making moves

Houston energy startup acquired by growing tech company

Trent Crow, founder and president (left), and Paul Paras, founder and vice president, and the rest of the Real Simple Energy team have moved over to Arcardia with the acquisition. Photo courtesy of Real Simple Energy

February's massive winter weather disaster underscored the fragile availability and volatile cost of electricity in the Houston area and throughout Texas. Just a month after the calamity, a Washington, D.C.-based company has scooped up Houston-based Real Simple Energy to help put power back in the hands of electricity consumers in Texas.

Arcadia, a tech company that connects U.S. homeowners and renters to renewable energy, said March 17 that it had purchased Real Simple Energy. Terms of the deal for the three-year-old startup weren't disclosed.

Real Simple Energy's automated platform matches power usage with the lowest rates in the Texas marketplace to reduce electric bills. The company manages all facets of a customer's monthly power bills.

Trent Crow, co-founder and CEO of Real Simply Energy, says all eight of the company's employees have moved over to Arcadia and more workers will be hired soon. The company has maintained a mix of office and remote workers. Arcadia will look for Houston office space later this year, Crow says.

"Expansion plans include doing more of what we're doing now and offering more features for customers," says Crow, who now is Arcadia's general manager of energy services in Texas.

Aside from Crow, co-founders of Real Simple Energy are Paul Paras and Matt Herpich.

Real Simple Energy says its customers save an average of 36 percent, or $548 a year, on electricity. That figure is based on the power bill for a 2,300-square-foot home. The startup says its fixed-rate and fixed-bill plans aren't subject to the types of spikes in power prices that many Texans experienced during February's winter weather disaster.

"Recent events in the Texas market prove that customers shouldn't be exposed to wholesale or variable rates, and want an energy advocate to protect them," Kiran Bhatraju, founder and CEO of Arcadia, says in a release. "Both Arcadia and Real Simple Energy recognize the challenges Texas homeowners and renters have historically faced in the energy-buying process, and we remain committed to removing these confusing barriers. We'll always be on the customer's side, focusing on the best rate and protecting our customers from bad actors."

Crow says the struggle to bring down energy costs at his home prompted him to start the company. He spent several years as a wholesale power trader at JPMorgan Chase.

"The deregulated energy industry, especially in Texas, has underserved customers and, as a result, most customers overpay for electricity and receive poor customer service. Using technology, we are helping customers realize the promise of deregulation and always get the best fixed rates available," Crow says in a release.

This deal represents the first acquisition for Arcadia, founded in 2014. In partnership with 125 utilities in 50 states, Arcadia oversees 4.5 terawatt hours (4.5 trillion kilowatt hours) of residential demand for energy. It's the biggest manager of residential solar in the U.S.

Arcadia has raised $70.5 million in funding, according to Crunchbase.

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Building Houston

 
 

For over a year now, scientists have been testing wastewater for COVID-19. Now, the public can access that information. Photo via Getty Images

In 2020, a group of researchers began testing Houston's wastewater to collect data to help identify trends at the community level. Now, the team's work has been rounded up to use as an online resource.

The Houston Health Department and Rice University launched the dashboard on September 22. The information comes from samples collected from the city's 39 wastewater treatment plants and many HISD schools.

"This new dashboard is another tool Houstonians can use to gauge the situation and make informed decisions to protect their families," says Dr. Loren Hopkins, chief environmental science officer for the health department and professor in the practice of statistics at Rice University, in a news release. "A high level of virus in your neighborhood's wastewater means virus is spreading locally and you should be even more stringent about masking up when visiting public places."

The health department, Houston Water, Rice University, and Baylor College of Medicine originally collaborated on the wastewater testing. Baylor microbiologist Dr. Anthony Maresso, director of BCM TAILOR Labs, led a part of the research.

"This is not Houston's first infectious disease crisis," Maresso says in an earlier news release. "Wastewater sampling was pioneered by Joseph Melnick, the first chair of Baylor's Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology, to get ahead of polio outbreaks in Houston in the 1960s. This work essentially ushered in the field of environmental virology, and it began here at Baylor. TAILOR Labs is just continuing that tradition by providing advanced science measures to support local public health intervention."

It's an affordable way to track the virus, says experts. People with COVID-19 shed viral particles in their feces, according to the release, and by testing the wastewater, the health department can measure important infection rate changes.

The dashboard, which is accessible online now, is color-coded by the level of viral load in wastewater samples, as well as labeled with any recent trend changes. Houstonians can find the interactive COVID-19 wastewater monitoring dashboard, vaccination sites, testing sites, and more information at houstonemergency.org/covid19.

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