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3 Houston innovators to know this week

This week's innovators to know include Samantha Snabes and Charlotte Craff of Re:3D and Andrew Bruce of Data Gumbo. Photos courtesy

Editor's note: In today's Monday roundup of Houston innovators to know as we start a new week, we introduce you to two forward-thinking 3D printing experts and a startup founder with fresh funds to tackle smart contracts in the industrial sector.

Samantha Snabes and Charlotte Craff of Re:3D

Re:3D's Samantha Snabes, co-founder, and Charlotte Craff, who oversees community relations, join the Houston Innovators Podcast to share what makes their company different and where the industry is headed. Photos courtesy of Re:3D

Houston-based Re:3D has no shortage of exciting business opportunities — from developing bigger and better 3D printers to hosting tours in their lab. But, one thing co-founder Samantha Snabes and community expert Charlotte Craff are proud of is their partnership with local organizations to create PPE for the People, a movement that helped create and provide PPE for workers in need.

"As the pandemic continued, the data was emerging that people of color in Black and Brown communities and underserved communities were at greater risk of critical illness from COVID-19," Craff says on the podcast. "We wanted to specifically target people of color who were working as Texas opened back up its doors." Read more.

Andrew Bruce, CEO of Data Gumbo

Andrew bruce's growing Houston blockchain startup has raised $4 million to go toward supporting sales. Photo courtesy of Data Gumbo

While the intersection of dropping oil prices earlier this year and a global pandemic provided its own set of challenges, one thing Andrew Bruce of Data Gumbo Corp. observed is that it was more important than ever for the energy industry to focus on their bottom line. And that's exactly what his technology allows to happen.

"The opportunity in all this is companies have got to cut expenses," Andrew Bruce, CEO and founder, tells InnovationMap. "What's happened to us is our sales have absolutely exploded — in a good way. We have a huge number of leads, and we have to be able to deliver on those leads."

Last month, Data Gumbo closed a $4 million series B funding round led by new investor L37, which has operations in the Bay Area and in Houston. The round also saw contribution from returning investors Equinor Ventures and Saudi Aramco Energy Venture. Read more.

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Building Houston

 
 

A new report finds Houston a top city for business friendliness and connectivity. Photo via Getty Images

Houston, the future looks bright.

A new study from the fDi Intelligence division of the Financial Times places Houston at No. 7 among the top major cities of the future for 2021-22 across North, South, and Central America. Among major cities in the Americas, Houston appears at No. 3 for business friendliness and No. 4 for connectivity.

"Houston is known as one of the youngest, fastest-growing, and most diverse cities anywhere in the world. I am thrilled that we continue to be recognized for our thriving innovation ecosystem," Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner is quoted as saying in the fDi study.

Toronto leads the 2021-22 list of the top major cities in the Americas, followed by San Francisco, Montreal, Chicago, and Boston.

The rankings are based on data in five categories:

  • Economic potential
  • Business friendliness
  • Human capital and lifestyle
  • Cost effectiveness
  • Connectivity

Houston's no stranger to the list. Last year, the city ranked No. 3 on the same study, and in 2019, claimed the No. 5 spot.

"The fact that Houston consistently ranks among the top markets for foreign direct investment speaks to our region's connectivity and business-friendly environment," says Susan Davenport, chief economic development officer at the Greater Houston Partnership. "Many of the industry sectors we target for expansion and relocation in Houston are global in nature — from energy 2.0 and life sciences to aerospace and digital tech. The infrastructure and diverse workforce that make these prime growth sectors for us among domestic players are equally attractive to international companies looking to establish or strengthen ties in the Americas."

International trade is a cornerstone of the Houston area's economy. In 2020, the region recorded $129.5 billion in exports, according to the Greater Houston Partnership. China ranked as the region's top trading partner last year, followed by Mexico, Brazil, Korea, Germany, the Netherlands, India, Japan, the United Kingdom, and Italy.

Houston's role as a hub for foreign trade and international business "is likely to support the region's economic recovery in the months and years ahead," the partnership noted in May.

"We talk often of Houston as a great global city — one that competes with the likes of London, Tokyo, São Paulo, and Beijing. But that's only possible because of our infrastructure — namely our port — and our connections around the world," Bob Harvey, president and CEO of the partnership, said last month. "Houston's ties abroad remain strong."

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