health care tech

Houston med device company secures first patient for clinical trial

Saranas has enrolled its first patient in its clinical trials. Photo courtesy of Saranas

The first patient has been enrolled in a nationwide clinical trial that will evaluate the safety of Houston-based Saranas’ device for early detection of bleeding during minimally invasive heart procedures.

The initial patient was enrolled earlier this month at Morristown Medical Center in Morristown, New Jersey. The trial will eventually enroll up to 265 patients across the U.S.

Saranas’ Early Bird Bleed Monitoring System aids the detection of bleeding during high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) procedures using mechanical circulatory support (MCS). In the clinical trial, the MCS will be the Impella heart pump.

PCI refers to minimally invasive procedures for opening clogged coronary arteries. MCS boosts heart function when the organ can’t perform at its best. The trial will test the ability of the Early Bird Bleed Monitoring System to detect serious or potentially fatal bleeding.

“As the field of minimally invasive, catheter-based procedures continues to advance, patient safety is paramount,” Dr. Babar Basir, director of acute mechanical circulatory support at Detroit’s Henry Ford Health System and co-principal investigator of SAFE-MCS, says in a news release. “This study will collect comprehensive procedural data in patients undergoing PCI with MCS.”

The data then will be reviewed to determine how real-time monitoring of bleeding can improve a patient’s health, Basir says.

Dr. Philippe Généreux, co-director of the Structural Heart Program at Morristown Medical Center, is the other co-principal investigator for the clinical trial.

“SAFE-MCS is the first prospective trial focused exclusively on the impact of integrating bleed monitoring in large-bore access for high-risk protected PCI patients,” says James Reinstein, president and CEO of Saranas, a medical device startup.

About one-fifth of patients will experience bleeding complications during “large bore” blood vessel procedures such as percutaneous MCS, transcatheter aortic valve replacement, and endovascular aneurysm repair. The estimated cost of one bleeding complication during these large-bore procedures is $18,000, adding up to an annual cost of $729 million for health care providers.

The Early Bird Bleed Monitoring System is the first and only device approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for real-time monitoring of bleeding problems during endovascular procedures for repair of blood vessels.

Saranas’ collaborators in the clinical trial are Proxima Clinical Research, a Houston-based contract research organization, and South Korea’s CardioVascular Research Foundation. The Early Bird study is expected to be completed by January 2023.

Since being founded in 2013, Saranas has collected $31.5 million in funding. This includes a $12.8 million Series B round that Saranas received this summer from Chicago-based Baird Capital and Austin-based S3 Ventures.

The Early Bird device was developed at Houston’s Texas Heart Institute. The FDA approved the device in 2019.

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