A panel for women by women highlighted key things to keep in mind when starting a company. Getty Images

Laying the proper foundation of a startup might be one of the most important parts of starting a company — right behind the innovative solution your startup aims to provide.

At a female-founder focused panel at Baker Botts cohosted by The Artemis Fund earlier this month, a group of experts gave their advice from managing contracts and hiring to salary and investment.

The panel was moderated by Grace Rodriguez, CEO and executive director of Impact Hub Houston, and featured an investor, a founder, and a legal representative — Leslie Goldman, general partner and co-founder of The Artemis Fund; Emma Fauss, CEO of Medical Informatics Corp.; and Katie Belleville, associate at Baker Botts L.L.P, respectively.

If you missed the event, here are four pieces of advice from the panelists.

Be aware of an investor's founder red flags

When asked about what she looks for in a potential investment opportunity, Goldman, who's fund invests in female-led startups, looks at a myriad of things, but the big one is the founder herself.

"Ninety percent of it is about the founder," Goldman says on the panel. "The founder is key."

She goes on to say that her founder red flags include lack of transparency, not knowing her numbers, and not having the proper legal paperwork in order.

Representing the legal side, Belleville echoed the importance of getting the proper legal paperwork together from day one.

"It is important to get you organizational documents in order in the beginning to avoid a problem later down the line," Belleville says. "Going to a lawyer to help you set up your company and what documents you need."

She adds that startup founders can expect to pay lawyers by the hour like most legal exchanges, but a lot of legal professionals will offer a preliminary meeting to understand each other for free.

Be smart about who's giving you money

For Fauss, who closed an $11.9 million round in January, and most entrepreneurs, finding investors is a huge challenge and commitment.

"Raising money is probably my least favorite activity. It's a brutal process," Fauss tells the audience. "You are getting married to someone for 20-plus years. And it's easier to get a divorce from your husband than it is to get a divorce from your board members."

She explains how keeping that in mind really led her to be picky about her investors and find ones that were right for her and her company.

When it comes to hiring and salary — get it on paper

Every founder will eventually get to a point when they'll need to hire as their company grows. Fauss says she was fortunate to find her early team members organically — through networking opportunities. When it comes to listing jobs online, she recommends being specific to what expertise you're looking for.

In tandem with hiring, founders must decide how they plan to compensate their employees and whether they offer equity — something Goldman says impresses her.

"If a founder convinced other people to join their team based on a promise of getting a part of the company, it means that they are a charismatic entrepreneur and it means that the people who join them believe strongly and passionately about the company," Goldman says.

Belleville adds that founders should be aware of employment agreements, which she doesn't think is necessary in every situation, and confidentiality agreements, which she highly recommends when it comes to protecting the company's intellectual property.

"If you make it part of the [on boarding] process, then everyone has one and you've got that security at the point when they're leaving," Belleville says.

At one point in the panel, Fauss brings up a salary issue she's passionate about.

"Don't forget to budget in your own salary," Fauss says. "Your sweat equity, your worth does have a cost."

She adds that even if you're not getting paid a full salary when you're starting out, it's important to keep in the budget especially when factoring VC money.

Keep your paperwork in order

This might be a no-brainer, but the panelists all echoed the need for properly organized paperwork, especially when it comes to contracts and letters of intent with clients, for general bookkeeping reasons but also for review of potential investors.

"I'm going to want to see that there's actually a binding contract there," Goldman says, adding that the legality and terms of those types of agreements are crucial for her role as an investor.

Belleville says that one way for founders to keep track is by making a detailed spreadsheet with all that's in the contracts — terms, renewal, and termination details, for example.

The panelists — and even some founders in the audience — recommended digital filing systems like Carta, or its free version called captable.io. DocSend was also recommended for sharing your pitch deck because it offers stats so you can see how much time was spent on each page. At the very least, founders should keep files backed up online in Google Docs or DropBox.

When it comes to issuing contacts, Fauss recommends working with a legal team to streamline that process. Ninety percent of contracts will stay the same between clients, she says, so put together a playbook to know which variables to use and when.

Check out these panels, networking meetups, and more. Getty Images

10+ can't-miss Houston business and innovation events for February

Where to be

Despite the short month, Houston will play host to tons of innovation networking, panel, and meetup events throughout the month of February. And, it's a leap year, so take that as an opportunity to jump into the startup ecosystim in town.

If you know of innovation-focused events for this month or next, email me at natalie@innovationmap.com with the details and subscribe to our daily newsletter that sends fresh stories straight to your inboxes every morning.

February 4 — How AI Can Boost Your Business with Ryan Shirzadi of Tekrevol

How can artificial intelligence help grow your business? Specifically, Ryan Shirzadi of Tekrevol will be covering the social impacts, industries affected, why you need an AI strategy, and how AI can help small businesses grow. Networking will follow the discussion and pizza will be provided by Tekrevol.

Details: The event is from 6 to 7:30 pm on Tuesday, February 4, at Station Houston (1301 Fannin Street, Suite 2440). Learn more.

February 5 — Meet and Greet with Pat Matthews, CEO & Founder of Active Capital

Meet Active Capital's founder and CEO, Pat Matthews. Rakesh Agrawal, founder and CEO of Snapstream, will interview Matthews followed up by an open Q&A and conversation with the audience.

Details: The event is from 5:30 to 6:45 pm on Wednesday, February 5, at WeWork (708 Main Street, 3rd Floor). Learn more.

February 5 — Houston Social Entrepreneurship Meetup

The meetup brings together like-minded individuals from the nonprofit, social enterprise, impact investing, technology and many other fields to understand the concept of social entrepreneurship and be inspired to find new ways to tackle local social issues. At each meetup, you'll get an intro to social entrepreneurship, hear from a social entrepreneur in Houston, and network with other changemakers from across the entrepreneur ecosystem.

Details: The event is from 5:30 to 7:30 pm on Wednesday, February 5, at Impact Hub Houston @ The Cannon Downtown (1801 Main St., 13th Floor). Learn more.

February 6 — Fail Forward presented by Frost Bank

Join BakerRipley and Frost Bank for an evening of #FailForward fun and get real, behind-the-scenes stories straight from entrepreneurs on the challenges they faced trying to access and raise funding for their small business or startups.

Details: The event is from 6 to 8 pm on Thursday, February 6, at BakerRipley Center (4450 Harrisburg Blvd.). Learn more.

February 12 — The Impact of AI on Automation and the Future of the Workforce

Technology and innovation are rapidly changing how we do and think about work. This panel event seeks to bring together respected leaders in the corporate and entrepreneurial worlds to have meaningful conversations on AI, automation and the future of workforce.

Details: The event is from 6:30 to 9 pm on Wednesday, February 12, at GA Houston (1301 Fannin St, Floor 21). Learn more.

February 13 — Female Founders Breakfast with Baker Botts and The Artemis Fund

Baker Botts L.L.P. and The Artemis Fund have come together to bring you a breakfast panel discussion on how a good corporate governance system and a little corporate housekeeping can avoid larger messes down the road.

Details: The event is from 8:30 to 10:30 am on Thursday, February 13, at Baker Botts (910 Louisiana St., 32nd Floor). Learn more.

February 18 — How She Got There: Women Leaders in Tech

Join General Assembly for an evening good conversation with a panel of females in tech. These inspirational women will share their stories on how they got to where they are today and share their insights into being a woman in business and tech.

Details: The event is from 6:30 to 9 pm on Tuesday, February 18, at GA Houston (1301 Fannin St, Floor 21). Learn more.

February 19 — Houston Angel Summit

Join the Houston Angel Network for its bi-annual summit. Attendees will learn the basics of angel investing as well as hear from experts on the topics of term sheets and tax implication of early stage investing. This event is open to accredited investors, HAN members and individuals from our partnership organizations. The price of attendance — $100 — will be applied to annual membership if attendees decide to join the Houston Angel Network.

Details: The event is from 9 am to 3 pm on Wednesday, February 19, at Liu Idea Lab for Innovation and Entrepreneurship (Cambridge Building at Rice University). Learn more.

February 20 — The Five W's of Holding Your First, First-in-Human Trial

Who, what, when, where and why to hold your first, first-in-human clinical trial? JLABS has tapped into experts in the field from Johnson & Johnson, CROs and agencies to help you answer these questions and more.

Details: The event is from 11:30 am to 2 pm on Thursday, February 20, at JLABS @ TMC (2450 Holcombe Blvd.). Learn more.

February 20 — Bunker Brews Houston: How to be Mentored in Your Business

Lots of entrepreneurs fail to seek out mentors, and struggle in silence and isolation because of it. Some will find great mentors, but fail to recognize the unspoken rules of the road to acquire, activate, and maintain a mentor-mentee relationship. Hear from some great local mentors of business owners.

Details: The event is from 6 to 8 pm on Thursday, February 20, at MassChallenge (1313 Main St., Suite 210). Learn more.

February 20 — Rising Stars in Houston Health Tech

Join General Assembly for an epic night with some of the Houston's most inspiring healthtech founders and leaders. In a candid discussion, they'll share their stories and insights.

Details: The event is from 6:30 to 9 pm on Thursday, February 20, at GA Houston (1301 Fannin St, Floor 21). Learn more.

February 24 — Made in Houston: Celebrating Black History Month

In honor of Black History Month, General Assembly has organized an evening with some of Houston's legendary innovators and creators. Each speaker will share their tips and tricks on how to create a unique product, service or brand that's pushing the boundaries while sharing their journey.

Details: The event is from 6:30 to 9 pm on Monday, February 24, at GA Houston (1301 Fannin St, Floor 21). Learn more.

February 25 — The Cannon Lunch & Learn: Show me the Money

As an early stage company, raising capital is or will be a significant part of your efforts and can present major challenges. Preparation and an understanding of what drives value is crucial to attracting investors. Join Cannon partner, Baker Tilly, as they provide an overview of the capital raise process and highlight key factors to consider when preparing to raise capital.

Details: The event is from 11:30 am to 1 pm on Tuesday, February 25, at The Cannon (1334 Brittmoore Road). Learn more.

Baker Botts is connecting the dots between its HQ, its startup-focused Silicon Valley outpost, and Texas accelerators. Nick Bee/Pexels

Houston-based international law firm forms partnerships with local startup accelerators

dream team

In order to keep up with the growing startup ecosystem in Houston, Baker Botts is connecting the dots between its Silicon Valley venture and entrepreneurial hub to strategic partnerships in its headquarters of Houston.

Houston-based Baker Botts L.L.P., an international technology and energy law firm, established its Emerging Companies and Venture Capital arm in Palo Alto, California, in 2009. Now, in order to tap into Texas startups, the firm has created strategic partnerships with three accelerator organizations: The Cannon, Station Houston, and Capital Factory.

"These three strategic partnerships provide an exciting opportunity to showcase the depth and breadth of our technology sector experience in the startup, venture capital and entrepreneur community," says Baker Botts managing partner, John Martin, in a release. "We have a history of working with emerging and technology companies throughout their full life cycle, and we expect these partnerships will expand those opportunities more broadly. Some of our firm's largest clients are businesses with which we have worked since they were startups themselves."

This news comes on the heels of The Ion breaking ground on July 19, the release notes, which represents another major collaborative effort and advancement of innovation in Houston.

"It is exciting to see Baker Botts expand its involvement with the Houston startup ecosystem," says Brad Burke, managing director of the Rice Alliance for Technology and Entrepreneurship, in the release. "The firm has a long history of supporting entrepreneurs in the region and has been a partner and supporter of the Rice Alliance and the Rice Business Plan Competition since 2002. The firm's expertise and connections will be of great value to startups in the Houston region. With the launch of the Ion in midtown, the launch of new accelerators, and the support of firms like Baker Botts, Houston is poised to transform its entrepreneurial landscape."

The strategic partnerships will put each accelerator and innovation hub in direct communication with Baker Botts' Emerging Company and Venture Capital practice, led by Brian Lee, partner-in-charge of the firm's Palo Alto office. The ECVC provides advice for entrepreneurs and startups, as well as connects them with investors and various industry professionals.

"In forming these partnerships, Baker Botts will be working with a range of innovative, Texas-based companies from the ground up," says Samantha Crispin, Baker Botts' technology sector chair, in the release. "One of the most intriguing aspects of these partnerships is the expected cross-pollination of our Texas and California ECVC practices and that the most promising companies will gain exposure to potential investors, including those in Silicon Valley."

From pitch competitions to panels, here's how Houstonians will be representing at SXSW. Marie Ketring/via sxsw.org

10 can't-miss events at SXSW featuring Houston speakers

South by the Bayou

Plenty of Houstonians, SXSW badge in hand, will be headed to Austin to network, learn, and share the stage with the rest of the festivals attendees. While InnovationMap has highlighted a few of the faces to be on the lookout for this weekend, here's a roundup of 10 events that have a Houston speaker or participant.

3/8 — Featured Session: Opening Speaker, Brené Brown

SXSW is starting right out of the gate with a Houstonian. Brene Brown, a research professor at the University of Houston, will be the keynote address. Her thoughtful talk will focus on community and one's sense of belonging.

The SXSW keynote address will be at 11 am on Friday, March 8, at the Austin Convention Center. Learn more.

3/8 — Hysteria No More: Data, Doctors and Women’s Health

Gone are the days that medical professionals dismiss women's health concerns as "hysteria," but there's still room for improvement on the matter. Three ob/gyns will talk about new ways women are finding health care solutions outside the doctor's office.

Rashmi Kudesia, physician at CCRM Fertility Houston, is one of the panelists, which occurs on Friday, March 8, at the JW Marriott. Learn more.

3/8 — Equitable Growth Ecosystems for Entrepreneurs panel

The country has an equity problem — especially when it comes to startups and funding. Nationally, venture capital funds are not distributed in a way that represents the populations diversity, so how does the industry right the course?

Grace Rodriguez of Impact Hub Houston is among the panel that will discuss this at 3:30 pm on Friday, March 8, at the Hilton Austin Downtown. Learn more.

3/9 — Austinpreneur: The Texas Startup Manifesto

Texas is among the growing innovation ecosystems in the world, but there's plenty of untapped potential. This Capital Factory panel will focus on taking Texas to the next level.

Lawson Gow, founder and CEO of The Cannon, will be a panelist at the event, which begins at 11 am on Saturday, March 9, at the Hilton Austin Downtown. Learn more.

3/9 — Startup Funding: From Apprenticeships to Professions

Venture capitalism has changed tenfold since its start. Looking back on the history of early stage funding can help predict where it's going — from Silicon Valley to every corner of the world.

Station Houston CEO Gabriella Rowe is on the panel, which will take place at 12:30 pm on Saturday, March 9, at the Hilton Austin Downtown. Learn more.

3/9 — Making the Fight Against Cancer Even More Personal

No one loves discussing cancer, but there's a large group of scientists who have to daily and they develop new technologies and innovations to help discover a cure for the deadly affliction.

James Allison, researcher at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and 2018 Nobel Prize recipient, will be on the panel discussing ways to innovate within cancer research. The program starts at 5 pm on Saturday, March 9, at the JW Marriott. Learn more.

3/10 — SXSW Pitch Presented by Cyndx Awards Ceremony

Two Houston startups are competing for an award in the 11th annual SXSW Pitch Event. Fluidity Technologies will be presenting as its drone controller, FT Aviator, in the Hyper-Connected Communities category on Saturday, March 9, at 5 pm, and Zibrio SmartScale, which is in the Health and Wearable category, will present on Sunday, March 10, at 5 pm.

The pitch awards will take place at 6:30 pm on Sunday, March 10, at the Hilton Austin Downtown. Learn more.

3/11 — Tech Diversity Report Card 2019

Is diversity and inclusion basically just a myth in technology? Is it something that's attainable at this point, and what can the industry do to make that happen? A group of panelists discuss based on their experience and observations.

Heidi Hoover, head of office at Houston-based Flanders Investment & Trade, will be a member of the panel, which occurs on Monday, March 11, at 5 pm, at Capital Factory. Learn more.

3/11 — Angel Investor Meetup

Calling all acting and aspiring investors — it's time to rally. Two Texas investors are gathering the troops to discuss trends and opportunities in the state's — and the world's — investment sector.

Samantha Lewis of Houston-based GOOSE Society of Texas will be one of the hosts of the meetup, which takes place on Monday, March 11, at 5 p.m, at the Fairmont Hotel. Learn more.

3/12 — AI & IoT Panel and Emerging Company Showcase

Houston-based Baker Botts and Global Corporate Venturing are setting the stage for emerging tech companies to shine. The event includes a panel, a showcase, and an evening of networking.

James McKell, of Chevron Technology Ventures, is representing Houston on the panel, which begins at 2 pm on Tuesday, March 12, at Hotel Van Zandt. Learn more.

Honorable mentions


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CultureMap Emails are Awesome

Documentary featuring Houston Nobel Prize winner to air on PBS

to-watch list

Not all heroes wear capes. In fact, our current coronavirus heroes are donning face masks as they save lives. One local health care hero has a different disease as his enemy, and you'll soon be able to stream his story.

Dr. James "Jim" Allison won the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his work in battling cancer by treating the immune system — rather than the tumor. Allison, who is the chair of Immunology and executive director of the Immunotherapy Platform at MD Anderson Cancer Center, has quietly and often, singularly, waged war with cancer utilizing this unique approach.

The soft-spoken trailblazer is the subject of an award-winning documentary, Jim Allison: Breakthrough, which will air on PBS and its streaming channels on Monday, April 27 at 9 pm (check local listings for channel information). Lauded as "the most cheering film of the year" by the Washington Post, the film follows Allison's personal journey to defeat cancer, inspired and driven by the disease killed his mother.

Breakthrough is narrated by Woody Harrelson and features music by Willie Nelson, adding a distinct hint of Texana. (The film was a star at 2019's South by Southwest film festival.) The documentary charts Alice, Texas native as he enrolls at the University of Texas, Austin and ultimately, cultivates an interest in T cells and the immune system — and begins to frequent Austin's legendary music scene. Fascinated by the immune system's power to protect the body from disease, Allison's research soon focuses on how it can be used to treat cancer.

Viewers will find Allison charming, humble, and entertaining: the venerable doctor is also an accomplished blues harmonica player. Director Bill Haney weaves Allison's personal story with the medical case of Sharon Belvin, a patient diagnosed with melanoma in 2004 who soon enrolled in Allison's clinical trials. Belvin has since been entirely cancer-free, according to press materials.

"We are facing a global health challenge that knows no boundaries or race or religion, and we are all relying on gifted and passionate scientists and healthcare workers to contain and ultimately beat this thing," said Haney, in a statement. "Jim Allison and the unrelenting scientists like him are my heroes – and I'll bet they become yours!"

Jim Allison: Breakthrough premieres on Independent Lens at 9 pm Monday, April 27, on PBS, PBS.org, and the PBS Video App.

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This article originally ran on CultureMap.

Houston Methodist tech hub focuses on telemedicine training amid COVID-19 outbreak

virtual care

Houston Methodist's recently opened its new Center for Innovation's Technology Hub in January, and the new wing has already been challenged by a global pandemic — one that's validating a real need for telemedicine.

The 3,500-square-foot tech testing ground was renovated from an 18-room patient wing and showcases new digital health technologies like virtual reality, ambient listening, wearables, voice control, and more. The hub was focused on giving tours to medical professionals and executives to get them excited about health tech, but in the middle of March, Josh Sol, administrative director of Innovation and Ambulatory Clinical Systems at Houston Methodist, says they saw a greater need for the space.

"We turned the technology hub into a training center where physicians could come on site and learn telemedicine," Sol says. "We had some foresight from our leadership who thought that telemedicine was going to be heavily utilized in order to protect our patients who might go into isolation based on the outbreak."

The hub has trained over 500 physicians — both onsite and digitally. Sol says that at the start of March, there were 66 providers offering virtual care, and by March 25, there were over 900 providers operating virtually. On March 12, Houston Methodist had 167 virtual visits, Sol says, and on March 25, they had 2,421. This new 2,000-plus number is now the daily average.

"Telemedicine is here to stay now with the rapid adoption that just happened," Sol says. "The landscape will change tremendously."

Another way new technology has affected doctors' day-to-day work has been through tele-rounding — especially when it comes to interacting with patients with COVID-19.

"We are putting iPads in those rooms with Vidyo as the video application, and our physicians can tele-visit into that room," Sol says.

It's all hands on deck for the tech hub so that physicians who need support have someone to turn to. Sol says the hub used to have a two-person support team and now there are eight people in that role.

Sol says the iPads are a key technology for tele-rounding and patient care — and they are working with Apple directly to secure inventory. But other tech tools, like an artificial intelligence-backed phone system, an online symptom checker, and chatbots are key to engaging with patients.

"We're looking at how we can get our patients in the right place at the right time," Sol says. "It's very confusing right now. We're hoping we can streamline that for our patients."

The hub was designed so that in case of emergency, the display hospital rooms could be transitioned to patient care rooms. Sol says that would be a call made by Roberta Schwartz, executive vice president and chief innovation officer of Houston Methodist Hospital.