Pros and cons

3 things to consider before investing in coworking space for your company

Sharing common space or having a glass-wall office might not be ideal for your company. Getty Images

While coworking is an established trend in many of the nation's larger metropolitan areas, the innovative approach to office space has been slower to gain momentum in Houston from a tenant's perspective, making up less than 1 percent of the city's total inventory of office space.

Coworking has tended to appeal to startups and one- or two-person consulting firms and is currently available in Houston in various forms and price points. Nationally branded WeWork and Techspace offer an amenity-rich and more expensive option geared toward corporate clients, while other coworking providers, like Station Houston and The Cannon, have targeted tenants seeking connections to investors and mentors.

Coworking options can now be found in many parts of Houston. Office landlords are even converting portions of their buildings to coworking suites to meet increased demand.

Before you invest in this new type of office space, consider the following aspects that come with coworking space.

1. Flexibility is the key driver
From a user experience point of view, coworking has both advantages and disadvantages. Flexibility and price are the key elements. In contrast to multiyear year lease terms required by traditional landlords, coworking is a shorter commitment. Terms of six to 12 months for fully furnished offices are the norm, but month-to-month leases are also common. Rent is calculated based on a per-person model, compared to the rent-per-square-foot structure of a traditional office or warehouse lease.

For a one-person company or a small team, sharing a kitchen and conference room can be well worth the lower monthly rent expense, ranging between $800 and $2,000 per month. Touch and go memberships are also available at most coworking locations, providing access to the common areas for a typical monthly fee of less than $200, but without the benefits of a private office. However, as companies scale up and grow, the per-person model for rent begins to make less economic sense.

2. Beware of the add-ons
Coworking typically provides shared use of conference rooms with a monthly allocation of time for each tenant. Some offer beer, coffee, and social and networking events, and a few even permit dogs. It is important to read the fine print of the agreements and be prepared to pay additional charges for extra amenities not included in the monthly rent — everything from garage parking to fees for internet, furniture rental, snacks, and kitchen use.

3. Privacy and identity
Sharing a glass-walled team office with coworkers and taking private calls in a shared space is not the right fit for every company. For some firms, their critical objective is a work environment that reflects company brand, culture, or professional image — a feature not necessarily offered with coworking.

However, as Houston has witnessed changing work patterns, commute issues, and the importance of work-life balance, our city has responded and can now offer many more flexible workspace options.

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Julie King is president of NB Realty Partners. She has mentored and provided commercial real estate advice to technology, biotech, and early-stage companies for over 20 years.

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Building Houston

 
 

. Photo via Getty Images

CruxOCM, a startup with a significant Houston presence that specializes in robotic industrial process automation for energy companies, has secured even more business from energy giant Phillips 66.

The value of the deal wasn’t disclosed.

Houston-based Phillips 66 has agreed to expand it use of CruxOCM’s pipeBOT technology to cover even more pipelines. The pipeBOT technology is designed to improve the safety and efficiency of control room operations for pipelines and reduce control room costs.

CruxOCM and Phillips 66 launched a test of pipeBOT in 2020.

CruxOCM, based in Calgary, Canada, says pipeBOT is engineered to decrease manual controls through intelligent automation. With this technology in place, the fatigue of control room operators declines, because as many as 85 percent fewer manual commands must be entered, according to CruxOCM. Therefore, control room operators can focus on higher-level tasks.

“At CruxOCM, we empower control room operators with modern software that enables the autonomous control rooms of tomorrow, within the safety constraints of today. We look forward to continuing to strengthen our relationship with Phillips 66 for many years to come,” Adam Marsden, chief revenue officer at CruxOCM, says in a news release.

Founded in 2017, Crux OCM (Crux Operations Control Management) established its Houston presence last year. Also in 2021, the startup raised $6 million in venture capital in a “seed extension” funding round. Bullpen Capital led the round, with participation from Angular Ventures, Root Ventures, Golden Ventures, Cendana Capital, and Industry Ventures.

In 2019, Angular Ventures and Root Ventures co-led a $2.6 million funding round.

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