Money moves

Houston energy services company closes $7.2 million series A round

Houston-based Sourcewater provides energy-water data technology for oil and gas companies. Getty Images

A Houston company has some fresh funds to spark some growth. Sourcewater Inc., which specializes in oilfield water intelligence, has closed its series A round at $7.2 million. Bison Technologies, Marubeni Corp., and major energy family offices in Houston, Midland, Dallas, and Oklahoma City contributed to the round.

"For every barrel of oil produced in the Permian Basin there are more than ten barrels of associated water that are sourced, recycled, transported, and disposed of," says Joshua Adler, founding chief executive of Sourcewater, in a news release. "When America became the world's leading energy producer last year, it also became the world's leading water producer, times ten. Water management is now the majority of upstream energy production cost, and water sourcing, recycling and disposal capacity is the primary constraint on America's energy future."

Sourcewater's data-driven technology incorporates satellite imagery analytics, government databases, market research, IoT sensors, as well as its own online water marketplace to provide important data to its customers.

"Sourcewater has worked for over five years to become the trusted market intelligence provider at the center of the energy-water nexus," Adler continues.

The funds will go toward further developing the company's technology.

"With this funding we will continue to build the best data science and engineering team in Houston, develop the most timely, complete and accurate data gathering and analysis systems for upstream water and energy markets, and deliver even more value and insight to our customers," Adler says in the release. "Our whole team is grateful that we have been able to earn the trust and respect of so many of the leading companies in our industry, and we are excited to have the resources to serve them even better."

Oklahoma City-based Bison Technologies, which contributed to the round, is among Oklahoma's largest water infrastructure, logistics, and solutions providers.

"Having built the top water midstream, infrastructure and logistics company in Oklahoma, we are well aware of the critical importance of accurate, timely and complete water market data for our business and investment decisions," says CEO North Whipple, in the release. "Sourcewater is without question the innovation leader in the oilfield water data space, and we are excited to support their growth with our strategic capital, expertise and relationships."

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Building Houston

 
 

"The Soccer Innovation Institute presents the ultimate opportunity to redefine the player and fan experience, and develop a lasting legacy for the long-term benefit of the FIFA World Cup." Photo via Paul Duron/Wikipedia

Houston is kicking up its 2026 FIFA World Cup bid by a notch or two with a new innovative initiative.

The Houston 2026 World Cup Bid Committee on October 14 committed to establishing the nonprofit Soccer Innovation Institute if Houston becomes a host city for the FIFA World Cup.

"The institute will rely on Houston's spirit of innovation to create a united community investment in building a legacy that goes well beyond the city," according to a news release announcing the potential formation of the nonprofit.

The soccer institute, made up of a network of experts and leaders from various global organizations, would conduct specialized think tanks and would support a series of community programs.

"As the energy capital of the world, the global leader in medicine, the universal headquarters for NASA, and the home to numerous sports tech companies, Houston has an abundance of resources that are unmatched by other cities," Houston billionaire John Arnold, chairman of the 2026 bid committee, says in a news release. "By bringing these organizations together under one umbrella, the Soccer Innovation Institute presents the ultimate opportunity to redefine the player and fan experience, and develop a lasting legacy for the long-term benefit of the FIFA World Cup."

Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner says the institute would align with the city's efforts to build a strong ecosystem for innovation, along with its passion for soccer.

"Houston is recognized as a leader in technology and innovation. We have many innovation hubs around the city that bring bright minds into collaborative spaces where the whole is greater than the sum of the parts," the mayor says.

Held every four years, the World Cup assembles national men's soccer teams from around the world in one of the most planet's most watched sporting events. The traditional 32-team tournament will expand to 48 teams in 2026. After 2026, the World Cup might be staged every two years.

Among those collaborating on the Houston 2026 bid are NRG, the Texas Medical Center, Shell, Chevron, the U.S. Soccer Foundation, the Council for Responsible Sport, the Houston Dynamo, the Houston Dash, the City of Houston, Harris County, and Houston First.

The FIFA World Cup 2026 will be played in 16 cities across the U.S., Mexico, and Canada. Houston and Dallas are among the 17 cities vying to become a U.S. host. A final decision is expected in the first half of 2022. If Houston is selected, it will host six World Cup games at NRG Stadium.

Between October 21 and November 1, World Cup delegates will visit eight cities in the running to be North American hosts: Houston, Dallas, Kansas City, Cincinnati, Denver, San Francisco, Seattle, and Monterrey, Mexico.

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