ready to launchpad

Photos: Downtown Houston innovation hub in renovated office building opens to the public

Downtown Houston has a new innovation space in Amegy on Main. Photo courtesy of Amegy Bank

Last week, a group of innovators, commercial real estate professionals, and Amegy Bank employees celebrated yet another feat in the Houston innovation ecosystem: another innovative and collaborative space's grand opening.

The Downtown Launchpad is officially open across a few floors in Amegy on Main, a renovated office building on the Southwest side of downtown Houston at 1801 Main St. The grand opening reception was held outside in the building's first floor courtyard adjacent to its upgraded parking garage. The event on May 18 coincided with Houston Tech Rodeo.

"The major renovations to Amegy on Main support our strong Amegy Bank culture and reinforce our commitment to supporting the Houston business, technology and entrepreneur community," says Kelly Foreman, senior vice president and manager of corporate real estate and facilities for Amegy, in a news release. "This space serves as a hub for start-ups and innovation, and the resulting job creation through these incubator programs will continue to be meaningful and impactful for our city."

The renovated space includes:

  • Coworking space managed by The Cannon
  • Accelerator and event space for the Launchpad
  • Main Line CafĂ©, a chef-driven restaurant concept open to the public
  • New courtyard
  • First-floor gaming lounge
  • New shared spaces and design elements for the building, such as expanded windows for improved daylight, new furniture, enhanced coffee bars
  • Expanded conference space

Originally announced in October 2019, the Downtown Launchpad opened parts of its upgraded space last fall. Now, the full renovation project is completed, offering a new opportunity for collaboration.

"Amegy on Main has become unlike any other space in Houston," Foreman continues. "We are thrilled to offer this new space, its amenities and business development support to our employees and the expanding innovation community."

Click through some photos of the complete spaces below.

Indoor/outdoor dining areas

Photo courtesy of Amegy Bank

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For over a year now, scientists have been testing wastewater for COVID-19. Now, the public can access that information. Photo via Getty Images

In 2020, a group of researchers began testing Houston's wastewater to collect data to help identify trends at the community level. Now, the team's work has been rounded up to use as an online resource.

The Houston Health Department and Rice University launched the dashboard on September 22. The information comes from samples collected from the city's 39 wastewater treatment plants and many HISD schools.

"This new dashboard is another tool Houstonians can use to gauge the situation and make informed decisions to protect their families," says Dr. Loren Hopkins, chief environmental science officer for the health department and professor in the practice of statistics at Rice University, in a news release. "A high level of virus in your neighborhood's wastewater means virus is spreading locally and you should be even more stringent about masking up when visiting public places."

The health department, Houston Water, Rice University, and Baylor College of Medicine originally collaborated on the wastewater testing. Baylor microbiologist Dr. Anthony Maresso, director of BCM TAILOR Labs, led a part of the research.

"This is not Houston's first infectious disease crisis," Maresso says in an earlier news release. "Wastewater sampling was pioneered by Joseph Melnick, the first chair of Baylor's Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology, to get ahead of polio outbreaks in Houston in the 1960s. This work essentially ushered in the field of environmental virology, and it began here at Baylor. TAILOR Labs is just continuing that tradition by providing advanced science measures to support local public health intervention."

It's an affordable way to track the virus, says experts. People with COVID-19 shed viral particles in their feces, according to the release, and by testing the wastewater, the health department can measure important infection rate changes.

The dashboard, which is accessible online now, is color-coded by the level of viral load in wastewater samples, as well as labeled with any recent trend changes. Houstonians can find the interactive COVID-19 wastewater monitoring dashboard, vaccination sites, testing sites, and more information at houstonemergency.org/covid19.

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