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This Houston sports tech entrepreneur wants more big wins for Houston

Stephane Smith wants his company, Integrated Bionics, and its sports tech sensor to be a big win for Houston. Courtesy of Integrated Bionics

It took Stephane Smith and his brother, Yves, a few tries to get a revolutionary sports device that the market actually wanted. Now that they have, their Houston-based company, Integrated Bionics, has its Titan Sensor device being used worldwide — from Zimbabwe and Israel to Brazil and Mexico.

The Titan, which launched in 2017, syncs GPS with video and provides athletic metrics at an attainable price. Most of the company's customers are soccer teams primarily in the collegiate space — with some professional and even youth teams. Smith says the company has a firm footing within soccer because that's where this technology really started.

"People were doing GPS and sensing with soccer before we arrived. Soccer had this orientation from the get go," Smith tells InnovationMap. "There's a lot higher of awareness in soccer — but we think that awareness is going to grow across all sports as people realize how this data can be used without breaking the bank."

Smith spoke with InnovationMap about figuring out the Titan's technology, Houston's challenging venture capital environment, and why he hopes to be one of the city's big wins.

InnovationMap: Why did you want to start a company?

Stephane Smith: My background is in engineering. I worked at Intel for five years. I worked at silicon server processors — very deep into that, down to drawing wires of ultra miniature fabrication for electronics. It was an awesome experience. My group at Intel was actually an analogue group that was purchased by Intel. Analogue groups tend to be high risk in general. The company has to have a lot of trust in those people. My boss told me I had to go do something. At the time, I was married but didn't have any kids or own a home, so he was nudging me a little bit on a personal development side to go do my thing. This was in California, so everyone had startup fever. So, I quit my great job, and decided to do a startup.

IM: What brought you to Houston?

SS: We figured the cost of living was good, and it's where we grew up. We thought it'd be a good fit. My brother, Yves, and my co-founder, was doing a research project at the University of Texas at San Antonio.

IM: What was you and your brother’s first product?

SS: I'm a solutions guy and he had problems to solve. His problem at the time was sleep apnea monitoring and making sure patients are using the device. We made this really tiny device that could fit inside the retainer and it could communicate whether or not the person was wearing the mask. That was product No. 1. But then we found out no one wanted to buy it in the real world. It was kind of a reality check.

We pivoted. Inside the sensor, is something that could detect motion. We took the appliance and stuck it on a headband. I had one of my wife's friends do a header on a soccer ball. We had this nice video of someone heading a ball and the impact or reaction of the head movement. That was a couple years ago, and everyone was concerned about concussions. That was called Heads Up. We had some success and sales at the college level, but it still wasn't there yet.

IM: What was the issue with Heads Up?

SS: Concussions were kind of a taboo topic. The device was indicating something bad that happened. Something they did like on the report was how many steps they took. They were just looking at the performance metric. So, it was back to the drawing board. At the same time, we were trying to raise money in Houston, and it was a massive struggle. Houston's a hard place to raise money in general and especially in sports. We decided to just raise money from the customers. We wanted to make sure that people actually wanted the product. We doubled the price of the device and added a GPS sensor. We sold it to three teams before we even had it built yet. That became the Titan Sensor.

IM: But you did eventually find funding, right?

SS: We sort of stumbled upon Work America Capital. We weren't looking for it. Someone in my past life told me to check out this profile of Shane Hildreth. And I was like, hey it's a sports guy. I didn't think there was any of them in Houston. So, I contacted them. I feel like they got us — not just sports, but us — and had the same values of us. It was more than the money. We found a partner in them.

IM: Do you see venture in Houston changing?

SS: I don't know. I doubt it, at the moment. I think that what's missing is big wins. The analogy I like to use is I don't think that any city can build the Texas Medical Center. It's something built over generations. Silicon Valley has the same thing. You can just say, "Oh in five years, we'll make a task force and shabam, we're the next Silicon Valley." Every city's dream is that — that's why you hear Silicon Hill, Silicon Rock, Silicon Pond — you name it. But there's only one Silicon Valley and that's not going to change. There needs to be more wins and more leadership. We need more fish swimming in that direction to create momentum. Hopefully we become a win and can help build that momentum. Houston has all the ingredients.

IM: What’s next for Titan and other products?

SS: We're going to continue relentless innovation — doing things that no one is expecting and helping coaches with things not even on the radar. We'll going to be rolling out new capabilities and features that have traditionally been relegated to high-end systems or that haven't even existed before.

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Portions of this interview have been edited.

Texas venture capital deals had a slow quarter, according to Crunchbase data. Getty Images

The entire state of Texas saw an unimpressive third quarter of venture deals — especially compared to the second quarter's reports — and Houston was not immune.

The state reported $372.4 million fundraised by tech startups in Q3 of 2019, according to Crunchbase data, which is less than half of what was reported in Q3 of 2018 ($776.8 million) and what the state raked in the second quarter of this year ($830.6 million).

Houston brought in a measly $38.4 million last quarter, per Crunchbase, and compared to the $251 million raised by Houston companies in Q2, that drop stings. It's the lowest quarterly venture amount Houston's seen in over a year, and lower than Houston's $44.7 million reported for Q1. Zooming out a little, the city's venture reports remain a rollercoaster of sorts with strong quarters bookended by lousy ones.

Chart via InnovationMap using Crunchbase data.

Austin maintained its top spot on the Texas venture leader board with $236.4 million of Texas' total $372.4 million raised in Q3 2019, according to Crunchbase, but that's about $200 million less than the city raised in Q2. Meanwhile, Dallas — a city Houston usually competes with for the No. 2 spot — raised $70.3 million compared to its $126.7 million raised in Q2. The only region up in raises is categorized as "other Texas metros," which went from $7.3 million to $27.4 million between Q2 and Q3.

According to Crunchbase, the city's $38.4 million was raised in six deals between June and September 2019. The top deal of those six companies was raised by Axiom Space, which closed a $16 million in a seed round.

Crunchbase's Texas reporter, Mary Ann Azevedo, reminds readers that their proprietary data is subject to reporting delays.

"Actual deal counts and dollar volume totals are higher than what Crunchbase currently has on record, and the numbers we're reporting today are likely to change as more data gets added to Crunchbase over time," she writes.

Just like Crunchbase, InnovationMap doesn't get to report on every single venture deal. However, here are some of the raises we covered in the third quarter of this year.

  • Spruce, a service provider for apartment residents, raised a $3 million round in July. The company moved its headquarters to Austin around the same time. Read more.
  • Grab, a mobile software company that's designed an airport mobile ordering app, closed a multimillion-dollar series A this summer. Read more.
  • Fannin Partners LLC, an early-stage life science commercialization company, closed a $5.25 million round this summer. Read more.
  • Voyager, a bulk shipping software company, raised $1.5 million in seed funding in August. Read more.
  • Cemvita Factory, which created a way to mimic photosynthesis, raised an undisclosed amount from corporate partners in August and September. Read more.
  • Galen Data, which uses its cloud-based software to connect medical devices, closed a $1 million seed round in September. Read more.
  • Syzygy Plasmonics, a hydrogen fuel cell creator, closed a $5.8 million Series A round in September. Read more.
  • sEATz, an app that allows in-seat ordering, closed a $1.3 million seed round in September. Read more.
  • Sourcewater Inc., which specializes in oilfield water intelligence, closed its series A round at $7.2 million in September. Read more.
  • Topl, a blockchain developer, raised over $700,000 in its seed round in September. Read more.