Guest column

How your company should respond to the coronavirus, according to this Houston expert

Here's how to toe the line between being precautious and alarmist when it comes to your company's approach to COVID19, aka the coronavirus. Getty Images

News stories of COVID19, also known as the coronavirus, are spreading faster than the virus itself — you can't turn on the television or open your web browser without seeing them. The virus' rapidly climbing statistics provide compelling content for today's 24/7 news cycle, but the constant inundation of new information makes it difficult for most of us to discern fact from fiction. Unfortunately, the result is too often fear – whether warranted or not.

The coronavirus and its potential global impact has already weakened an otherwise strong US economy. Now, as the virus threatens to impact everything from the NCAA's March Madness to the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo, organizations are considering how best to respond to their constituents' concerns and communicate their action plans.

In a blog post this week, the social media giant, Twitter, strongly encouraged it's 5,000 employees around the globe to work from home. Other companies are banning non-urgent travel. And amid mounting fears related to the virus, organizers canceled CERAWeek, an annual energy industry conference in Houston, and the cancelation of Austin's SXSW followed. Interestingly, companies that have been demonstrating an abundance of caution are being viewed favorably by the media and general public. So, what should your company be doing?

Establish an action plan

There is no need to panic or overreact — instead, act reasonably and be prepared to react responsibly as circumstances change. Your plan may only involve restricting travel now, but may have to evolve to allow employees to work from home next month.

A company's response to the coronavirus outbreak should be dictated by the nature of its business activities, its geographic areas of operation and reach, and the spread of the virus itself. A manufacturing plant in rural Texas may not have to respond in the same way a hotel in San Francisco might.

Practice cleanliness and common sense

Amid all the noise, it is easy for common sense to give way to hysteria. However, experts agree that the coronavirus is transmitted much like the cold or flu. General cleaning, hand washing, and antiviral hand sanitizers can help prevent the spread of the virus.

Make common sense precautions a part of your plan. Ensure that common areas and restrooms in your workplace are being thoroughly cleaned. Make antiviral soaps and hand sanitizers available to employees and visitors. And most importantly, encourage employees to stay home if they are feeling sick or displaying any symptoms of illness.

Communicate

In any crisis, honest communication helps to quell fear and alleviate uncertainty, so take this opportunity to reach out to your employees. If you've established a plan, share it with them. If you've stocked the supply closet with Clorox wipes, let them know. And if you've yet to formalize a plan, simply assure your employees that you are closely monitoring the situation and that your team is prepared to respond if circumstances in your area or industry change.

Look for opportunity

It sounds distasteful, but it needn't be. 3M, the makers of surgical masks, have announced they will ramp up production to respond to increased demand. 3M didn't manufacture this crisis, but they are responding to it in a positive way.

Moreover, general practitioners and scientists in every media market are being interviewed as subject matter experts on viruses — these doctors probably never anticipated such publicity, but by sharing their expertise, they are providing a useful public service. Consider whether your company can provide a helpful product, service or resource.

The coronavirus isn't the typical business crisis — astute leadership cannot resolve it, nor can ingenuity quickly solve it. But in the coming months, strong leadership and resourcefulness will be needed to proactively plan, effectively respond and ultimately rebound without ever giving into fear.

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Terrie James is the senior corporate communications expert at Paige PR, a Houston-based public relations and marketing agency.

The oil and gas industry has been hit by a trifecta of challenges. This local expert has some of his observations. Getty Images

In the matter of a few weeks, COVID-19 disrupted life across the globe, but the oil and gas industry was hit especially hard with the triple impact.

First, there was the direct impact of COVID-19 on the workforce. Next, there was a dramatic drop in global demand as countries and cities around the world issues travel restrictions. Finally, there was a global increase in oil supply as OPEC cooperation disintegrated.

As energy companies raced to set up response teams to address all three concurrent issues, something that no one was quite prepared for was the speed at which all direct lines of communication for the industry were shutoff. Seemingly overnight, industry conferences and events ground to a halt, corporate offices were reduced to ghost towns, and handshakes were replaced with virtual high fives.

To fill this inability to interact, connect, and collaborate as we used to, my company, Darcy Partners, stood up a series of executive roundtables for the exploration and production community to come together and share ideas on how to approach this unprecedented series of events.

Each week, over 25 executives from various oil and gas operators (and growing) gather virtually to share best practices around COVID-19 response plans, discuss the broader impacts of the turmoil on the industry and learn about innovative technology and process solutions others are implementing to help mitigate the impact of the virus and associated commodity price volatility.

We've seen the priorities of these executives shift and evolve with each phase of COVID-19 and the market impact. In early discussions, the main focus was on taking care of their workforce and what plans were being instituted to help minimize the disruption to operations while also ensuring that no one was exposed to any unnecessary risks. Participants shared best practices and policies they had in place for communication both internally and externally as well as their transition to work-from-home.

At later roundtables, the discussion turned to commodity prices and market response. Although this industry is quite accustomed to the inevitable ups and downs, this time is notably different. The market dynamics during this cycle are far more pronounced than in past downturns – largely due to the concurrent supply and demand imbalances coupled with the broader economic uncertainty. Most operators are taking action by making cuts, and some have already decided to shut-in production. Additionally, the importance of technology and innovation came to the forefront, whether discussing tools to facilitate working from home or remote operations to ensure the continued safe operations in the field.

The future is largely unknown; all of the information and analytics and millions of outcomes being modeled do not create the full picture needed for leaders to make the difficult decisions that are necessary. But there are a few things we know for sure. First, there will be an oil and gas industry on the other side of the current turmoil. Secondly, technology will play an increasingly important role going forward. And, finally, the complex issues the industry is dealing with today can be more effectively understood and managed by coming together to share ideas and best practices.

Nearly 5 years ago, Darcy Partners was founded on the premise that there was a missing link in the oil and gas Industry for the adoption of new technologies. Today, there is a missing link for an entirely different reason. Darcy Partners has rapidly mobilized our vast network of operators, technology innovators, investors, and thought leaders to come together and create a shared level of certainty, in an entirely uncertain world. To help leaders make the decisions that must be made and prepare for a new future, one that might not have been expected, but one that the industry will evolve to succeed in.

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David Wishnow is the head of energy technology identification and relationship management at Houston-based Darcy Partners.