Not so green

New report lands Texas among 10 worst states for the environment

Texas has one of the worst environmental records in the U.S., a new study finds. Photo courtesy of Union of Concerned Scientists

Everything is bigger in Texas, even the negative impact it has on the environment, a new study finds.

Ahead of Earth Day (April 22), personal finance site WalletHub analyzed all 50 states, looking at 27 metrics across three categories: environmental quality, eco-friendly behaviors, and climate-change contributions.

Texas' overall ranking is an abysmal No. 41, making it one of the least green places in America.

The Lone Star State comes in at No. 48 in environmental quality, No. 28 in eco-friendly behaviors, and No. 37 in climate-change contributions. Under climate-change contributions, WalletHub analyzed carbon-dioxide, methane, nitrous-oxide, and fluorinated greenhouse-gas emissions per capita. The higher the number, the worse a state performs in that category.

Despite an overall poor showing, Texas claims a few top spots in individual metrics, performing best in renewable portfolio standards (No. 1), states with electronic waste recycling programs (No. 1), and corporate clean energy procurement index score (No. 5). On the other side of the spectrum, Texas performs worst in the number of alternative-fuel stations per capita (No. 40), air quality (No. 41), water quality (No. 44), and energy consumption per capita (No. 45).

So why exactly is this a WalletHub story? What does this have to do with your money?

"Eco-friendliness and personal finance are related," the report says. "Our environmental and financial needs are the same in many areas: providing ourselves with sustainable, clean drinking water and food, for example. We also spend money through our own consumption and taxes in support of environmental security."

Vermont ranks first in environmentally friendliness, landing at No. 1 in environmental quality, No. 3 in eco-friendly behaviors, and No. 25 climate-change contributions.

Eight states have worse records than Texas: Oklahoma, Mississippi, Arkansas, Alabama, North Dakota, Wyoming, Kentucky, West Virginia, and Louisiana.

While not so green right now, Texas has made great strides in wind energy in recent years. The American Wind Energy Association's annual report for 2018 shows the Lone Star State is home to roughly one-fourth of all U.S. wind power production. If Texas were a country, the wind energy group says, it would rank fifth in the world for wind power capacity, with nearly 25,000 megawatts installed. And with nearly 7,000 megawatts of wind energy projects under construction or development at the end of 2018, Texas is adding more wind energy capacity than what all but two other states actually have installed.

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This story originally ran on CultureMap.

Startups fair well in Houston, a new study finds. Photo by Zview/Getty Images

Ten percent of the United States workforce — 15.3 million people — work for themselves, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. In honor of National Small Business Week, a recent study sought out the best cities for starting a business, and Houston came in at No. 13.

WalletHub, a personal financial website, used 19 key metrics — such as five-year business-survival rate and office-space affordability — to compare 100 cities in the U.S.

Houston ranked highest in the business environment category with a No. 4 ranking. This ranking considered startups per capita, average growth of business revenue, length of an average work week, etc.

The other two rankings were access to resources and business costs. For those, Houston ranked No. 55 and No. 67, respectively.

The population of Houstonians starting new companies is growing every year. According to the Greater Houston Partnership's data, the greater Houston area added 11,700 firms between 2013 to 2018 — an average addition of 2,340 per year.

Aside from the unclassified new businesses starting up in Houston, the most popular industries for new companies are restaurants, individual and family services, and computer systems design and related services, per the GHP. Within computer systems alone, the region added almost 700 new companies over the past five years.

In a city named the most diverse in the country, about one-third (31.6 percent) of all Houston firms are minority-owned, according to the GHP. Asians own 17.6 per­cent, Hispanics 10.1 percent, Blacks 3.5 percent, and Native Americans, Hawaiians and other groups 0.4 percent. Houston was recently ranked as a top city for minority entrepreneurial success.

Meanwhile, one in five firms (20.5 percent) is female-owned — one in seven (13.8 percent) is equally male/female-owned. While the data varies slightly, another recent study found that Houston had the 7th most startups with female owners.

Perhaps most telling for the WalletHub's findings is that the GHP reports that nearly two-thirds (63.6 percent) of all Houston em­ployers have been in business six years or more.

Texas, which was recently named the top state for female entrepreneurs, fared well overall in the WalletHub study, with seven cities in the top 20. Here's how the rest of the state ranked:

  • Austin came in at No. 4
  • Fort Worth took the No. 11 spot
  • Dallas secured the No. 15 rank
  • San Antonio ranked at No. 16
  • Irving came in at No. 17
  • Laredo was named No. 18
  • Lubbock missed the top 20, but took the No. 23 spot