grande investment

Starbucks perks up Houston minority communities as part of $100 million investment

That next Frappuccino could help support BIPOC-owned businesses. Courtesy of Starbucks

The Bayou City will be a major beneficiary of a new initiative from Starbucks. The Seattle-based, global coffee giant announced that it has selected Houston as one of 12 U.S. cities that will receive funds from the Starbucks Community Resilience Fund.

Seeded with a $100 million investment, the fund will be used to support small businesses and community development projects in BIPOC (Black, indigenous, and people of color) neighborhoods. In addition to Houston, the program will launch in Atlanta, Detroit, Los Angeles, Miami, Minneapolis, New Orleans, New York City, Philadelphia, San Francisco Bay Area, Seattle, and Washington D.C.

"Starbucks has always been a company focused on caring for our partners, creating experiences for our customers and playing a positive role in our communities and throughout society," Kevin Johnson, Starbucks president and CEO, said in a statement. "We are excited to make this investment as it aligns with our mission and values and supports our aspiration to advance equity and opportunity in the communities we serve."

Working with partners such as the Opportunity Finance Network, Starbucks will select certain Community Development Financial Institutions that will receive funds. CDFIs focus on providing capital and promoting economic development. These institutions will then provide loans to small businesses and community development projects. In addition to money, CDFIs offer mentorship and flexible repayment terms that help projects become successful.

Specific Houston beneficiaries are still unknown at this time, but the funds have the potential to benefit a diverse array of projects, including those focused on addressing the impacts of climate change and investments in neighborhoods that are overlooked by traditional lenders.

For example, as part of a $10 million investment in four, Chicago-based CDFIs, Starbucks helped fund Green Era Sustainability's campus project that includes a 2-acre clean energy generation facility, an urban farm, green houses, an outdoor fresh produce market, a visitor center with classrooms for community activities, and a STEM education center. The project will create 247 construction jobs and 25 permanent jobs in Chicago's Auburn Gresham neighborhood.

"Given the severe impact of the pandemic on the long-disinvested communities CCLF serves, our lending is more important than ever to help these communities grow and thrive," said Bob Tucker, COO for the Chicago Community Loan Fund. "Our customers have urgent needs, and Starbucks investment in CCLF will help tremendously in bringing them the resources they need."

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This article originally ran on CultureMap.

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Building Houston

 
 

As of this week, Lara Cottingham is the chief of staff at Greentown Labs. Photo via LinkedIn

The country's largest climatetech startup incubator has made a strategic new hire.

Lara Cottingham is the new chief of staff for Greentown Labs, a Boston-area company that opened in Houston earlier this year. Cottingham previously served as the city of Houston's chief sustainability officer and the chief of staff for the city's Administration and Regulatory Affairs Department for the past seven years. In her new role, Cottingham will oversee the day-to-day operations and communications for Greentown's CEO Emily Reichert, along with key stakeholder engagements and strategic initiatives for the incubator.

"Lara brings a tremendous wealth of knowledge and experience to our team from her dynamic leadership role at the City of Houston," says Reichert in a news release. "Her breadth of knowledge in sustainability, climate, and the energy transition, and her expertise in regulatory and stakeholder aspects of the energy industry, will be incredibly valuable to our team and community."

Under her leadership at the city of Houston, Cottingham was the chief author of Houston's Climate Action Plan, an initiative aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions in Houston, and getting the city to a point where it meets the Paris Agreement goal of carbon neutrality by 2050. Cottingham helped the city move to 100 percent renewable electricity, according to the release, and helped turn a 240-acre landfill into the nation's largest urban solar farm.

"In leading the Climate Action Plan, Lara helped spark Houston's leadership in what has become a global energy transition and was a passionate advocate for climate action in Houston," says Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner in the release. "While she will be missed, this new role will only strengthen our partnership with Greentown. I look forward to working with Emily, Lara, and the Greentown team to meet our climate goals and make Houston the energy capital of the future."

Before her work at the city, Cottingham worked at Hill+Knowlton Strategies' Houston office range of clients across the energy sector. Earlier in her career, she served as communications director for two congressmen in the U.S. House of Representatives. She began her work with the city in 2014.

"In working with Mayor Turner and Climate Mayors across the U.S., I saw how important partnerships are to helping cities decarbonize," says Cottingham in the release. "There is no better partner or place for climate action at work than Greentown Labs. Greentown is 100 percent committed to attracting and nurturing the energy companies of the future and making Houston the energy transition capital of the world. I'm excited to join the team and see how climatetech can help cities reach their climate goals."

Greentown Labs first announced its entrance into the Houston market last summer. The new 40,000-square-foot facility in Midtown across the street from The Ion opened its prototyping and wet lab space, offices, and community gathering areas for about 50 startup companies opened in April. Greentown was founded in 2011 in Somerville, Massachusetts, and has supported more than 400 startups, which have raised more than $1.5 billion in funding.

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