Down pat

4 secrets to being pitch perfect from a startup founder

Whether you're pitching your startup in a competition or for capital, here are some expert tips. Getty Images

One of the things our team at EllieGrid is most famous for is pitching. We have pitched our smart pill box in over 20 business plan competitions, on television, radio, and to so many investors that I have lost count. I can't remember what our first pitch was like but I know it has certainly evolved overtime. You could even say that we A/B tested some of our methods.

When you first organize your thoughts, you want to consider the basics, so before I give my advice, consider these tried-and-true tips.

  • Get to the point — say what your company is in the first 10 seconds
  • Know your audience
  • Shorter usually means better
  • Keep numbers to a minimum
  • Have a clear ask

In order to save you a little time, here are some of the of the lessons I learned the hard way to help you perfect your pitch.

Don't pitch. Tell a story.
I am going to let you in on a little secret: most people don't want to hear your pitch, especially if yours is not the first they have heard that day. Put yourself in their shoes, do you really want to listen to someone ramble on about facts and figures? Chances are, no. Instead, tell a story. Use engaging voices and set the scene. Recall your creative writing classes from high school and how you should mention what it was like in terms of feel, smell, taste, etc. and don't use generic adjectives such as "too small" or "the old way was hard."

People remember how you made them feel
What is in it for your audience? Is it wealth, power, fame, praise or glory, and/or pleasure? It might sound obvious to make this point when pitching, but I suggest you write out your pitch and highlight exactly where you say what is in it for them, maybe even more than once. Making the audience feel like you are caring about their desires and engaging them in conversation will help you be more memorable.

Come full circle
My favorite technique in any pitch or speech is if the speaker can connect the closing back to something they said at the beginning of their pitch. I enjoy this because sometimes the speaker will leave a question unanswered and then reveal how their solution is the answer in a creative way. This keeps your listeners engaged and connects the pain to your solution. Watch a few TED talks and you will see what I mean.

Pitch to a kid
This is probably the best advice I can give because it is a surefire way to make sure your pitch makes sense to a wide range of listeners. This also forces you to leave out jargon and filler words that you think might make you sound fancy like "innovative" or "disruptive" but actually make you sound like everyone else.

------

Regina Vatterott is the COO and co-founder of Ellie Grid, a Houston-based company reinventing medical devices. Read more about Regina here.

The Lone Star State stands out for being the best to start a business. Photo by gguy44/Getty Images

The entrepreneurial spirit is best cultivated by Texans, apparently. The Lone Star State comes in first place for being business-friendly to startups and their founders in a recent study.

Out of all 50 states, Texas reigns supreme in WalletHub's report of the best and worst states to start a business. Texas earns a score of 61.05, which factored in business environment, access to resources, and business costs. Of those factors, the state ranked No. 1 for business environment, No. 11 for access to resources, and No. 30 for business costs.

Zeroing in on some key factors, Texas was recognized for having the fourth highest average growth in small businesses and the fifth highest total spending on incentives as its percent of gross domestic product. Texas also has the fourth longest work week by hours.

Texas edged out No. 2 Utah by a mere 0.1 points. The rest of the top five includes Georgia, North Dakota, and Oklahoma, respectively. At the bottom of the rankings are Connecticut, Hawaii, New Hampshire, New Jersey, and Rhode Island.

"In looking at the main criteria WalletHub used to determine their best startup state ranking — namely business environment, access to resources and business costs — it's clear why Texas would come in at No. 1," Susan Davenport, senior vice president of economic development for the Greater Houston Partnership, tells InnovationMap. "These are all areas where the Lone Star State consistently excels and why Texas continues to attract both entrepreneurs and existing companies across industry sectors."

Houston recently received a similar distinction from the personal finance site. In May, WalletHub used 19 key metrics — such as five-year business-survival rate and office-space affordability — to name Houston the No. 13 best city for starting a business out of 100 of the largest U.S. metros. In that study, a total of seven Texas cities made the top 20.

"Here in Houston, we're seeing growth in tech-related startups in particular and an increasing momentum of activity to support growth stage companies including the development of The Ion and the TMC3 commercialization campus, and the opening of The Cannon start-up hub, among several others," Davenport adds.

Texas also has a favorable business climate for female entrepreneurs in particular, one study found. Texas moved up to No. 1 from No. 8 in 2018 in this report by Fit Small Business that published in January.

Meanwhile, while known for being best for business, Texas is far from the top ranking in a study that analyzed the states' overall capacity. Texas came in at No. 38 in U.S. News & World Report's best states rankings for 2019, but even this report recognized Texas' business climate.

"Texas' diverse industrial base has drawn many businesses and workers in recent decades because of light regulation, low taxes and a low cost of labor," U.S. News says. "Entrepreneurs are particularly attracted to Austin, which emerged as a major player in the technology industry in the 1990s. Its 'South by Southwest' is one of the preeminent national tech conferences."

-------

This article was updated to include the comment from GHP.