Optimize you home with these smart technologies. Photo courtesy of Caydon

With recent changes to the ways we work and live, the importance of smart home technology in apartment complexes is becoming more important than ever. Residents not only want to streamline their lifestyles, but are looking for ways to limit contact when performing interactions.

A great example of smart home technology can be found at Drewery Place in Midtown. Built by Australian property developer Caydon, Drewery Place is at the forefront of smart home technology, providing residents with plenty of options to simplify their lifestyles in contactless style. Below are just some of the smart home features that residents in this tech savvy development enjoy.

Latch keyless entry

Fumbling for your keys is a thing of the past. Now you can use your phone to open not only your apartment door, but also resident-only areas such as the fitness center, pool area and pet park.

Smart thermostats

Come home to the perfect climate with smart thermostat technology. Now you can flick on the heat or blast in the cool as you can control the temperature from anywhere on your phone.

Set the scene

You know those days when things are just a little too bright? Or maybe you want to lighten the mood a little? Whatever you're feeling, get your lighting to match it with dimmer and lighting controls on your phone. There's also a host of pre-programmed lighting scenes so you can set the mood for any occasion.

Alexa — your new best friend

All of Drewery Place's apartments are wired and ready for Amazon's smart assistant, Alexa. Using voice control, you can get Alexa to adjust lighting, play your favorite music, summon an Uber and even order Amazon packages.

Caydon HQ

All residents at Drewery Place can pay their rent, request a maintenance repair, book amenities, organize a dog walker or request a Spruce chore such as a deep clean for their apartment. You can also get notifications from the concierge on when packages arrive and arrange contactless pickup from the downstairs mail lockers.

Get physical

Not into group classes? Organize a training session for one, anytime at the fitness center using MIRROR gym technology. This is literally a magic mirror, where a virtual trainer will train with you in the class of your choice. There's over 20+ categories to choose from, plus they'll correct your form in real-time — so you get personalized attention minus the class numbers.

The staff at Drewery Place are also taking extra precautions to help stop the spread of COVID-19 with regular deep cleanings, social distancing protocol and signage throughout the building. If you want to learn more, you can organize a personal tour complete with masks and social distancing.

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Emma Alexander is acting chief of operations and director of sales and marketing for Caydon.

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CultureMap Emails are Awesome

Houston startup shines bright as cryptocurrency's 'North Star'

Houston innovator's podcast episode 89

When Spencer Randall and his co-founders dreamt up the idea for CryptoEQ in 2018, they couldn't have even imagined how huge of a presence cryptocurrency would have in the world.

Within the past year, publicly traded companies holding Bitcoin on their balance sheet, El Salvador has announced its adopting Bitcoin as legal tender, dozens of other "altcoins" have emerged, and, as of earlier this month, thousands attended the biggest crypto event in the world.

Helping its users navigate it all is Houston-based CryptoEQ, which has, over the past 18 months, seen 10x growth in users and revenue — recently reaching the 30,000 user milestone.

"CryptoEQ is really built to be the North Star for digital asset research and information. We provide market insights for both newcomers and folks that are already well-versed in cryptocurrency and digital assets," Randall says on this week's of the Houston Innovators Podcast. "The idea of the company is to help shepherd folks along and guide them on their crypto journey."

The platform, which offers both free and paid membership, has expanded to be able to offer something for everyone, despite their cryptocurrency proficiency. In fact, recently the company entered into a partnership with The Cannon, an entrepreneurial hub with locations across Houston, to provide a one-of-a-kind crypto starter pack to help onboard innovators to the cryptosphere worldwide. The new offering launches this week.

"We have a lot of roots at the Cannon — we actually started building CryptoEQ at the original location of the Cannon. So, it's really cool to come full circle and buildout a crypto starter pack with the Cannon team," Randall says.

He shares more about the state of cryptocurrency and how he's seen his company grow on the episode. Listen to the full interview below — or wherever you stream your podcasts — and subscribe for weekly episodes.


Innovative Houston 'agrihood' grows impact with new land acquisition

lush land

One of the hottest trends in Houston's scorching real estate market is the rise of the "agrihood" — what's defined as an "organized community that integrates agriculture into a residential neighborhood."

Now, a suburban neighborhood/agrihood has announced a major expansion, aimed at adding more homes and to the fast-selling community.

Harvest Green, nestled in the Richmond area, has just acquired 630 acres adjacent to the neighborhood, according to ownership company Johnson Development.

That massive addition means some 1,400 homes that will be added to the agrihood-based development. Homesites should be ready for builders by the second quarter of 2022, per Jerry Ulke, general manager of Harvest Green, with sales expected to begin fall of 2022.

A key draw for Harvest Green is its 12-acre farm, which features fields of produce, an orchard, a vineyard, and pens for goats and chickens. Residents can join the farm club and access plots to grow their own produce (under the guidance of professional farmers). A popular farmers market is held the third Saturday of each month.

Meanwhile, future residents can also look forward to the Farmhouse recreation complex, with its fitness center and resort-style pool, trail, and a number of parks and playgrounds. The Messina Hof Harvest Green Winery & Kitchen (read the CultureMap story here) is also located onsite.

This new section will feature a variety of home styles, with designs for properties ranging from 40 feet wide to 75 feet wide, per press materials. Also on tap are additional community amenities, with parks, trails, green space, and a pool planned.

Residents will have access to existing Harvest Green amenities, including the Village Farm. As locals know, Oyster Creek winds through the new property for nearly two miles.

Currently, Harvest Green offers reasonably priced homes starting in the $300,000s by builders including Coventry Homes, David Weekley Homes, and Perry Homes.

"Our farm-themed community has resonated with buyers looking for a more sustainable lifestyle," Ulke continued in a press release.

"The past two years, Harvest Green has ranked among the nation's 50 top-selling master-planned communities, and last year we sold nearly 500 new homes. Because of last year's robust sales, builders had fewer than 100 homesites for all of 2021. This additional land will meet that obvious demand."

For more information, visit the official Harvest Green website.

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This article originally ran on CultureMap.

Houston university claims spot on top 100 institutions for patents

UH ranked

The University of Houston ranks among the world's top invention factories.

A new list from the Intellectual Property Owners Association and the National Academy of Inventors puts UH in a tie for 79th place among the 100 universities around the world that received the most U.S. utility patents in 2020. UH inventors earned 37 utility patents last year.

The only other Texas schools on the list are the University of Texas at Austin (ranked fourth with 207 patents) and Texas A&M University in College Station (tied for 70th place with 41 patents). The University of California leads the list (597 patents).

UH has ranked among the world's top 100 patent-receiving universities for the past six years. Utility patents cover new or improved processes, products, or machines. During the federal government's 2020 budget year, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office granted 360,784 utility patents. They're the most common kinds of patents in the U.S.

"The University of Houston is making critical contributions to science and engineering and hence to society, driven by our overarching goal to improve the quality of life. This ranking reflects our dedication to addressing the most pressing problems faced by society, including energy technology and medical care," Amr Elnashai, vice president and vice chancellor for research and technology transfer at UH, says in a news release.

Another testament to UH's patent prowess: Three researchers from the Cullen College of Engineering researchers are senior members of the National Academy of Investors for 2021. They are professors Hien Nguyen, Jeffrey Rimer, and Gangbing Song.

"Being affiliated with this prestigious organization will afford new opportunities for innovation and expanded research activities by engaging with a global network of highly accomplished inventors," Rimer says.

UH says a key to its success in moving technology from the lab to the marketplace is the UH Technology Bridge. With 30,000 square feet of incubator space and over 700,000 square feet of space for laboratories, pilot-scale facilities, and light manufacturing, the Technology Bridge houses 28 startups.

Plans for the Technology Bridge include expanding the 75-acre park into core districts, along with adding build-to-suit facilities. About 35 acres of the Bridge have been developed. So far, the university has invested more than $75 million in the Bridge.

"Companies taking products from idea to commercialization need expertise ranging from research to licensing to startup formation and operation," Elnashai said of the Bridge. "They need interns in specialized fields, technical and startup consultants, and they often need laboratories with large amounts of space for experimentation, to produce a prototype or to scale their operations. We have all of this to offer."