Up and coming

Houston named a top city for emerging life sciences market

Houston, home to the largest medical center in the world, was ranked the second in the nation for emerging life science clusters. Photo by Dwight C. Andrews/Greater Houston Convention and Visitors Bureau

From a real estate and employment perspective, Houston is the second in the nation for emerging life sciences market, according to a new report.

CBRE released the top 10 cities for life sciences, as well as nine cities that have seen recent growth in the industry. While the Northeast and California dominated the list of the established markets, three Texas cities took top spots on the emerging list. Austin ranked behind Houston at No. 3 and the Dallas/Fort Worth area claimed the No. 7 spot. The top emerging life science cluster was the Seattle area.

The ranking was based on each metro's three-year growth in life sciences employment, National Institutes of Health funding, life science educational opportunities, number of medical research and health-services institutions, and the amount of high-tech workers.

"We've watched the life sciences sector for quite a few years in Houston as it steadily grew, but within the past few years it has grown exponentially," says CBRE Houston's First Vice President Scott Carter in a release. "TMC3 is obviously going to be a catalyst for continued growth in life sciences."

The growth within the industry has translated from employees and research to real estate, and Carter says CBRE currently has the 224,931-square-foot Texas A&M ALKEK building on the market — most of the facility is laboratory space.

"There has been substantial interest from investors in the top established life science markets," he continues. "They recognize Houston as an emerging market and see the value of placing capital in the Houston area."

The country's venture capital funding for the industry increased 86 percent last year to $15.8 billion, and, according to the release, the lab space under construction in the top five metros for life science growth expanded 101 percent last year to 6 million square feet.

"Multiple indicators point to sustained, strong growth for the life sciences industry, which makes life sciences labs and offices an ideal focus for developers and investors," says Steve Purpura, vice chairman leading CBRE's life sciences business. "Few industries offer this much expansion potential, but much of the activity happens in a select number of special markets."

Via the CBRE report

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Building Houston

 
 

Emily Cisek, CEO and co-founder of The Postage, joins the Houston Innovators Podcast to discuss tech optimizing after-life planning, B-to-C startup challenges, and a national expansion. Photo courtesy of The Postage

Anyone who's ever lost a loved one knows how stressful the process can be. Not only are you navigating your own grief, but you're bombarded with decisions you have to make. And if that loved one wasn't prepared — as most aren't — then the process is more overwhelming than it needs to be.

On top of that, Emily Cisek realized — through navigating three family deaths back to back — how archaic of a process it was. Rather than wait and see if anything changed, Cisek jumped on the market opportunity.

"I just knew there had to be a better way, and that's why I started The Postage," Cisek, co-founder and CEO of the Houston-based company, says on this week's episode of the Houston Innovators Podcast. "My background had historically been in bringing offline businesses online, and I started doing some research on how I could make this space better. At the time, there really wasn't anything out there."

The tech-enabled platform allows users of all ages to plan for their demise in every way — from saving and sharing memories when the time comes to organizing pertinent information for the loved ones left behind. And, as of last month, users can no generate their own last will and testament.

"We launched the online will maker — it wasn't in my roadmap for another six months or so — because every single person that was coming in was looking at something else on our platform, but then going to the will part and asking, 'Hey is this something I can create here?'" Cisek says.

Recognizing that this was a good opportunity to generate new users, Cisek quickly added on the feature for a flat $75 fee. Then, members pay $3.99 a month to be able to edit their will whenever they need to and also receive access to everything else on the platform.

Cisek saw a huge opportunity to grow with the pandemic, which put a spotlight after-life planning. The silver lining of it all was that more people were discussing after-life planning with their family members.

"We're having more open dialogue about life and end-of-life planning that I don't see any other scenario really bringing that to light," she explains. "In some ways, it's been positive because having the conversation with people has been easier than it had been before."

While anyone can access The Postage's platform, Cisek says she's focused on getting the word out nationally. Following some imminent funding and partnerships, national marketing and growth campaigns are on the horizon.

Cisek shares more on her career and he unique challenges she faces as a B-to-C entrepreneur on the podcast. Listen to the full interview below — or wherever you stream your podcasts — and subscribe for weekly episodes.


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