money moves

Houston fintech unicorn raises $300M in series C

Last year, HighRadius became Houston's first unicorn — a privately held startup valued at over $1 billion. Now, the fintech company has raised more funds. Image via HighRadius.com

Houston's first "unicorn," fintech company HighRadius, is growing up fast.

On March 30, HighRadius, a software-as-a-service (SaaS) business, reported it raised a $300 million Series C round of funding that values the company at $3.1 billion. D1 Capital Partners and Tiger Global Management led the round, with participation from existing investors ICONIQ Growth and Susquehanna Growth Equity. Also contributing to the round were four high-profile entrepreneurs:

  • Frank Slootman, chairman and CEO of Snowflake, a cloud-computing company based in San Mateo, California. Both D1 Capital and Tiger Global invested in Snowflake, which went public in September.
  • Michael Scarpelli, chief financial officer of Snowflake.
  • Tooey Courtemanche, CEO of Carpinteria, California-based Procore Technologies, which produces software for management of construction projects. D1 Capital and Tiger Global are investors in Procore.
  • Howie Liu, co-founder and CEO of Airtable, a cloud-based collaboration platform based in San Francisco. D1 Capital is among Airtable's investors.

In a news release, HighRadius says it will spend the money to fuel product development and expand its global reach.

The $300 million funding round comes nearly 15 months after HighRadius announced it raised $125 million in a Series B round that catapulted it to unicorn status. In the fundraising world, a unicorn refers to a startup valued at $1 billion or more.

HighRadius, based in West Houston, was founded in 2006. It employs more than 1,000 people around the world. The HighRadius website listed 16 job openings as of March 30, with 10 of them in Houston.

HighRadius' AI-powered SaaS offering streamlines accounts-receivable and cash-management processes. For instance, HighRadius' Cash Application software relies on AI to comb through documents like emails and invoices to automatically match incoming payments with customer accounts. The company has over 600 customers, including more than 200 of the Forbes Global 2000.

"Our goal has always been to build a long-lasting business that outlasts all of us," Sashi Narahari, founder and CEO of HighRadius, says in the news release. "I look forward to working with [our] high-quality, long-term investors, who share a common vision of transforming the office of the CFO using a combination of artificial intelligence built on top of connected-finance workspaces and embedded analytics."

In the news release, Daniel Sundheim, founder of New York City-based D1 Capital, says CFOs and their teams have historically relied on antiquated methods to handle accounts receivable and cash management.

"HighRadius is in the opening innings of defining the next big software market for the office of the CFO," John Curtius, a partner at New York City-based Tiger Global, says in the news release. "HighRadius bears all of the signs of being a category-defining business for order-to-cash automation."

Trending News

Building Houston

 
 

For over a year now, scientists have been testing wastewater for COVID-19. Now, the public can access that information. Photo via Getty Images

In 2020, a group of researchers began testing Houston's wastewater to collect data to help identify trends at the community level. Now, the team's work has been rounded up to use as an online resource.

The Houston Health Department and Rice University launched the dashboard on September 22. The information comes from samples collected from the city's 39 wastewater treatment plants and many HISD schools.

"This new dashboard is another tool Houstonians can use to gauge the situation and make informed decisions to protect their families," says Dr. Loren Hopkins, chief environmental science officer for the health department and professor in the practice of statistics at Rice University, in a news release. "A high level of virus in your neighborhood's wastewater means virus is spreading locally and you should be even more stringent about masking up when visiting public places."

The health department, Houston Water, Rice University, and Baylor College of Medicine originally collaborated on the wastewater testing. Baylor microbiologist Dr. Anthony Maresso, director of BCM TAILOR Labs, led a part of the research.

"This is not Houston's first infectious disease crisis," Maresso says in an earlier news release. "Wastewater sampling was pioneered by Joseph Melnick, the first chair of Baylor's Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology, to get ahead of polio outbreaks in Houston in the 1960s. This work essentially ushered in the field of environmental virology, and it began here at Baylor. TAILOR Labs is just continuing that tradition by providing advanced science measures to support local public health intervention."

It's an affordable way to track the virus, says experts. People with COVID-19 shed viral particles in their feces, according to the release, and by testing the wastewater, the health department can measure important infection rate changes.

The dashboard, which is accessible online now, is color-coded by the level of viral load in wastewater samples, as well as labeled with any recent trend changes. Houstonians can find the interactive COVID-19 wastewater monitoring dashboard, vaccination sites, testing sites, and more information at houstonemergency.org/covid19.

Trending News