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3 Houston tech startups name new leadership members

These fast-growing companies have new personnel announcements to share. Photos courtesy

Three Houston startups have new hires they're excited about. From new board members to C-level execs, here's who's moving and shaking in Houston innovation.

Software company hires new product exec

Photo courtesy of Cart.com

Cart.com, an end-to-end e-commerce services provider, announced Michael Svatek as the company's first chief product officer. Formerly, Svatek served as chief product and strategy officer at Bazaarvoice and then co-founded and served as the CEO and head of product at Rivet Works, a cloud software platform.

"Michael's deep expertise across the e-commerce technology value chain coupled with his experience in M&A, strategic alliances, and entrepreneurship are one-of-a-kind in this industry, and a testament to our growth and trajectory at Cart.com," says Omair Tariq, Cart.com co-founder and CEO, in a news release. "We are so pleased to welcome Michael, a proven leader with an innate understanding of the Cart.com mission to unify and streamline the fragmented e-commerce value chain for brands of any size."

Earlier this year, Cart.com raised a $25 million series A funding round and emerged from stealth mode.

Fast-growing e-commerce startup lawyers up

Photo courtesy of GoExpedi

Houston-based GoExpedi, another tech company disrupting e-commerce, once again expanded its executive board, naming Julie Gremillion as general counsel. She has more than 10 years of experience in working with energy companies, and will lead the company's legal strategy, managing compliance and risk throughout the organization, and more.

"We are thrilled to have found Julie, one of the most experienced, savvy and well-rounded legal counsels in the industry," says Tim Neal, GoExpedi CEO, in a news release. "Her legal background in the energy space is beyond reproach. As we enter this next critical phase of growth, Julie's combined commercial and legal expertise will provide us with a platform for long-term and sustainable success."

GoExpedi also recently fundraised a $25 million round last fall.

Recently acquired therapeutics company adds board member

Photo via aiche.org

Clinical-stage biotechnology company, Coya Therapeutics Inc. has appointed Ann Lee., senior vice president of Cell Therapy Development and Operations at Bristol Myers Squibb, to the company's board of directors.

"Dr. Lee is one of the leading cell therapy technical development, supply chain and manufacturing executives in the biopharmaceutical industry," says Howard Berman, Coya CEO, says in a release. "At Coya, we are revolutionizing cell therapy manufacturing and supply chain management via proprietary cryopreservation to overcome prior limitations of Treg cell therapies. Dr. Lee's expertise will be instrumental as we advance in the clinic and build out manufacturing partnerships."

The company, which focuses on creating therapeutics for neurodegenerative and autoimmune diseases, announced earlier this year that it has completed a merger with Nicoya Health Inc. and raised $10 million in its series A.

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For over a year now, scientists have been testing wastewater for COVID-19. Now, the public can access that information. Photo via Getty Images

In 2020, a group of researchers began testing Houston's wastewater to collect data to help identify trends at the community level. Now, the team's work has been rounded up to use as an online resource.

The Houston Health Department and Rice University launched the dashboard on September 22. The information comes from samples collected from the city's 39 wastewater treatment plants and many HISD schools.

"This new dashboard is another tool Houstonians can use to gauge the situation and make informed decisions to protect their families," says Dr. Loren Hopkins, chief environmental science officer for the health department and professor in the practice of statistics at Rice University, in a news release. "A high level of virus in your neighborhood's wastewater means virus is spreading locally and you should be even more stringent about masking up when visiting public places."

The health department, Houston Water, Rice University, and Baylor College of Medicine originally collaborated on the wastewater testing. Baylor microbiologist Dr. Anthony Maresso, director of BCM TAILOR Labs, led a part of the research.

"This is not Houston's first infectious disease crisis," Maresso says in an earlier news release. "Wastewater sampling was pioneered by Joseph Melnick, the first chair of Baylor's Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology, to get ahead of polio outbreaks in Houston in the 1960s. This work essentially ushered in the field of environmental virology, and it began here at Baylor. TAILOR Labs is just continuing that tradition by providing advanced science measures to support local public health intervention."

It's an affordable way to track the virus, says experts. People with COVID-19 shed viral particles in their feces, according to the release, and by testing the wastewater, the health department can measure important infection rate changes.

The dashboard, which is accessible online now, is color-coded by the level of viral load in wastewater samples, as well as labeled with any recent trend changes. Houstonians can find the interactive COVID-19 wastewater monitoring dashboard, vaccination sites, testing sites, and more information at houstonemergency.org/covid19.

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