Money matters

What you need to know for when your startup hits the big time, according to this Houston expert

First thing's first: Don't tell everyone. Jonathan Kitchen/Getty Images

If you have a successful tech startup, you may be working towards an exit plan where your vision and innovation is turned into liquidity. When a unique, innovative idea hits the big time, investors and other tech companies take notice, and some founders of startups discover themselves with sudden wealth.

Whether you take your company public or are eventually acquired by a much larger organization, you may find yourself looking at millions or billions of dollars one day. If this happens to you, there are crucial steps you should consider to help ensure you stay financially healthy for the long-term.

Keep your head down and do your homework.

First, be as quiet as possible about your new windfall. While selling your company may be public knowledge, keep conversations about your finances and situation minimal and confidential until you have a plan. The more hushed you keep your new financial situation, the less pressure you may have from others asking for favors and handouts.

Additionally, do your research before making any decisions. While you are coming to terms with your new wealth, search for the right team, including a financial adviser, attorney, and accountant, to help you set your goals, both long and short term. This may include tax efficiency and structure, such as trusts and family limited partnerships.

Research a potential advisers' philosophy, fees, and expertise. Have a background check run on anyone you hire, including their financial situation. Review your engagement letter and understand the small print. Be patient as you search for the right team — they are extremely important to your future.

Find an adviser you trust.

Part of your team should include a financial adviser who can be an invaluable resource during this time and into the future for many reasons.

First, he or she can help you identify potential present and future financial goals, plan for the next generation, and structure an income stream, which will ultimately help guide your money to survive you. You might find yourself in the unique position to make donations you have only dreamed of, and that, too, requires guidance.

A financial adviser can also help when friends and organizations are looking for financial contributions from you. Sudden wealth often leads to many changes which are hard to anticipate. Do not let your guard down. Family and friends can come out of the woodwork. Also, be aware of frivolous lawsuits and threats. Keep you and your family safe.

Don't go crazy.

Be disciplined in your spending. Some pro-athletes and lottery winners have filed for bankruptcy after blowing all of their wealth. Do not fall into this trap.

With the help of your financial adviser, you may decide to put your money where you cannot access it easily, such as a house or a 529 savings plan for your children's college. Or, you may decide to have your financial adviser help establish a salary for you each month so you can control your cash better.

After working hard to build a product or platform and the success of selling it for top dollar, ensure you are just as wise with your proceeds. Follow trusted advice from a well-vetted financial adviser and take your time to make major decisions. Trust your gut and enjoy the ride!

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Gail Stalarow is vice president and financial adviser with The Clarity Group in the Wealth Management Division of Morgan Stanley in Houston.

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Building Houston

 
 

Tvardi Therapeutics Inc. has fresh funds to support its drug's advancement in clinical trials. Photo via Getty Images

A Houston-based clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company has raised millions in its latest round.

Tvardi Therapeutics Inc. closed its $74 million series B funding round led by new investors New York-based Slate Path Capital, Florida-based Palkon Capital, Denver-based ArrowMark Partners, and New York-based 683 Capital, with continued support and participation by existing investors, including Houston-based Sporos Bioventures.

"We are thrilled to move out of stealth mode and partner with this lineup of long-term institutional investors," says Imran Alibhai, CEO at Tvardi. "With this financing we are positioned to advance the clinical development of our small molecule inhibitors of STAT3 into mid-stage trials as well as grow our team."

Through Slate Path Capital's investment, Jamie McNab, partner at the firm, will join Tvardi's board of directors.

"Tvardi is the leader in the field of STAT3 biology and has compelling proof of concept clinical data," McNab says in the release. "I look forward to partnering with the management team to advance Tvardi's mission to develop a new class of breakthrough medicines for cancer, chronic inflammation, and fibrosis."

Tvardi's latest fundraise will go toward supporting the company's products in their mid-stage trials for cancer and fibrosis. According to the release, Tvardi's lead product, TTI-101, is being studied in a Phase 1 trial of patients with advanced solid tumors who have failed all lines of therapy. So far, the drug has been well-received and shown multiple durable radiographic objective responses in the cancer patients treated.

Dr. Keith Flaherty, who is a member of Tvardi's scientific advisory board and professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, offered his support of the company.

"STAT3 is a compelling and validated target. Beyond its clinical activity, Tvardi's lead molecule, TTI-101, has demonstrated direct downregulation of STAT3 in patients," he says in the release. "As a physician, I am eager to see the potential of Tvardi's molecules in diseases of high unmet medical need where STAT3 is a key driver."

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