M&A

TMC-accelerated Houston startup exits to health services giant

ScalaMed, which went through the TMC Accelerator in 2018, has been acquired. Photo via TMC

Healthcare services giant Cardinal Health has acquired Houston-based startup ScalaMed, whose platform transfers prescriptions directly to patients via a secure mobile app. The purchase price wasn’t disclosed.

ScalaMed now falls under the umbrella of a Cardinal-owned company called Outcomes. ScalaMed’s technology will be available throughout Cardinal’s nationwide pharmacy network.

“As healthcare continues to evolve toward patient preferences, the acquisition of ScalaMed allows us to center our connected ecosystem around the patient from the outset of their treatment journey — from the doctor’s office to the pharmacy to home,” Brent Stutz, senior vice president and general manager of Dublin, Ohio-based Outcomes, says in a news release. “Using ScalaMed’s technology, we can better support patients at every step along their treatment journey through unified communication and more informed insights that will help remove access and adherence barriers.”

Dr. Tal Rapke, founder and CEO of ScalaMed, says the process of digitizing prescriptions removes the patient from the equation, helping them bypass challenges such as forgetting medication while on vacation or lacking a convenient pharmacy nearby.

ScalaMed, founded in 2016 in Australia, raised $1.1 million in funding, according to Crunchbase. It was a member of the TMC Accelerator’s medtech program in 2018.

“With the scale and innovation Cardinal Health offers, we can revolutionize how prescriptions are filled and help solve the massive, costly challenge of medication nonadherence,” says Rapke, who’s a physician.

According to an article published in 2016 by the Journal of Managed Care & Specialty Pharmacy, medication nonadherence happens when a new medication is prescribed for a patient, but the patient does not obtain the medication or an appropriate alternative within an “acceptable” period after it was prescribed.

An article published in 2018 by The Permanente Journal reported that medication nonadherence happens with as many as 40 percent to 50 percent of patients who are prescribed drugs for chronic conditions like diabetes and high blood pressure. Each year, medication nonadherence costs the U.S. healthcare system $528 billion and contributes to about 275,000 avoidable patient deaths, according to a study published in 2018 in the Annals of Pharmacotherapy.

“Medication adherence … constitutes one of the ‘big hairy problems’ or ‘big hairy audacious goals’ of healthcare,” says an editorial published in 2020 by BMJ Journals.

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Building Houston

 
 

With the consumer price index rising 9.1 percent since last year, many Americans are evaluating new employment opportunities with better pay. However, employees would be wise to consider the risks of accepting a new position in the face of inflation and a possible recession, which could leave employers unable to sustain higher wages and generous benefits.

As a safer option in the longterm, employees may wish to ask for a raise from their current management, yet many do not know how to start the conversation. By understanding best practices for negotiations, employees can improve their chances of obtaining a pay raise without undermining relationships.

Understand the risks of job-hopping

Conventional wisdom suggests that job hopping can result in higher salary increases than an annual raise. During the pandemic, many employees took advantage of labor market shortages to secure new positions for higher pay. However, job hopping presents risks, particularly in an uncertain economic environment. Companies may institute “last in, first out” layoffs, leaving recent hires unemployed.

Even in strong economic conditions, job-hoppers face uncertain outcomes. When employees leave a company, they may leave behind teammates, mentors, client partnerships and friendships years in the making. These relationships can redevelop in a new organization, but employees may find themselves in an unfamiliar setting, facing unrealistic expectations or unexpected challenges that were not clear during the interview process.

Prepare ahead of time

Before approaching management with a request for a raise, employees should understand their own financial needs and how much additional compensation would improve their finances. If inflation has caused financial strain, employees should gather recent data on inflation, including the consumer price index, to share with management. The more information employees can offer about changing economic conditions, the more management will understand and accept their position.

Focus on the positive

Employees should begin a conversation about salary with praise for the organization and a reiteration of their commitment to the team. By beginning on a positive note, employees set the tone for a mutually productive conversation. Although employees may view salary negotiations as adversarial across the table, productive negotiations are a conversation with both employee and employer on the same team.

Likewise, while employees may worry about looking greedy, employees should not let that fear prevent them from opening the conversation. Employers also understand that employees work to meet their financial needs. While employers may face budget constraints or other considerations in salary allocation, strong management also recognizes the importance of nurturing growth among employees, both in compensation and job responsibilities.

Nonetheless, employees should focus the discussion on broader economic conditions like inflation, not on their personal budget items. By acknowledging the economic environment outside of the employer’s control, employees can then respectfully request their salary be adjusted for inflation.

Employees with a record of strong results can also gather data or performance reviews to demonstrate their contributions to the team beyond the expectations of their role. In doing so, employees can frame a salary increase as a celebratory recognition of the mutually successful partnership between employee and employer and an investment in the relationship.

Be flexible if negotiations stall

If employers decline to adjust an employee’s salary for inflation, employees should not give up on negotiating additional compensation or benefits. Rather than a pay raise, employees can ask for reimbursement for gas mileage or additional remote days to cut down on their commutes. If management declines a pay raise based on timing, employees can acknowledge that management may face budgetary constraints, remaining flexible but firm. For instance, a compromise may involve revisiting the discussion in three to six months.

As employees face record-breaking inflation, it remains critical to consider the risks of departing one role for another. By implementing best practices in salary negotiations, employees can secure a salary increase that matches inflation, avoid the uncertainty of job-hopping and invest in the future at their current company.

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Jill Chapman is a senior performance consultant with Insperity,a leading provider of human resources and business performance solutions.

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