LabReady

Houston medical device startup enters clinical trials

LabReady ensures samples make it from the patient to the lab without compromising the quality of the sample. Photo via vaximmune.com

Houston-based Vax-Immune Diagnostics has commenced on a new multicenter clinical trial to roll out a specific lab test as a part of its LabReady product.

The 12-week study will analyze results from Group B Streptococcus lab tests in expecting mothers. Currently, 16 to 20 percent of pregnant women are affected by GBS, according to a news release, which will then infect their newborn through the childbirth process.

Vax-Immune's product, LabReady, enhances the transportation process of lab samples and aims to improve the quality of results in patients. The company is expected to report data from the trial this summer.

"Currently samples are not regulated through transport from the patient to the lab often causing inaccurate test results. And inaccurate test results can cause significant problems since medical decisions are based on these results," Dr. Leonard E. Weisman, president and chief technology officer at Vax-Immune Diagnostics, says in the release.

"Our device, LabReady collects, protects, processes, and prepares the sample from the patient through transport, so when it arrives at the laboratory, infection can easily and accurately be diagnosed."

This study is planned to randomize approximately 300 patients from 35 to 37 weeks of pregnancy, according to the release. GBS is the most common cause of infections such as sepsis, meningitis, and pneumonia among newborns. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, among other organizations, have launched efforts for screenings and tests to reduce cases of neonatal GBS disease.

Vax-Immune was a member of the Texas Medical Center's 2018 TMCx Medical Device cohort and pitched at the 7th TMCx Demo Day. The company is a JLABS @ TMC resident.

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Building Houston

 
 

Veronica Wu, founder of First Bight Ventures, recently announced new team members and her hopes for making Houston a leader in synthetic biology. Photo courtesy of First Bight Ventures

Since launching earlier this year, a Houston-based venture capital firm dedicated to investing in synthetic biology companies has made some big moves.

First Bight Ventures, founded by Veronica Wu, announced its growing team and plans to stand up a foundry and accelerator for its portfolio companies and other synthetic biology startups in Houston. The firm hopes to make Houston an international leader in synthetic biology.

“We have a moment in time where we can make Houston the global epicenter of synthetic biology and the bio economy," Wu says to a group of stakeholders last week at First Bight's Rocketing into the Bioeconomy event. "Whether its energy, semiconductor, space exploration, or winning the World Series — Houstonians lead. It’s in our DNA. While others look to the stars, we launch people into space.”

At First Bight's event, Wu introduced the company's new team members. Angela Wilkins, executive director of the Ken Kennedy Institute at Rice University, joined First Bight as partner, and Serafina Lalany, former executive director of Houston Exponential, was named entrepreneur in residence. Carlos Estrada, who has held leadership positions within WeWork in Houston, also joins the team as entrepreneur in residence and will oversee the company's foundry and accelerator that will be established to support synthetic biology startups, Wu says.

“First Bight is investing to bring the best and the brightest — and most promising — synthetic biology startups from around the country to Houston," Wu continues.

First Bighthas one seed-staged company announced in its portfolio. San Diego-based Persephone Biosciences was founded in 2017 by synthetic and metabolic engineering pioneers, Stephanie Culler and Steve Van Dien. The company is working on developing microbial products that impact patient and infant health.

Wu, who worked at Apple before the launch of the iPhone and Tesla before Elon Musk was a household name, says she saw what was happening in Houston after her brother moved to town. She first invested in Houston's synthetic biology ecosystem when she contributed to one of Solugen's fundraising rounds. The alternative plastics company is now a unicorn valued at over $1 billion.

“I founded First Bight because of what I see is the next great wave of technology innovation," she says at the event. "I founded it in Houston because the pieces are right here.”

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