of a dry spell for Houston venture capital investment caused by COVID-19's effect on the economy.

But for Liongard's CEO Joe Alapat, who co-founded the company with COO Vincent Tran in 2015, the round was the result of ongoing relationships with advisers and investors that meant a successful round — even in light of a pandemic.

"The process for us with the series B was much like our seed or series A round. We chose to communicate early and keep in touch with the investment community," Alapat says on this week's episode of the Houston Innovators Podcast, and he shares his experience as an example to other startups looking to raise venture capital investment.

"Communicate early and share progress, so that when you get to the point when you are looking for an investment, it's not a fresh start. It's a continuation of that conversation."

With the money, Liongard will gear up for growth, expanding its teams and getting the word out on the value the company is providing.

"The purpose for raising this money is really to advance our growth, accelerate what we've done with our platform to continue to execute on our mission, and really serve our customers on a higher degree," Alapat says.

In the episode, Alapat also shares his advice for Houston startups looking to tap into the Houston innovation ecosystem — something he's watched grow over the past five years. Now, he says, when it comes to new startups in Houston, "the waves are hitting the shore."

"Houston has always been an entrepreneurial city, and this is just that next stage," Alapat says on the episode. "For me, it's the technology side that excites me even more to see technology companies really succeeding."

Listen to the full interview with Alapat below — or wherever you get your podcasts — and subscribe for weekly episodes.


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Building Houston

 
 

Some 49 percent of Houston workers are burned out at work. Getty Images

Local workers who're especially dreading that commute or cracking open the laptop in the morning aren't alone. A new study reveals that nearly half of Houston laborers are more burned out on the job.

Some 49 percent of Bayou City residents report to be burned out at work, according to employment industry website Robert Half. That's significantly higher than last year, when only 37 percent reported burnout in a similar poll.

Meanwhile, more than one in four Houston workers (28 percent) say that they will not unplug from work when taking time off this summer.

Not surprisingly, American workers are ready for a vacation. Per a press release, the research also reveals:

  • One in four workers lost or gave up paid time off in 2020
  • One in three plans to take more than three weeks of vacation time this year

Elsewhere in Texas, the burnout is real. In Dallas, 50 percent of workers report serious burnout. More than a quarter — 26 percent — of Dallasites fear they won't disconnect from the office during summer vacation.

In fun-filled Austin, 45 percent of the workforce complain of burnout. Some 32 percent of Austinites feel they can unplug from work during the summer.

Fortunately for us, the most burned-out city in the U.S. isn't in the Lone Star State. That dubious title goes to the poor city of Charlotte, North Carolina, where 55 percent of laborers are truly worn out.

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This article originally ran on CultureMap.

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