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Houston expert: 4 things female founders should know before starting a business

In observance of Women’s Entrepreneurship Day on November 19, here are four key considerations for women who want to start their own businesses. Photo via Getty Images

Almost four years ago my business partner and I started Volante Integrated Planning, a Houston-based office of Northwestern Mutual focused on comprehensive financial planning. I always aspired to run a business; however, I knew there were many factors to consider before making that leap.

According to the 2022 Northwestern Mutual Great Realization survey, 24 percent of respondents say they want to start a new business in the next two years. While starting your own business sounds appealing, leaving your current job and becoming an entrepreneur can be a difficult transition and it’s no secret that women have to approach our career paths differently than men.

As I recognize there is no one-size-fits-all approach to starting and managing your own business, I wanted to share a few valuable lessons and key takeaways that I learned from my own experience:

1. Seek advice and counsel

When it comes to starting your own business, it’s important to go through the proper financial and legal steps. In order to do this, there are three people you should consider developing a relationship with. The first is a financial planner who can assist you in growing your business by creating a budget and finding ways to leverage your current assets to set you up for long-term success. The second is a Certified Public Accountant who has experience in your industry to help you navigate the unique intricacies of being a business owner. Lastly, an attorney who can help you draw up the necessary documents and think through what needs to be included to protect you and your family.

2. Build your team

You will always need a support system and business team to lean on no matter how much experience you have in your industry or in running a business. I knew early on that I wanted to partner with someone to make it more fun and add higher value to our clients. Before launching our business partnership, we went through varying business cycles together to ensure we would mesh well, from a value standpoint, both financially and personally. This business “courtship” is critical to ensure you build the kind of trust needed. It is also important to develop the culture and values you want for your business first and choose partners or team members that align with those values.

3. Don’t be afraid to be authentic

People are drawn to authenticity rather than if you try to fit into a box, which is why it’s important to stay true to yourself in all aspects of your business. By being your true, authentic self, you can put a plan in place to start a business that is a reflection of your values and morals. If being a working mom is a part of your identity, don’t be afraid to make that known to the team. There is nothing that says you have to start a business a certain way, so make it yours and own it.

4. Give yourself grace

As women, we have a tendency to want to do it all, but it’s important to give yourself grace and be intentional with how you prioritize your time. There are certain life factors and considerations that ultimately influence how women prepare for their financial futures, especially when it comes to running a business. If starting or managing your business is the priority at the time, it’s OK to let your social life or fitness routine, for example, take the back burner for a period of time.

Being a female business owner has its challenges, but it is also extremely rewarding. If you’re considering starting your own business, it’s important to remember to stay true to yourself and do your due diligence to prepare for whatever unique challenges may be thrown your way.

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Jennifer Steil is a Houston-based Northwestern Mutual wealth management adviser.

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Building Houston

 
 

According to a new report, Houston is one of the top cities for funding for sustainability companies. Photo via Getty Images

From a financial standpoint, Houston appears to be a sustainable environment for sustainability-focused startups.

An analysis by PromoLeaf, a retailer of sustainable promotional products, finds that Houston ranks fourth among U.S. cities for the average funding raised by locally based startups in the sustainability sector, according to Crunchbase data.

Per the report, the Bayou City attracts $150.7 million in sustainability funding for startups. Ahead of Houston are Salt Lake City with $204.5 million; Santa Monica, California, with $154.3 million; and Fremont, California, with $153.4 million.

PromoLeaf’s analysis features cities where at least 20 companies are focused on sustainability.

The analysis indicates Houston has 20.6 sustainability startups per 100,000 residents. Ranking first in that regard is Boulder, Colorado (115 per 100,000 residents).

While Houston trails Boulder by a long distance, it fares well among the Texas cities in the analysis:

  1. Austin, 26.2 sustainability startups per 100,000 residents
  2. Houston, 20.6 sustainability startups per 100,000 residents
  3. Midland, 18.8 sustainability startups per 100,000 residents
  4. Plano, 11.9 sustainability startups per 100,000 residents
  5. Dallas, 11 sustainability startups per 100,000 residents
  6. Fort Worth, 5.3 sustainability startups per 100,000 residents
  7. San Antonio, 5.2 sustainability startups per 100,000 residents

PromoLeaf says more than 21,600 sustainability startups operate in the U.S. They’re in the renewable energy, recycling and pollution control, environmental engineering, green consumer goods, and environmental consulting industries.

The analysis shows Houston has:

  • 13.7 renewable energy startups per 100,000 residents
  • 5.8 recycling and pollution control startups per 100,000 residents
  • 3.5 environmental engineering startups per 100,000 residents
  • 2.9 environmental consulting startups per 100,000 residents
  • 0.70 green consumer goods startups per 100,000 residents

According to the Greater Houston Partnership, renewable energy startups leading Houston’s energy transformation include Energy Transition Ventures, Fysikes Biosolutions, Ionada, Katz Water Technologies, Pressure Corp., and Renewell Energy.

“A dynamic business climate combined with growth in venture capital funding in Houston has created fertile ground for companies of all stages aiming to power our world through the global energy transition,” the partnership says. “As the Energy Capital of the World, Houston has become a hub for startups and venture capital firms investing in the region’s energy future.”

Outside the energy sector, Houston startups like Trendy Seconds also are making their mark in sustainability. The company runs an online marketplace where women can find preowned clothing or shop for new clothing from sustainable brands.

“Our ultimate goal is to make responsible consumption super easy,” Maria Burgos, founder of Trendy Seconds, told InnovationMap last year.

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