underground business

Houston company creates platform to help protect people's mineral rights

A group of Houston entrepreneurs have created a technology to advocate for mineral rights owners. Photo via Getty Images

When a landman used predatory tactics to lure his grandma into selling her mineral rights, a Houston entrepreneur stepped in, and now he's empowering landowners with knowledge and advocating for transparency for mineral buying in the oil and gas industry.

"Whether a potential seller conducts a sale with us or not, our goal is to educate families through RevereNet so they can understand what is happening in the market and protect themselves financially," says Colton Robey, co-founder and senior vice president of Revere Resources.

Robey teamed up with other leaders in the oil, tech, and finance industries to found Revere Resources to help landowners like his grandmother make the right decisions for their assets. Their recently launched online resource, RevereNet, provides a dollar figure and geographic view of an owner's mineral composition along with the historical value and extensive data on wells and well locations, giving owners the information they need to get the best deal.

"Our team has all worked in different capacities at different private equity-backed mineral rights funds," says Robey. "And it all came together after somebody tried to buy my grandmother's mineral rights unjustly, it wasn't until that moment that I realized that bad actors are prevalent in the industry."

Robey and his partners are guided by the guiding principle of transparency and honesty, even going as far as helping clients get better deals with other mineral buying companies if they beat their price.

"The data we collect allows us to gain a whole picture of the deal, so often of times we're not their natural highest bidder," says Robey. "However, we know the ins and out of the business and have helped our clients find better deals."

With RevereNet, they add a whole new layer of technology that is seldom seen in the archaic mineral rights sector, allowing landowners to check the value of their assets as easy as checking their stock portfolio.

"We believe this market is ripe for new technology," says Robey. "There are a lot of dinosaurs in this industry that need change, we collect tons of data and our online resource gives valuable information for free 365 days a week and 24/7 which definitely makes us more tech-driven than a lot of folks."

The project, which was already in production when the coronavirus pandemic changed the way we live and work, was rolled out quickly to meet landowner's immediate needs for data.

"We knew that during this time on uncertainty, a lot of people might be looking to divest," says Robey. "We're not brokers or flippers, we're long-term investors, and as mineral rights owners ourselves, I think that puts us in a different boat that other mineral rights companies."

With the successful launch of RevereNet, the team hopes to expand their efforts into new frontiers — getting this service into the hands of everyone in Texas.

"We know that only comes with people getting comfortable with learning what it is they own," says Robey. "We hope that over time we can educate landowners that can give them the confidence to manage their assets in the best financially beneficial way possible for them and their families."

The Revere Resources team wants to get all Texans on RevereNet. Photo courtesy of Revere

Trending News

Building Houston

 
 

SurgWise is giving surgical teams the right support for hiring. Photo via Getty Images

A surgeon spends over a decade in school and residency perfecting their medical skills, but that education doesn't usually include human resources training. Yet, when it comes to placing candidates into surgical programs, the hiring responsibilities fell on the shoulders of surgeons.

Aimee Gardner, who has her PhD in organized psychology, saw this inefficiency first hand.

"I worked in a large surgery department in Dallas right out of graduate school and quickly learned how folks are selected into residency and fellowship programs and all the time that goes into it — time spent by physicians reviewing piles and piles of like paper applications and spending lots and lots and of hours interviewing like hundreds of candidates," Gardner tells InnovationMap. "I was just really shocked by the inefficiencies from just a business and workforce perspective."

And things have only gotten worse. There are more applicants hitting the scene every year and they are applying to more hospitals and programs. Future surgeons used to apply for 20 or so programs — now it’s more like 65 on average. According to her research, Gardner says reviewing these applications cost lots of time and money, specifically $100,000 to fill five spots annually just up to the interviewing phase of the process.

Five years ago, Gardner came up with a solution to this “application fever,” as she describes, and all the inefficiencies, and founded SurgWise Consulting, where she serves as president and CEO.

"We help provide assessments to help screen competencies and attributes that people care about," Gardner says. "(Those) are really hard to assess, but really differentiate people who really thrive in training in their careers and people who don't."

Aimee Gardner is the CEO and president of Houston-based SurgWise. Photo via surgwise.com

These are the non-technical skills, like the professionalism, interpersonal skills, and communication. While SurgWise began as a service-oriented consulting company, the company is now ready to tap technology to expand upon its solution. The work started out of Houston Methodist, and SurgWise is still working with surgery teams there. She says they've accumulated tons of data that can be leveraged and streamlined.

"We're now pivoting from a very intimate client approach to a more scalable offering. Every year we assess essentially around 80 percent of all the people applying to be future surgeons — those in pediatric surgery, vascular surgery, and more,” Gardner says. “We’ve used kind of the last five years of data and experiences to create a more scalable, easy-to-integrate, and off-the-shelf solution.”

Gardner says her solution is critical for providing more equity in the hiring process.

“One of our goals was to create more equitable opportunities and platforms to assess folks because many of the traditional tools and processes that most people use in this space have lots of opportunity for bias and a high potential for disadvantaging individuals from underrepresented groups," she says. "For example, letters of recommendation are often a very insider status. If you went to some Ivy League or your parents were in health care and they know someone, you have that step up from a networking and socioeconomic status standpoint."

Personal statements and test scores are also inequitable, because they tend to be better submissions if people have money for coaching.

SurgWise hopes to lower the number of programs future surgeons apply to too to further streamline the process. She hopes to do this through an app and web tool that can matchmake people to the right program.

“Our ultimate goal is to create a platform for applicants to obtain a lot more information about the various places to which they apply to empower them to make more informed decisions, so that they don't have to apply to a hundred places," Gardner says. "We want to essentially create a match-style app that allows them to input some data and tell us 'here's what I'm looking for here are my career goals and any preferences I have.'”

While that tool is down the road, Gardner says SurgWise is full speed ahead toward launching the data-driven hiring platform. The bootstrapped company hopes to raise early venture funding this summer in order to hire and grow its team.

“As we continue to consider this app that I talked about and some of the other opportunities to scale to other specialties we're gonna start looking for a series A funding later this summer.”

Trending News