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Houston's smart pillbox startup gets even smarter about its users with data tracking technology

EllieGrid, the smart pillbox, is using user data to ensure medicine compliance. EllieGrid/Instagram

What if your pillbox was enabled to use technology to not only notify you to take your medicine, but also predict when you might be likely to miss a dosage. For Houston-based EllieGrid, this hypothetical situation isn't too far from reality.

EllieGrid reimagines the normal pillbox. Rather than sorting your medicine into days and times, which can take a good amount of time, you sort your medicine in its own compartments. Then, once you've programmed the free app with your medicine schedule, you get notifications to your phone when it's time to take your pills. EllieGrid's compartments light up to indicate which medicine to take and how many pills.

"What's really neat about EllieGrid is that we are starting to learn users' habits as days go by, so that we can trigger alarms at optimal times," says co-founder and CEO Abe Matamoros at The Cannon's female entrepreneurs pitch night.

If a user needs to take their medicine between 8 and 10 a.m. every day, the alarm might go off earlier during the week, and later in that bracket of time on the weekends, according to when the user tends to wake up.

While convenient, EllieGrid's ability to track users' compliance actually adds even more value to the company's product — as do the monthly surveys users are invited to take, which helps the company get to know their user and their medical profile.

"We realize that most people go to the doctor once every six months, but a lot can happen during that time," Matamoros says. "But if they get used to this monthly dialogue, that's extremely valuable. And by combining these things, we can really decrease the probability that they stop taking their medicine."

Insurance companies pay pharmacists up to $60 to call patients who haven't picked up their medicine within 30 to 60 days, Matamoros says. But EllieGrid can tell if users failed to take their medication the day of and can notify the user or their family members — and even insurance companies — with much more immediacy.

The startup has seen a growing interest from major players in the retail sector. At the Consumer Technology Association's Consumer Electronics Show in early January, EllieGrid co-founder, Regina Vatterott, says the company received market validation and interest from a few international health-related retail companies. Now, the Houston-based team, which has in the past focused on direct-to-consumer sales, is looking to solidify its infrastructure and supply chain to make sure it can fulfill potential B-to-B orders.

In an interview last year, Vatterott told InnovationMap that the bigger picture that her and her co-founders are trying to do is transform traditional medical devices into consumer-focused health accessories.

"We want to do more and more with medical devices because we think that people are always people before they are patients," Vatterott says.

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Building Houston

 
 

Comcast’s Internet Essentials program announced the a donation of a $30,000 financial grant and 1,000 laptops to SERJobs. Photo courtesy of Comcast

A Houston organization focused on helping low-income communities by providing access to education, training, and employment has received a new donation.

Comcast’s Internet Essentials program announced the a donation of a $30,000 financial grant and 1,000 laptops to SERJobs. The gift is part of a new partnership with SERJobs that's aimed at educating and equipping adults with technical skills, including training on Microsoft Office and professional development.

“SERJobs is excited to celebrate 10 years of Comcast's Internet Essentials program,” says Sheroo Mukhtiar, CEO, SERJobs, in a news release. “The Workforce Development Rally highlights the importance of digital literacy in our increasingly virtual world—especially as technology and the needs of our economy evolve. We are grateful to Comcast for their ongoing partnership and support of SERJobs’ and our members.”

For 10 years Comcast's Internet Essentials program has connected more than 10 million people to the Internet at home — most for the first time. This particular donation is a part of Project UP, Comcast’s comprehensive initiative to advance digital equity.

“Ten years is a remarkable milestone, signifying an extraordinary amount of work and collaboration with our incredible community partners across Houston,” says Toni Beck, vice president of external affairs at Comcast Houston, in the release.

“Together, we have connected hundreds of thousands of people to the power of the Internet at home, and to the endless opportunity, education, growth, and discovery it provides," she continues. "Our work is not done, and we are excited to partner with SERJobs to ensure the next generation of leaders in Houston are equipped with the technical training they need to succeed in an increasingly digital world.”

It's not the first time the tech company has supported Houston's low-income families. This summer, Comcast's Internet Essentials program and Region 4 Education Service Center partnered with the Texas Education Agency's Connect Texas Program to make sure Texas students have access to internet services.

Additionally, Comcast set up an internet voucher program with the City of Houston last December, and earlier this year, the company announced 50 Houston-area community centers will have free Wi-Fi connections for three years. Earlier this year, the company also dedicated $1 million to small businesses struggling due to the pandemic that are owned by Black, Indigenous, and People of Color.

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