On deck

When it comes to meeting with investors, a simpler pitch deck is better

Pitch decks in San Francisco and New York tend to be simpler. Getty Images

There's something about California pitch decks that Houston companies can learn a thing or two from. Most of them are simpler and highlight those few key points that really show a company might be a success. Simpler, in this case, is good.

However, the investor pitch deck doesn't get you the investment, the deck gets you the meeting. And when an investor is considering a company to meet with, they don't want to comb through scientific detail before getting to know the entrepreneur. It's the entrepreneur who we want to talk to. We want to see and hear their ability to communicate the complex information.

The simple pitch deck is crucial for the entrepreneur to get that initial meeting. It forces the entrepreneur to showcase their best and most important key metrics. Then, it's the entrepreneurs live performance is the real key to attaining an investment.

In Houston — and in other more conservative towns — we tend to see pitch decks that have a lot more information density on each page. It ends up being a traditional business plan, but in landscape orientation instead of portrait orientation.

A lot of more traditional investors in cities like Houston must prefer this additional detail in the deck, right?

Perhaps, but the trend I see is that cities where more venture capital dollars are raised (seed-stage and otherwise) tend to have simpler pitch decks for that initial outreach. San Francisco's are simpler than New York's. New York's are simpler than Austin's. Austin's are simpler than Houston's. And so on.

Maybe I am wrong to recommend having the simpler pitch deck in an environment where there are fewer investors and fewer deals. However, when the simpler pitch deck can be made by cutting away parts of the longer more complex one, shouldn't entrepreneurs be able to create this pitch deck? The process is boiling down the core message, and who doesn't want to work on that?

Work on that elevator pitch and work on that short pitch deck. Of course you need to detail, but sometimes you need the simplicity.

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Mark Friday is an associate leading venture capital investments at Houston-based Cathexis Holdings LP.

The Rice Angel Network will now be powered by Cannon Ventures. Photo courtesy of Rice University

In an effort to better connect Houston entrepreneurs with angel funds, the Rice Angel Network and Cannon Ventures have formed a new partnership. RAN will now be powered by Cannon Ventures, the investment arm of The Cannon, a West Houston coworking space.

RAN is already located in The Cannon, according to its website, but the new arrangement will allow RAN to leverage The Cannon's programming, events, resources, and community as it continues to serve its alumni network.

In December, the two entities have partnered up in the past for the Houston Investor Network Alliance, a collaboration where participating investors can partner up to co-invest in startups, co-host investor events, and share opportunities. According to the release, this new partnership "takes this a step further" to team up to provide early-stage investment.

"The mission is simple," says Lawson Gow, CEO and founder of Cannon Ventures and The Cannon, in a release. "We want to bring Houston's startup ecosystem the access to capital that they need to thrive here in Houston."

Gow, who is the son of InnovationMap's parent company's CEO, started Cannon Ventures almost a year ago. He's a Rice alumnus, as is Kyle Fletcher, the managing partner of Rice Angel Network.

"Houston is one of the largest cities in the US, yet our efforts to bring capital to startups has been done only in pockets throughout the city," Fletcher says in the release. "We are better together than we are separate."