grande investment

Starbucks perks up Houston minority communities as part of $100 million investment

That next Frappuccino could help support BIPOC-owned businesses. Courtesy of Starbucks

The Bayou City will be a major beneficiary of a new initiative from Starbucks. The Seattle-based, global coffee giant announced that it has selected Houston as one of 12 U.S. cities that will receive funds from the Starbucks Community Resilience Fund.

Seeded with a $100 million investment, the fund will be used to support small businesses and community development projects in BIPOC (Black, indigenous, and people of color) neighborhoods. In addition to Houston, the program will launch in Atlanta, Detroit, Los Angeles, Miami, Minneapolis, New Orleans, New York City, Philadelphia, San Francisco Bay Area, Seattle, and Washington D.C.

"Starbucks has always been a company focused on caring for our partners, creating experiences for our customers and playing a positive role in our communities and throughout society," Kevin Johnson, Starbucks president and CEO, said in a statement. "We are excited to make this investment as it aligns with our mission and values and supports our aspiration to advance equity and opportunity in the communities we serve."

Working with partners such as the Opportunity Finance Network, Starbucks will select certain Community Development Financial Institutions that will receive funds. CDFIs focus on providing capital and promoting economic development. These institutions will then provide loans to small businesses and community development projects. In addition to money, CDFIs offer mentorship and flexible repayment terms that help projects become successful.

Specific Houston beneficiaries are still unknown at this time, but the funds have the potential to benefit a diverse array of projects, including those focused on addressing the impacts of climate change and investments in neighborhoods that are overlooked by traditional lenders.

For example, as part of a $10 million investment in four, Chicago-based CDFIs, Starbucks helped fund Green Era Sustainability's campus project that includes a 2-acre clean energy generation facility, an urban farm, green houses, an outdoor fresh produce market, a visitor center with classrooms for community activities, and a STEM education center. The project will create 247 construction jobs and 25 permanent jobs in Chicago's Auburn Gresham neighborhood.

"Given the severe impact of the pandemic on the long-disinvested communities CCLF serves, our lending is more important than ever to help these communities grow and thrive," said Bob Tucker, COO for the Chicago Community Loan Fund. "Our customers have urgent needs, and Starbucks investment in CCLF will help tremendously in bringing them the resources they need."

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This article originally ran on CultureMap.

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Building Houston

 
 

this one's for the ladies

Texas named a top state for women-led startups

A new report finds that the Lone Star State is ideal for female entrepreneurs. Photo via Getty Images

Who runs the world? According to Merchant Maverick's inaugural Best States for "Women-Led Startups'' study, Texas is a great place for women to be in charge.

The Lone Star state cracked the top 10 on the list, earning a No. 6 spot according to the small business reviews and financial services company, which based the study on eight key statistics about this growing segment of the economy. Colorado (at No. 1), Washington, Virginia, Florida, and Montana were the only states to beat out Texas on the rankings—leading the Merchant Maverick team to conclude that "the part of the country that lies west of the Mississippi is great for startups led by women entrepreneurs."

Women-led startups in Texas received $365 billion in VC funding in the last five years, the report found. This is the seventh largest total among U.S. states. Too, about 20 percent of Texans are employed at woman-led firms, which is the fifth highest percentage among states. Roughly 35 percent of employers in Texas are led by women.

A few other key findings that work in female founders' favor: The startup survival rate in Texas is nearly 80 percent. And a lack of state income tax "doesn't hurt either," the report says.

Still there are shortcomings. On a per capita basis, only 1.27 percent of Texas women run their own business. The average income for self-employed women is also relatively low ranking among states, coming in around $55,907 and landing at 31st among others.

This is not the first time Texas has been lauded as a land of opportunity for women entrepreneurs. A 2019 study named it the best state for business opportunities for women. Houston too has proven to support success for the demographic. The Bayou City was named in separate studies a best city for female entrepreneurs to start a business and to see it grow.

Still, as many findings have concluded, the realities of the pandemic loom for all startups and small business owners. The Merchant Maverick study was careful to add: "The pandemic has changed the economic landscape over the past year, and often for the worse.

"This means that not every metric may be able to accurately gauge how a state might fare amidst the pandemic," the report continues. "To help factor in COVID's impact, we included some metrics that take 2020 into account, but it will be a while until we get a full picture of the pandemic's devastation.""

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