Money moves

Houston investor group backs growing logistics automation startup emerging from stealth

GOOSE has invested in a logistics automation startup that has just emerged from stealth-mode operations. Photo courtesy of Outrider

A Golden, Colorado-based logistics technology startup has emerged from stealth-mode operation aft two years of development to collect its recent $53 million investment that a Houston investor group contributed to.

Houston-based GOOSE has announced its participation in Outrider's recent raise, which included both a seed and series A round. The startup has created an autonomous yard operations tool for logistics purposes. The company also received investment from the likes of NEA, 8VC, Koch Disruptive Technologies, Fraser McCombs Capital, Prologis, Inc., Schematic Ventures, Loup Ventures, and more, according to a news release.

The goal of distribution yards is to keep semi-trailers full of freight moving quickly in the space between the warehouse doors and public roads. However, many of the processes that make up yard operations are manual, inefficient, and hazardous.

The current situation in logistics hubs is not optimized, and yard operations are ineffective and even hazardous.

"Logistics yards offer a confined, private-property environment and a set of discrete, repetitive tasks that make the ideal use case for autonomous technology," says Andrew Smith, founder and CEO of Outrider, in the release. "But today's yards are also complex, often chaotic settings, with lots of work that's performed manually. This is why an overarching systems approach – with an autonomous truck at its center – is key to automating every major operation in the yard."

Outrider's technology can automate repetitive and manual tasks, like moving trailers around, hitching and unhitching them, connecting and disconnecting trailer brake lines, and monitoring trailer locations, per the release.

"Outrider represents the type of company we at GOOSE want to fund," says Samantha Lewis, director of GOOSE, in a news release. "It is innovative, disruptive, and led by an all-star CEO that has a proven track record in recruiting top talent and top tier investors. GOOSE has been with Andrew from the beginning of his entrepreneurial pursuits and, still, he continues to impress us everyday."

Outrider, which has 75 employees — including 50 engineers focused on the automation technology — has launched pilots with Georgia-Pacific and four Fortune 200 companies. Smith says his relationship with GOOSE has had a positive effect on his career and his startup.

"The experience of GOOSE membership is unmatched. GOOSE, it's founder Jack Gill, and initial members, Art Ciocca and Rod Canion, played major roles in my entrepreneurial career by funding my first successful clean startup and then becoming seed investors in Outrider," says Smith in the release. "I am fortunate to have the team at GOOSE by our side again as we officially emerge from stealth and continue to scale the business."

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Building Houston

 
 

As the new UH medical school welcomes its second class, it's also planning for a new facility to support low-cost care. Photo via UH.edu

The University of Houston College of Medicine has announced it will open a low-cost health care facility thanks to a $1 million gift from The Cullen Trust for Health Care.

UHCOM will open the direct primary care clinic on the campus of Memorial Hermann Southwest Hospital, and, according to a news release from UH, it's only just the beginning of a network of clinics focused on treating those without health insurance.

"A direct primary care practice will add value to the local health care ecosystem by tackling one of the most pressing problems of our city: the lack of a comprehensive primary care system for the uninsured," says UH President Renu Khator in the release. "The Cullen Trust for Health Care shares our commitment to improving the overall health and health care of the population of Greater Houston and we are grateful for their support."

The direct primary care, or DPC, model is an alternative to insurance-based and fee-based care and eliminates third party payers. Instead, patients pay a monthly membership to receive primary care services — including telehealth, basic office procedures, at-cost laboratory testing, and access to medications at reduced prices. The clinic will offer same-day or next-day appointments as a guarantee and be staffed by faculty physicians and UH health professions students.

"The UH College of Medicine wants to restore primary care as the foundation of health care. We have developed a model with strong incentives to innovate the delivery of primary care designed to improve quality and more effectively control the cost of care," says Dr. Stephen Spann, founding dean of the UH College of Medicine, in the release. "We are building our model upon the four pillars of access, population health, social determinants of health and trusting relationships. In this framework, the physician is accountable for the health of their member panel and will demonstrate long-term cost and quality outcomes."

Dr. Stephen Spann is the founding dean of the UH College of Medicine. Photo via UH.edu

Founded in 2020, UHCOM's brief existence has been supported by generous donors – including a foundational $50 million gift as well as an endowment. This latest funding is from The Cullen Trust for Health Care — established in 1978 as an organization that grants financial assistance to institutions providing health care services in the Greater Houston area.

"The Cullen Trust for Health Care is proud to support this pilot endeavoring to bring a new form of patient-centered primary care to Houston's underserved communities. We are hopeful that the new UH College of Medicine direct primary care clinic will proactively engage patients to increase utilization and improve continuity of care," says Cullen Geiselman, chairman of the board for The Cullen Trust for Health Care.

This week, the school also announced its second-ever class of students. The UHCOM class of 2025 includes 30 students selected out of about 6,000 applicants. According to a news release, more than half of the second cohort received a $100,000 four-year scholarship. The future doctors will be celebrated with a White Coat Ceremony on Saturday, July 31, at the Hilton University of Houston.

More than half — 67 percent — of the new class is female and 60 percent of the group are Black or Hispanic. Sixty-three percent represent low socioeconomic status (as defined by Texas Medical Dental Schools Application Services).

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