Top marks for Texas

Texas boasts highest starting pay in nation and more perks for workers, study says

Texas is one of the best states for jobs for many reasons. VioletaStoimenova/Getty Images

Texas is one of the most attractive states for workers, offering great starting salaries and job security, but there's still room for improvement in the Lone Star State, according to a new study.

Personal finance site WalletHub recently ranked the best and worst states for jobs in 2019, analyzing each in terms of the strength of its job market, opportunities, and economy. There's a lot of good — and surprising — news for Texas, which ranks No. 12 overall and places third in the economic environment category but 29th in the job market category.

Among the individual areas studied, Texas nabs a first-place ranking for highest monthly average starting salary ($3,331) along with the No. 14 spot in median annual income ($59,928). The Lone Star State scores well in several other areas, including its share of engaged workers (No. 5), job security (No. 6), and employment outlook (No. 13).

Texas falls in the middle in terms of disability-friendliness of employers (No. 20), availability of internships (No. 24), job opportunities (No. 27), and employment growth (No. 28).

There's more to be desired, however, across numerous aspects of working in Texas, including job satisfaction (No. 33); worker protection (No. 34); and average commute time (No. 37, clocking in at 26.1 minutes). We rank worst for length of average work week, No. 47; commuter-friendly jobs, No. 48; and employee benefits, No. 49.

Despite those downfalls, business is good in Texas. The Lone Star State recently was named one of the best states for women entrepreneurs and is home to many of the best cities for Hispanic business owners.

Massachusetts takes the No. 1 spot in this study, ranking first in job market and 16th in economic environment, while West Virginia comes in last, ranking 48th in economic environment and 49th in job market.

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This article originally ran on CultureMap.

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Building Houston

 
 

Five research teams are studying space radiation's effect on human tissue. Photo via NASA/Josh Valcarcel

A Houston-based organization has named five research projects to advance the understanding of space radiation using human tissue. Two of the five projects are based in Houston.

The Translational Research Institute for Space Health, or TRISH, is based at Baylor College of Medicine and funds health research and tech for astronauts during space missions. The astronauts who are headed to the moon or further will be exposed to high Galactic Cosmic Radiation levels, and TRISH wants to learn more about the effects of GCR.

"With this solicitation, TRISH was looking for novel human-based approaches to understand better Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) hazards, in addition to safe and effective countermeasures," says Kristin Fabre, TRISH's chief scientist, in a news release. "More than that, we sought interdisciplinary teams of scientists to carry these ideas forward. These five projects embody TRISH's approach to cutting-edge science."

The five projects are:

  • Michael Weil, PhD, of Colorado State University, Colorado — Effects of chronic high LET radiation on the human heart
  • Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic, PhD of Columbia University, New York — Human multi-tissue platform to study effects of space radiation and countermeasures
  • Sharon Gerecht, PhD of Johns Hopkins University, Maryland — Using human stem-cell derived vascular, neural and cardiac 3D tissues to determine countermeasures for radiation
  • Sarah Blutt, PhD of Baylor College of Medicine, Texas — Use of Microbial Based Countermeasures to Mitigate Radiation Induced Intestinal Damage
  • Mirjana Maletic-Savatic, PhD of Baylor College of Medicine, Texas — Counteracting space radiation by targeting neurogenesis in a human brain organoid model

The researchers are tasked with simulating radiation exposure to human tissues in order to study new ways to protect astronauts from the radiation once in deep space. According to the release, the tissue and organ models will be derived from blood donated by the astronaut in order to provide him or her with customized protection that will reduce the risk to their health.

TRISH is funded by a partnership between NASA and Baylor College of Medicine, which also includes consortium partners Caltech and MIT. The organization is also a partner to NASA's Human Research Program.

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