Pros and cons

3 things to consider before investing in coworking space for your company

Sharing common space or having a glass-wall office might not be ideal for your company. Getty Images

While coworking is an established trend in many of the nation's larger metropolitan areas, the innovative approach to office space has been slower to gain momentum in Houston from a tenant's perspective, making up less than 1 percent of the city's total inventory of office space.

Coworking has tended to appeal to startups and one- or two-person consulting firms and is currently available in Houston in various forms and price points. Nationally branded WeWork and Techspace offer an amenity-rich and more expensive option geared toward corporate clients, while other coworking providers, like Station Houston and The Cannon, have targeted tenants seeking connections to investors and mentors.

Coworking options can now be found in many parts of Houston. Office landlords are even converting portions of their buildings to coworking suites to meet increased demand.

Before you invest in this new type of office space, consider the following aspects that come with coworking space.

1. Flexibility is the key driver
From a user experience point of view, coworking has both advantages and disadvantages. Flexibility and price are the key elements. In contrast to multiyear year lease terms required by traditional landlords, coworking is a shorter commitment. Terms of six to 12 months for fully furnished offices are the norm, but month-to-month leases are also common. Rent is calculated based on a per-person model, compared to the rent-per-square-foot structure of a traditional office or warehouse lease.

For a one-person company or a small team, sharing a kitchen and conference room can be well worth the lower monthly rent expense, ranging between $800 and $2,000 per month. Touch and go memberships are also available at most coworking locations, providing access to the common areas for a typical monthly fee of less than $200, but without the benefits of a private office. However, as companies scale up and grow, the per-person model for rent begins to make less economic sense.

2. Beware of the add-ons
Coworking typically provides shared use of conference rooms with a monthly allocation of time for each tenant. Some offer beer, coffee, and social and networking events, and a few even permit dogs. It is important to read the fine print of the agreements and be prepared to pay additional charges for extra amenities not included in the monthly rent — everything from garage parking to fees for internet, furniture rental, snacks, and kitchen use.

3. Privacy and identity
Sharing a glass-walled team office with coworkers and taking private calls in a shared space is not the right fit for every company. For some firms, their critical objective is a work environment that reflects company brand, culture, or professional image — a feature not necessarily offered with coworking.

However, as Houston has witnessed changing work patterns, commute issues, and the importance of work-life balance, our city has responded and can now offer many more flexible workspace options.

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Julie King is president of NB Realty Partners. She has mentored and provided commercial real estate advice to technology, biotech, and early-stage companies for over 20 years.

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Building Houston

 
 

"There's something magical happening in Houston, and [VCs] want a piece of it." Photo via Getty Images

Houston's seen a growth in startup and venture investment — even amid the pandemic — and a group of Houston innovators sat down for a virtual event to discuss what's lead to this evolution.

The Greater Houston Partnership hosted an installment of its Houston Industry Series focused on Digital Tech on Thursday, September 24. The panel of experts, moderated by Krisha Tracy of Google Cloud, discussed how they've observed the paradigm shift that's occurred in Houston over the past few years — and why.

Missed the discussion? Here are some significant overheard moments from the virtual event.

“I think there really is an interest for venture capital here, both locally and also welcoming it from outside of Houston. … There’s something magical happening in Houston, and [VCs] want a piece of it. I think that magical piece is a renewed interest in collaborating.”

Stephanie Campbell, managing director of Houston Angel Network and co-founder of The Artemis Fund. "I think a lot [of this progress] is due to the GHP, Houston Exponential, and the founding of the HX Venture Fund to bring those venture funds to Houston to say, 'what's happening here?'" Campbell adds, saying that this connectivity and collaboration that's happening in Houston VC is unique.

“I think there’s a misconception around all we do is oil and gas and life science in Houston, but when you think about what VC-backable companies look like, they’re tech, they’re B2B SaaS, they’re highly scalable, and they don’t tend to be capital-intensive types of things we see corporate venture backing.”

Campbell says, adding "the connectivity and the interest in VC is really taking off. It's an exciting time to be in Houston and Texas in general."

“Plug and Play’s ventures team is based in Silicon Valley and one thing they enjoy about meeting Houston-based founders is valuations tend to be more reasonable than in the Bay Area."

Payal Patel, director of Plug and Play Tech Center in Houston. "There are gems to be found," she adds.

“I don’t know what it is — if it’s something in the water or just Texans being very friendly, but the investors here share deal flow. It takes a village, and I think we all understand a rising tide lifts all boats."

Patel says on the collaborative nature of Houston. "It's really magical."

“What you’re witnessing is a city that has been waiting for industrial innovation to reach the point where it can be adopted at a really high scale, and that happened around 2017.”

Jon Nordby, managing director at MassChallenge Texas in Houston. Nordby adds that MassChallenge in Houston hasn't been keen on consumer tech, or the "grilled cheese delivery apps," as he describes. "We like companies that are in love with problems, not so much in love with solutions. … We build really meaningful tech."

“Over the last year or two, we’ve seen that sleeping giant get awoken. Open and external innovation is newly adopted by more legacy industries where it wasn’t before — and that’s just created a mountain of opportunities for startups and investors alike.”

Nordby says on the shift toward this meaningful, problem-solving technology, which Houston is full of, as he observes.

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