high anxiety

Texans among the most stressed-out people in America, says new study

Work and family are top causes of stress for Texans. Photo via Getty Images

No wonder nearly 40 percent of Texans have packed on the pounds during the coronavirus pandemic. It turns out Texas ranks as the 10th most stressed-out state in the country.

A new study by personal finance website WalletHub indicates Texas' sixth-place ranking for work-related stress and its seventh-place ranking for family-related stress contribute heavily to the state's No. 10 position on the stress-o-meter. Texas shows up at No. 11 for health- and safety-related stress, and No. 30 for money-related stress.

Experts say a high level of work-related stress, as is the case in Texas, can be connected to weight fluctuations. In a survey by the FitRated website for fitness equipment reviews, one-fourth of full-time workers reported changing their eating habits due to work-related stress.

"If you're stressed at work, you might … notice a shift in your appetite. For some people, stress-related eating can reflect a loss of appetite or the craving for comfort food," according to the Weatherford-based American Institute of Stress.

WalletHub looked at 41 indicators of stress for the study, including average hours worked per week, personal bankruptcy rate, and share of adults getting adequate sleep. Texas shows up at No. 4 for both the most average hours worked per week and the lowest credit scores. Here's how Texas fares in other parts of the study, with a No. 1 rank signaling the most stress:

  • No. 8 for share of adults in fair or poor health.
  • No. 13 for share of population living in poverty.
  • No. 14 for crime rate per capita.
  • No. 19 for psychologists per capita.
  • No. 25 for divorce rate.
  • No. 28 for job security.
  • No. 30 for housing affordability.

Nevada tops WalletHub's list of the most stressed-out states; South Dakota sits at the opposite end of the stress spectrum.

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This article originally ran on CultureMap.

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Building Houston

 
 

Molecule has closed new funding to . Photo via Getty Images

A Houston startup with a software-as-a-service platform for the energy transition has announced it closed a funding round with participation from a local venture capital.

Molecule closed its $12 million series A, and Houston-based Mercury Fund was among the company's investors. The company has a cloud-based energy trading and risk management solution for the energy industry and supports power, natural gas, crude/refined products, chemicals, agricultural commodities, softs, metals, cryptocurrencies, and more.

"We led the seed round of Molecule upon their formation and are excited to participate in their series A," says Blair Garrou, co-founder and managing director of Mercury, in a news release. "Molecule's success in the ETRM/CTRM industry, especially in relation to electricity and renewables, positions them as the company to beat for the energy transition in the 2020s."

The company will use its new funds to further build out its product as well as introduce offerings to manage renewables credits, according to the release.

"In 2020, we realized that electricity — the growth commodity of the 2020s — represented over half of Molecule's customer base, and we decided to double down," says Sameer Soleja, founder and CEO of Molecule, in the release. "We were also rated the No. 1 SaaS ETRM/CTRM vendor. With this fundraise, we have the fuel to become No. 1 SaaS platform for power and renewables, and then the market leader overall.

"Molecule is ready to power the energy transition," Soleja continues.

Molecule's last round of funding closed in November 2014. The $1.1 million seed round was supported by Mercury Fund and the Houston Angel Network.

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