now enrolling future doctors

University of Houston's medical school gets accreditation, plans to start first class in July

The University of Houston College of Medicine can now enroll its inaugural class. Photo courtesy of University of Houston

The University of Houston has received the green light to move forward with its recruiting and enrolling its first class of 30 medical students for the first new medical school in Houston in over 50 years.

The University of Houston College of Medicine has received its preliminary accreditation from the Liaison Committee on Medical Education, the authority on medical education in the United States and Canada that is sponsored by the American Medical Association and the American Association of Medical Colleges.

This accreditation means the school can begin enrolling its inaugural class of 30 students and begin classes on July 20. Each of these new students will receive a $100,000 four-year scholarship thanks to an anonymous donor.

"Today is a historic day for the University of Houston, city of Houston, and the state of Texas because we are building this dream together," says Renu Khator, president and chancellor of the university, in a news release. "By training the next generation of compassionate physicians who understand how to provide quality health care at a reasonable cost, we are expanding our capabilities to serve the people and neighborhoods too often left behind."

Khator announced her plans to create the new school in 2014, with the goal being to address the shortage of 4,800-plus primary care physicians in Texas, according to the release.

For now, the school will operate out of UH's Health 2 Building, but the university plans to break ground this summer a new $80 million College of Medicine building. Completion is expected in 2022.

The school will focus its curriculum on primary care, behavioral and mental health, and preventive care, per the release, and create a household-centered care program that involves connecting a student with a family in an underserved community. According to the release, UH med students will be required to spend four weeks in a clinic in a rural part of the state.

"At full staffing we will have 65 full-time faculty teaching on campus, but there will be also be a large number of community-based faculty teaching in the outpatient and inpatient clinical settings," says Dr. Stephen Spann, founding dean of the medical school, in the release. "It is imperative that we place our medical students and faculty directly in the communities with the most need."

The school will still need fill accreditation from LCME, and, according to the release, this level of approval is usually granted within the fourth year of operation as long as the school meets the standards set by the organization.

"We are extremely grateful to receive LCME accreditation, but now the real work begins because we want to be accountable for improving the overall health and health care of the region," Spann says in the release.

Choosing the right city in which to launch your startup can make or break your company. Miguel Tovar/University of Houston

Choosing the best city for your startup can mean the difference between success and closing up shop prematurely. It's important to think outside your home city for a startup launch because your home city may not have the ecosystem set up for your particular startup.

If you give in to your emotions; staying in your hometown because it's, well, your hometown, you risk preventing your company from launching in a city more conducive to its growth.

Here are three keys to making sure you choose the right city for your startup.

A city's ecosystem

Few things are more valuable to a new company than a web of like-minded companies, investors, social groups and connections. You want a city that uses its resources to grow and maintain its startups. Whether it be accelerators or pitching events or entrepreneur conferences, the city you choose needs to be active in the startup community. Establishing your startup in a city with a weak ecosystem will halt the growth of your company because it'll be that much harder to boost your company without a city's support.

A city's social network

A city with a robust social circle of like-minded entrepreneurs is a city that is doing something right for startups. First of all, if the city is rich in like-minded entrepreneurs, then that means they are living there. So there has to be a reason for that: the city is startup-friendly. Second, a city with a strong social sphere of startups means you have more opportunities to make connections and network. You can meet with other business owners to discuss issues important to your companies and even learn new things from each other. What's more is you have a chance to work with other companies to help each other grow. The city of New Orleans has Krewe de Nieux, for example. This social group is a resource for over forty technology startups in the city.

A chance to give back

Opportunities to give back. The best city for your startup will have plenty of opportunities to give back. For example, giving high school students real-life work experience to expand their knowledge and prepare them for a career in the field. A city with a plethora of opportunities like charities, youth groups, internships and career and business organizations allows startups to barter: we will give you experience and you can help us get work done. You help each other grow. In doing so, you blossom the city's startup community as a whole.

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This article originally appeared on the University of Houston's The Big Idea.

Rene Cantu is the writer and editor at UH Division of Research.