Luxe life

New high-end workspace opens in Houston's Galleria area

Austin-based FIRMSPACE has opened its third location in Houston with a 32,000-square-foot space in BBVA Compass Plaza. Courtesy of FIRMSPACE

Houston's getting another high-end coworking space. FIRMSPACE, an Austin-based company, selected Houston as its third location.

With 32,000 square feet of space, FIRMSPACE Houston is open for business in BBVA Compass Plaza (2200 Post Oak Boulevard) on the 10th and 11th floors of the 22-story building. The company opened its first location in Austin, followed by a Denver location last December.

"This opening is particularly close to my heart given that I'm from here," says co-founder and CEO, Matt Ferstler, in a release. "We launched FIRMSPACE to serve an unmet need in the coworking market, and our Houston site is unlike anything we've ever done. I think it will exceed our members' expectations."

The space has the normal coworking office offerings — high-speed internet, standing desks, shared conference rooms and common areas — but takes the perks a step further with onsite dry cleaning, catered lunches, evening programing, and more. FIRMSPACE caters to lawyers, financial services firms, and remote corporate executives, according to the release, and members have access to the firm's other locations, which soon should include Atlanta, Dallas, Miami, New York City, Salt Lake City, and Washington D.C.

The building was designed by Houston-based architecture firm, Page, and was completed in 2014. Page design director, Jen Bussinger, oversaw FIRMSPACE's integration into the building.

"Since we're in the Energy Capital of the World, we drew our inspiration from curves and fractal shapes found within a geode stone for texture and natural rock formations for the color palette," says Bussinger in a release. "In the age of biophilia – the hypothesis that humans possess an innate tendency to seek connections with nature – we go out of our way to feature different representations of nature."

Uptown views

Courtesy of FIRMSPACE

The new FIRMSPACE Houston resides in BBVA Compass Plaza, which opened in 2014.

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Building Houston

 
 

This week's roundup of Houston innovators includes Richard Seline of the Resilience Innovation Hub, Deanna Zhang of Tudor, Pickering, and Holt, and Brad Hauser of Soliton. Courtesy photos

Editor's note: In the week's roundup of Houston innovators to know, I'm introducing you to three innovators across industries recently making headlines — from resilience technology to energy innovation.

Richard Seline, co-founder at the Houston-based Resilience Innovation Hub Collaboratory

Richard Seline of Houston-based Resilience Innovation Hub joins the Houston Innovators Podcast to discuss how it's time for the world to see Houston as the resilient city it is. Photo courtesy of ResilientH20

Richard Seline says on this week's episode of the Houston Innovators Podcast, that people are exhausted and these feelings are festering into frustration and anger — and calling for change. The things that need to change, Seline says, includes growing investment and innovation in resilience solutions.

"As a fourth generation Houstonian, it's just so hard to see my hometown get hit persistently with a lot of these weather and other type of disasters," Seline says.

These unprecedented disasters — which are of course occurring beyond Houston and Texas — have also sparked a growing interest in change for insurance companies that have lost a trillion dollars on the United States Gulf Coast over the past seven years, Seline says. Something has got to change regarding preparation and damage mitigation. Read more and stream the podcast.

Deanna Zhang, director of energy technology at Houston-based Tudor, Pickering, Holt & Co.

Deanna Zhang of Tudor, Pickering, Holt & Co. writes a response to the energy crisis that occured in Texas in February. Photo courtesy of TPH

Deanna Zhang specializes in energy tech, and what she witnessed from February's winter weather was basically an epic fail caused by a myriad of issues.

"But it's oversimplifying to say that the only solution to preventing another situation like this is continued or increased reliance on the oil and gas industry," she writes in a guest article for InnovationMap. "What last week ultimately demonstrated was the multitude of technology solutions that needs to scale up to provide us with the best energy reliability and availability." Read more.

Brad Hauser, CEO of Soliton

Houston-based Soliton can use its audio pulse technology to erase scars, cellulite, and tattoos. Photo courtesy of Soliton

A Houston company has created a technology that uses sound to make changes in human skin tissue. Soliton, led by Brad Hauser, is using audio pulses to make waves in the med-aesthetic industry. The company, which is licensed from the University of Texas on behalf of MD Anderson, announced that it had received FDA approval earlier this month for its novel and proprietary technology that can reduce the appearance of cellulite.

"The original indication was tattoo removal," Hauser says. "The sound wave can increase in speed whenever it hits a stiffer or denser material. And tattoo ink is denser, stiffer than the surrounding dermis. That allows a shearing effect of the sound wave to disrupt that tattoo ink and help clear tattoos."

According to Hauser, the team then turned to a second application for the technology in the short-term improvement in the appearance of cellulite. With the use of the technology, patients can undergo a relatively pain-free, 40- to 60-minute non-invasive session with no recovery time. Read more.

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