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3 Houston companies make Deloitte's fastest-growing tech list

Three Houston tech companies are seeing big business growth, according to Deloitte's report. Graphic via Deloitte

Three Houston companies have earned spots on this year's edition of the North American Technology Fast 500.

The three Houston honorees are:

  • Enercross, a provider of logistics software for the energy sector. It appears at No. 31 on the Fast 500 list, with revenue growth of 6,230 percent from 2017 to 2020.
  • Onit, which offers workflow and AI technology for legal, compliance, sales, IT, HR, and finance departments. It lands at No. 304, with a 408 percent rise in revenue from 2017 to 2020. According to Crunchbase, Onit has reeled in $216.6 million in venture capital.
  • Graylog, a provider of log management software. It sits at No. 309, with revenue growth of 402 percent from 2017 to 2020. Graylog has collected $27.4 million in venture capital, according to Crunchbase. That includes an $18 million round announced this summer.

The North America Technology Fast 500, sponsored by professional services firm Deloitte, is an annual ranking of the fastest-growing tech, media, telecom, life sciences, and energy tech companies in North America.

"The Houston companies on this year's Fast 500 list are transforming the way our city does business by combining technological innovation with entrepreneurial spirit," Amy Chronis, Houston managing partner at Deloitte, says in a news release. "I'm inspired by the ways these organizations have succeeded amid unprecedented times, and I look forward to seeing their progress in 2022."

The top-ranked company is Irvine, California-based medical device company Axonics, whose revenue soared 87,037 percent from 2017 to 2020. The top-ranked Texas company is Austin-based Shipwell, where revenue climbed 32,670 percent from 2017 to 2020. Shipwell provides a shipment-tracking platform. Overall, 5 percent of the Fast 500 companies are based in Texas.

Both Enercross and Onit showed up on last year's Fast 500. Enercross ranked 37th in 2020, with revenue growth of 5,881 percent, and Onit ranked 190th, with revenue growth of 641 percent. Meanwhile, Graylog is a new entrant this year.

Two Houston companies fell off the Fast 500 this year:

  • Lexicon Pharmaceuticals, which ranked 328th last year with revenue growth of 306 percent.
  • Vendor Credentialing Services (symplr), a tech platform that simplifies vendor services, compliance, and more for health professionals. It appeared at No. 426 last year, notching revenue growth of 221 percent.

Not surprisingly, Silicon Valley accounted for one-fifth of the companies in this year's Fast 500, followed by the New York City metro area (12 percent) and New England (8 percent). Nearly three-fourths of the Fast 500 companies specialize in software, and 81 percent of the companies have received venture capital at some point.

"Each year, the Technology Fast 500 shines a light on leading innovators in technology, and this year is no exception," says Paul Silverglate, leader of the U.S. technology sector at Deloitte. "In the face of innumerable challenges resulting from the pandemic, the best and brightest were able to pivot, reinvent and transform and grow."

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Building Houston

 
 

HCC is working on a new center focused on resiliency on its Northeast Campus. Image via HCC

Houston’s initiative to protect the city from catastrophes is getting a big boost from Houston Community College.

The college is developing the Resilience Center of Excellence to aid the city’s resilience campaign. At the heart of this project is the 65,000-square-foot, $30 million Resiliency Operations Center, which will be built on a five-acre site HCC’s Northeast campus. The complex is scheduled to open in 2024.

HCC estimates the operations center will train about 3,000 to 4,000 local first responders, including police officers and firefighters, during the first three years of operation. They’ll be instructed to prepare for, manage, and respond to weather, health and manmade hazards such as hurricanes, floods, fires, chemical spills, and winter freezes.

According to The Texas Tribune, the operations center will include flood-simulation features like a 39-foot-wide swift water rescue channel, a 15-foot-deep dive area, and a 100-foot-long “rocky gorge” of boulders.

The college says the first-in-the-nation Resilience Center of Excellence will enable residents, employers, civic organizations, neighborhoods, and small businesses to obtain education and certification aimed at improving resilience efforts.

“Our objective is to protect the well-being of our citizens and our communities and increase economic stability,” Cesar Maldonado, chancellor of HCC, said when the project was announced.

Among the programs under the Resiliency Center of Excellence umbrella will be non-credit courses focusing on public safety and rescue, disaster management, medical triage, and debris removal.

Meanwhile, the basic Resilience 101 program will be available to businesses and community organizations, and the emergency response program is geared toward individuals, families, and neighborhoods.

HCC’s initiative meshes with the City of Houston’s Resilient Houston, a strategy launched in 2020 that’s designed to protect Houston against disasters. As part of this strategy, the city has hired a chief resilience and sustainability officer, Priya Zachariah.

“Every action we take and investment we make should continue to improve our collective ability to withstand the unexpected shocks and disruptions when they arrive — from hurricanes to global pandemics, to extreme heat or extreme cold,” Mayor Sylvester Turner said last year. “The time is now to stop doing things the way we’ve always done them because the threats are too unpredictable.”

In an InnovationMap guest column published in February 2021, Richard Seline, co-founder of the Houston-based Resilience Innovation Hub, wrote that the focus of resilience initiatives should be pre-disaster risk mitigation.

“There is still work to be done from a legislative and governmental perspective, but more and more innovators — especially in Houston — are proving to be essential in creating a better future for the next historic disaster we will face,” Seline wrote.

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