grande investment

Starbucks perks up Houston minority communities as part of $100 million investment

That next Frappuccino could help support BIPOC-owned businesses. Courtesy of Starbucks

The Bayou City will be a major beneficiary of a new initiative from Starbucks. The Seattle-based, global coffee giant announced that it has selected Houston as one of 12 U.S. cities that will receive funds from the Starbucks Community Resilience Fund.

Seeded with a $100 million investment, the fund will be used to support small businesses and community development projects in BIPOC (Black, indigenous, and people of color) neighborhoods. In addition to Houston, the program will launch in Atlanta, Detroit, Los Angeles, Miami, Minneapolis, New Orleans, New York City, Philadelphia, San Francisco Bay Area, Seattle, and Washington D.C.

"Starbucks has always been a company focused on caring for our partners, creating experiences for our customers and playing a positive role in our communities and throughout society," Kevin Johnson, Starbucks president and CEO, said in a statement. "We are excited to make this investment as it aligns with our mission and values and supports our aspiration to advance equity and opportunity in the communities we serve."

Working with partners such as the Opportunity Finance Network, Starbucks will select certain Community Development Financial Institutions that will receive funds. CDFIs focus on providing capital and promoting economic development. These institutions will then provide loans to small businesses and community development projects. In addition to money, CDFIs offer mentorship and flexible repayment terms that help projects become successful.

Specific Houston beneficiaries are still unknown at this time, but the funds have the potential to benefit a diverse array of projects, including those focused on addressing the impacts of climate change and investments in neighborhoods that are overlooked by traditional lenders.

For example, as part of a $10 million investment in four, Chicago-based CDFIs, Starbucks helped fund Green Era Sustainability's campus project that includes a 2-acre clean energy generation facility, an urban farm, green houses, an outdoor fresh produce market, a visitor center with classrooms for community activities, and a STEM education center. The project will create 247 construction jobs and 25 permanent jobs in Chicago's Auburn Gresham neighborhood.

"Given the severe impact of the pandemic on the long-disinvested communities CCLF serves, our lending is more important than ever to help these communities grow and thrive," said Bob Tucker, COO for the Chicago Community Loan Fund. "Our customers have urgent needs, and Starbucks investment in CCLF will help tremendously in bringing them the resources they need."

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This article originally ran on CultureMap.

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Building Houston

 
 

Asma Mirza joins the Houston Innovators Podcast to explain how a pandemic pivot turned into a global health opportunity. Photo courtesy

In the span of a couple years, a Houston startup went from innovating a way for patients with degenerative eye diseases to see better to creating a portable and affordable breath-based diagnostics tool worthy of a prestigious grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates foundation.

Steradian Technologies, founded in 2018, set out to create human super-sight via proprietary optics. In early 2020, the company was getting ready to start testing the device and fundraising. Then, the pandemic hit, knocking the company completely off course.

Co-founder and CEO of the company, Asma Mirza, says on this week's Houston Innovators Podcast that the Steradian co-founders discussed how their optic technology could detect diseases. Something just clicked, and the RUMI device was born.

"We are from Houston, Texas, which is one of the most diverse and accessible cities in the country, and we were having trouble with basic diagnostic accessibility. It was taking too long, it was complicated, and people were getting sick and didn't know if they were positive or negative," Mirza says on the show. "That's when we pivoted the company and decided we were going to pivot the company and use optics to detect diseases in breath."

Fast forward two years and the company has been recognized by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation with a grant to sport the development of the tool — which costs about the same price as a latte to make. The impact for global health is huge, Mirza says, allowing for people to test their breath for diseases from their own homes in the same time it takes to take your temperature.

"You blow into a cartrige and we're able to take the air from your breath into a liquid sample," Mirza says, explaining how the device uses photons to produce quick results. "It's wild that we still don't have something like that yet."

She shares more details about the grant and the future applications for the technology — as well as the role Houston and local organizations have had on the company — on the podcast. Listen to the interview below — or wherever you stream your podcasts — and subscribe for weekly episodes.


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