track device

Houston-area university taps new tech to keep tabs on startups

Texas A&M University has announced a new technology that will keep up with Aggie-founded businesses. Photo via tamu.edu

Texas A&M University has teamed up with a tech company in New York state to track the performance of startups spawned by the College Station school.

The tech company, StartupTree, produces software that manages university entrepreneurship data. StartupTree is creating a performance-tracking platform for Texas A&M University Innovation Partners, which fosters A&M-born innovations, and the Texas A&M Engineering Experiment Station’s Office of Commercialization and Entrepreneurship. The platform will monitor the performance of Texas A&M spinouts. It also will match startups with business mentors, legal advisers, potential investors, and other resources.

Among the Houston companies affiliated with Texas A&M University Innovation Partners are ECM Biosurgery, a medical device maker, and

Pulmotect, a biopharmaceutical business.

“StartupTree is going to make it easier for our startups to be successful,” says Chris Scotti, director of new ventures at Texas A&M Innovation Partners and chairman of the Texas A&M New Ventures Competition. “It will be easier for startups to find mentorship, funding, and other forms of help they may need to bring a technology to market.”

Texas A&M joins the University of Texas System as a StartupTree customer.

“Already, Texas A&M has influenced the product in terms of data collection, including the ability for mentors and administrators to leave notes on venture profiles,” says Theresa Kim, president of StartupTree. “If we can play a role in developing scalable data collection processes for Texas A&M within the platform, we see this paying dividends over time, especially given the trends of external stakeholders being more data-focused.”

Texas A&M’s pilot phase of the StartupTree installation is expected to launch later this year.

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Building Houston

 
 

Electric vans will now be delivering to Houston. Photo courtesy of Amazon

Amazon CEO/occasional space traveler Jeff Bezos is doing his best to supplant a certain jolly fellow from the North Pole as tops for holiday gift delivery.

His latest move: Amazon is rolling out more than 1,000 electric delivery vehicles, designed by electric vehicle manufacturer Rivian, ready to make deliveries in more than 100 cities across the U.S. On the Texas good list: Houston, Austin, and Dallas. Bezos' juggernaut began deliveries in Dallas in July, along with Baltimore, Chicago, Kansas City, Nashville, Phoenix, San Diego, Seattle, and St. Louis.

These zero-emissions vans have delivered more than 5 million packages to customers in the U.S., according to Amazon. The latest boost in vehicles now includes Houston and Austin; Boston; Denver; Indianapolis; Las Vegas; Madison, Wisconsin; Newark, New Jersey; New York, Oakland, California; Pittsburgh, Portland, Oregon; Provo, Utah; and Salt Lake City.

Plans for the Amazon and Rivian partnership call for thousands of vehicles on the road by the end of the year and 100,000 vehicles by 2030.

“We’re always excited for the holiday season, but making deliveries to customers across the country with our new zero-emission vehicles for the first time makes this year unique,” said Udit Madan, vice president of Amazon Transportation, in a statement. “We’ve already delivered over 5 million packages with our vehicles produced by Rivian, and this is still just the beginning—that figure will grow exponentially as we continue to make progress toward our 100,000-vehicle goal.”

This all comes as part of Amazon's commitment to reaching net-zero carbon by 2040, as a part of its The Climate Pledge; Amazon promises to eliminate millions of metric tons of carbon per year with it s commitment to 100,000 electric delivery vehicles by 2030, press materials note.

Additionally, Amazon announced plans to invest more than $1 billion over the next five years to further electrify and decarbonize its transportation network across Europe. This investment is meant to spark innovation and encourage more public charging infrastructure across the continent.

“Fleet electrification is essential to reaching the world’s zero-emissions goal,” said Jiten Behl, chief growth officer at Rivian, in a statement. “So, to see our ramp up in production supporting Amazon’s rollout in cities across the country is amazing. Not just for the environment, but also for our teams working hard to get tens of thousands of electric delivery vehicles on the road. They continue to be motivated by our combined mission and the great feedback about the vehicle’s performance and quality.”

A little about the vans: Drivers’ favorite features include a spacious cabin and cargo area, superior visibility with a large windshield and 360-degree cameras, and ventilated seats for fast heating and cooling — a must for Bayou City summers ... or winters, for that matter.

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This article originally ran on CultureMap.

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