Top marks for Texas

Texas boasts highest starting pay in nation and more perks for workers, study says

Texas is one of the best states for jobs for many reasons. VioletaStoimenova/Getty Images

Texas is one of the most attractive states for workers, offering great starting salaries and job security, but there's still room for improvement in the Lone Star State, according to a new study.

Personal finance site WalletHub recently ranked the best and worst states for jobs in 2019, analyzing each in terms of the strength of its job market, opportunities, and economy. There's a lot of good — and surprising — news for Texas, which ranks No. 12 overall and places third in the economic environment category but 29th in the job market category.

Among the individual areas studied, Texas nabs a first-place ranking for highest monthly average starting salary ($3,331) along with the No. 14 spot in median annual income ($59,928). The Lone Star State scores well in several other areas, including its share of engaged workers (No. 5), job security (No. 6), and employment outlook (No. 13).

Texas falls in the middle in terms of disability-friendliness of employers (No. 20), availability of internships (No. 24), job opportunities (No. 27), and employment growth (No. 28).

There's more to be desired, however, across numerous aspects of working in Texas, including job satisfaction (No. 33); worker protection (No. 34); and average commute time (No. 37, clocking in at 26.1 minutes). We rank worst for length of average work week, No. 47; commuter-friendly jobs, No. 48; and employee benefits, No. 49.

Despite those downfalls, business is good in Texas. The Lone Star State recently was named one of the best states for women entrepreneurs and is home to many of the best cities for Hispanic business owners.

Massachusetts takes the No. 1 spot in this study, ranking first in job market and 16th in economic environment, while West Virginia comes in last, ranking 48th in economic environment and 49th in job market.

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This article originally ran on CultureMap.

Houston has the most energy efficiency jobs out of other metros in Texas, which has the second-most energy efficiency jobs in the country. Getty Images

The Houston metro area has plugged into the power of jobs linked to energy efficiency. In fact, the region is home to more than one-fourth of Texas jobs that fall into this category.

A new report shows the Houston area leads all of the metros in Texas for the number of jobs tied to energy efficiency. The report tallied 43,730 Houston-area jobs connected to energy efficiency, compared with 41,235 in Dallas-Fort Worth, 15,872 in Austin, and 12,860 in San Antonio. The report was produced by the nonprofit groups E4TheFuture and E2 (Environmental Entrepreneurs).

The number of energy-efficiency-oriented jobs across Texas rose by 5.3 percent last year to 162,816, according to the report. That puts Texas second among the states, behind California, for the total number of jobs in energy efficiency. Energy-efficiency workers account for 17 percent of all energy workers in Texas, the report says.

Of the energy-efficiency jobs in the Houston area, 15,806 are in the congressional district of U.S. Rep. Dan Crenshaw, a Houston Republican. That's the highest number of any congressional district in the state. Crenshaw's district includes Houston, Spring, and Atascocita.

"Energy jobs are critical to our economy and must be a priority when considering any industry regulation coming out of Washington," Crenshaw says on his website. "We have to unleash the power of the Texas energy sector and become the world leader in energy that we are meant to be."

The report defines jobs in the energy-efficiency sector as those involving goods and services that reduce energy use by improving technology, appliances, buildings, and power systems. Among these positions are construction worker, architect, manufacturing sales representative, and HVAC specialist.

The report, released September 16 at the annual meeting of the National Association of State Energy Officials, highlights the economic potency of energy efficiency.

"While politicians argue over the direction of our energy transition, the economic benefits of improving energy efficiency continue to unite America's business and environmental interests," Pat Stanton, director of policy at E4TheFuture, says in a release. "Not only is expanding America's energy efficiency key to solving multiple climate policy goals, it is now integral to businesses' expansion plans — saving money and creating local jobs that cannot be outsourced."

In 2018, energy-efficiency businesses added 76,000 net new jobs, representing half of all net jobs created by the U.S. energy sector (151,700). About 28,900 energy-efficiency businesses operate in Texas, with the bulk of those in the construction and manufacturing industries.

The expansion of the energy-efficiency sector aligns with push by the Greater Houston Partnership to ramp up the region's focus on energy technology and renewable energy. This year, the partnership estimates, the Houston area will add 1,900 jobs in the energy industry.

Some of the new breed of energy-efficiency workers in the Houston area could come from San Jacinto College's new $60 million Center for Petrochemical, Energy, and Technology in Pasadena. The center's first students began classes in August.

"We all know energy efficiency saves consumers and businesses money with every month's power bill," Bob Keefe, executive director of E2, says in a release. "We should also remember that energy efficiency is creating jobs and driving economic growth in every state — and doing so while also helping our environment, not hurting it."

Energy-efficiency workers are helping the environment by, for instance, building LED lighting systems, retrofitting office buildings, upgrading outdated HVAC systems, and designing power-sipping appliances.

"State energy officials understand that energy efficiency and the jobs that come with it [are] an integral and important part of the overall economy," David Terry, executive director of the state energy officials group, says in a release. "Policymakers at the state and federal levels will hopefully keep the size and reach of energy-efficiency employment in mind as they plan for the future."