Crystal ball

Overheard: Experts weigh in on what the energy industry will look like in 2050 at Houston summit

From fossil fuels to clean and sustainable energy, here's what experts postulate the industry will look like in 2050. Natalie Harms/InnovationMap

There are a lot of things up in the air within the energy industry when you look at the next 40 years — clean energy, regulation regarding fossil fuels, carbon footprint, and so much more.

At the Society of Petroleum Engineers' inaugural SPE Dot Energy Leadership Summit, the big question was what does 2050 look like for the industry. Tasked with the discussion were three energy leaders — Deanna Zhang, energy tech investment banking associate at TudorPickering Holt & Co., Lees Rodionov, vice president of Global Stewardship at Schlumberger, and David R. Hall, managing director of Hall Labs — on a panel moderated by Gabriella Rowe, CEO of Station Houston.

The panel, which took place on August 15 at MATCH, discussed all the variables and what their potential theories are for how time will change oil and gas. Of course, no one knows for sure. If they did, they wouldn't be sharing it, would they?

"It's very hard I think to capture all the things that will play out by 2050, and honestly, if I knew with any amount of certainty what would happen, I wouldn't be talking about it in public," Zhang says. "I'd be in a basement somewhere, making a company that would make a trillion dollars."

Fair enough. Here are some other overheard quotes from the discussion in case you missed it.

“I think we’ll face the fact that we’ve got to be totally clean and solve the emissions problem and do a complete full cycle. It’ll mean lots of innovation, but I certainly see the capability to get it done.”

David R. Hall, managing director of Hall Labs.

“When it comes to bridging the efficiency debate and the green and clean debate, that will be something that by 2050 we will have bridged.”

— Deanna Zhang, energy tech investment banking associate at Tudor Pickering Holt & Co. Currently, she says the industry is split. "Right now we are trying to optimize for two objectives. The industry is divided."

“I think that one of the challenges actually is that it’s an idea of ‘us and them,’ and energy is a ‘we.’ Everyone has a role to play.”

Lees Rodionov, vice president of Global Stewardship at Schlumberger. She emphasized that it's the energy industry — oil and gas is just one part, and it's where there's a lot of money. O&G does have opportunities for carbon neutral development.

“The opportunity for the oil and gas industry is to recognize the problems and then announce solutions itself. If the industry doesn’t, regulators will."

— Hall says on moving the industry toward a cleaner, greener future.

“In 50 years, we’ll find a way to survive, but it won’t be the same quality of life.”

— Zhang, when asked about the worst case scenario if the industry doesn't make big changes. She cites urbanization and a greater wealth gap as some things to expect.

"Stop saying 'oil and gas.' It's 'energy.'"

— Rodionov, when asked about bridging the gap between renewables and fossil fuels.

Ambassadors get to experience events like Family Fun Day. Photo courtesy of Texas Children's Hospital

For the last 10 years, a special group of Houstonians have been walking the walk when it comes to helping one of the city's most revered institutions and changing lives every day.

Ambassadors for Texas Children's Hospital have been supporting patients through philanthropic donations and active engagement, and now you can, too.

The program has three goals: compassion, philanthropy, and advocacy. Just as Texas Children's strives to provide children and women with the best possible care, Ambassadors gain firsthand experience of the hospital's compassionate spirit and work tirelessly to embody this commitment in their actions.

They have given millions of dollars to help meet the hospital's needs, providing support where it will have the greatest impact, as well as standing and speaking up for patients through their own contributions and enlisting others in the cause.

Ambassadors also have the opportunity to attend exclusive, behind-the-scenes educational and social events to learn more about the patients they serve. This includes gatherings like Ambassadors On Call, which can range from luncheons that feature special guest lecturers and renowned health experts to question-and-answer sessions with leading scientists and physicians to behind-the-scenes tours of operating rooms and research facilities.

Family Fun Day is another special event for Ambassadors. This annual "party with a purpose" is a family-focused event where Ambassadors celebrate their work on behalf of Texas Children's. The day is filled with unique activities and lots of opportunities to meet new friends and spend time with old ones. To teach the next generation about philanthropy, the price of admission is one donated book.

To celebrate the successes of the year, Ambassadors gather at a member's home to share the spirit of the season. The holiday party also includes the presentation of the group's annual check to Texas Children's and the announcement of the coming year's philanthropic focus.

Ambassadors enjoy access to the hospital's navigation line services for assistance with referrals, appointments, and health and safety information for children — an invaluable resource for parents and grandparents alike.

For more information about becoming an Ambassador, visit texaschildrens.org/ambassadors or call 832-824-6900.

The holiday party includes the presentation of the group's annual check to the hospital. Photo courtesy of Texas Children's Hospital

With Ambassadors On Call, you gain access to behind-the-scenes tours and guest lecturers. Photo courtesy of Texas Children's Hospital