2 for 1

2 major Texas hospital systems merge with service and innovation in mind

Houston-based Memorial Hermann could soon be part of one of the largest health care networks in Texas. Photo via memorialhermann.org

Two powerhouse medical centers have decided to team up to become one of the largest health care systems in Texas.

Houston-based Memorial Hermann Health System and Dallas-based Baylor Scott & White Health's board members signed a letter of intent to merge and create a combined system, according to an October 1 press release. A definitive agreement is expected to be complete in 2019.

"Together, we believe we will be able to accelerate our commitments to make care more consumer centric; grow our capabilities to manage the health of populations; and bend the unsustainable healthcare cost curve in the state," says Chuck Stokes, president and CEO of Memorial Hermann, in the release. "Through this combined system, we have a unique opportunity to reinvent healthcare and make a profound difference in the lives of millions of Texans."

The two systems together have over 68 hospital campuses, 1,100 care delivery sites, almost 14,000 physicians, and serve almost 10 million patients each year, according to the release.

The combined organization will operate under a unified board, led by Ross McKnight, the current chair of the Baylor Scott & White Holdings Board of Trustees. A vice chair will be selected by Memorial Hermann and will serve as the chair after McKnight's two-year term.

Jim Hinton, current CEO of Baylor Scott & White, will be the CEO. Stokes will serve in the proposed office of the CEO, along with current Baylor Scott & White president, Pete McCanna.

"Baylor Scott & White was founded as a Christian ministry more than 100 years ago; ever since, it has advanced health and driven change in North and Central Texas," McKnight says in the release. "This proposed combination starts the next chapter in the legacies of service and innovation for both systems. It will not only make a positive difference in the lives of millions here, it will become a national model."

Both organizations will maintain their brands and names locally. Executive and support staff will be based in the cities where the two entities currently have operations: Austin, Dallas, Houston, and Temple.

"This is about two mission-driven organizations — both committed to making safe, high-quality healthcare more convenient and affordable — building something transformative together," Hinton says in the release. "We must lead the change in our industry, while insisting we continue to fulfill our unwavering commitments to meeting the needs of all Texans."

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Building Houston

 
 

Five research teams are studying space radiation's effect on human tissue. Photo via NASA/Josh Valcarcel

A Houston-based organization has named five research projects to advance the understanding of space radiation using human tissue. Two of the five projects are based in Houston.

The Translational Research Institute for Space Health, or TRISH, is based at Baylor College of Medicine and funds health research and tech for astronauts during space missions. The astronauts who are headed to the moon or further will be exposed to high Galactic Cosmic Radiation levels, and TRISH wants to learn more about the effects of GCR.

"With this solicitation, TRISH was looking for novel human-based approaches to understand better Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) hazards, in addition to safe and effective countermeasures," says Kristin Fabre, TRISH's chief scientist, in a news release. "More than that, we sought interdisciplinary teams of scientists to carry these ideas forward. These five projects embody TRISH's approach to cutting-edge science."

The five projects are:

  • Michael Weil, PhD, of Colorado State University, Colorado — Effects of chronic high LET radiation on the human heart
  • Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic, PhD of Columbia University, New York — Human multi-tissue platform to study effects of space radiation and countermeasures
  • Sharon Gerecht, PhD of Johns Hopkins University, Maryland — Using human stem-cell derived vascular, neural and cardiac 3D tissues to determine countermeasures for radiation
  • Sarah Blutt, PhD of Baylor College of Medicine, Texas — Use of Microbial Based Countermeasures to Mitigate Radiation Induced Intestinal Damage
  • Mirjana Maletic-Savatic, PhD of Baylor College of Medicine, Texas — Counteracting space radiation by targeting neurogenesis in a human brain organoid model

The researchers are tasked with simulating radiation exposure to human tissues in order to study new ways to protect astronauts from the radiation once in deep space. According to the release, the tissue and organ models will be derived from blood donated by the astronaut in order to provide him or her with customized protection that will reduce the risk to their health.

TRISH is funded by a partnership between NASA and Baylor College of Medicine, which also includes consortium partners Caltech and MIT. The organization is also a partner to NASA's Human Research Program.

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