City of innovation

New data shows over half of Houston has an idea for a business

One in two Houstonians say they have a great business idea — and two-thirds have gotten the ball rolling on making their idea a reality. Getty Images

If you're sitting on a game-changing business idea, you're not alone. According to data from Northwestern Mutual, over half of Houstonians surveyed said they they've got something up their sleeves for a startup — and a third of that group said their idea has the capability to change the industry.

Of the respondents who said they had a business idea, almost 60 percent have already taken first steps to making their idea a reality. But for those yet to take a plunge, the factors holding these aspiring entrepreneurs back were primarily financial. More than 60 percent said not having enough finances were what's stopped them from taking the next step, while over a third indicated that they weren't sure what their next step would be. About 30 percent identified the fear of failure as what's held them back.

Similarly, when asked what the biggest hurdle in starting a company for their business idea, almost half of those surveyed said financial support, followed by "making money" with 17 percent. Of course, that's what Carrie Neumann, director of Multicultural Market Strategy at Northwestern Mutual, expected. Enter: Northwestern Mutual's financial advising services.

"A personalized, holistic plan sets business owners on track to achieve their goals, and it also puts protections — for the business, the owner and current or future employees — in place for the expected and unexpected," says Neumann in a release.

"For entrepreneurs, a trusted financial adviser is not only a great resource for the many questions that come up when starting a business, but an adviser can also help plan for the longterm."

Northwestern Mutual conducted a survey in partnership with OnePoll with a sample of 8,000 individuals in the United States. Houston was one of the 12 major metros included in the survey — and the lone Texas city. The other cities included in the survey were Chicago; Cincinnati; Denver; Miami; New York; Los Angeles; Omaha, Nebraska; Raleigh, North Carolina; Richmond, Virginia; San Francisco, and Washington D.C.

Houston skewed a tad more ambitious than the other metros surveyed. Across the sample, 41 percent of survey respondents said they have an idea for a business compared to Houston's 51.4 percent. Miami, New York City, and Los Angeles all had a higher percentage of respondents that said they had a great business idea. Los Angeles had over 60 percent of its surveyed participants respond affirmatively to that question.

The city of Houston has its advantages for entrepreneurs. A recent study shows that salaries stretch further in Houston, with the Bayou City ranking as No. 7 nationally. The study conducted by BusinessStudent.com factored in average pay of common jobs and the cost of living.

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Building Houston

 
 

Vanessa Wyche, director of the Johnson Space Center, gave the keynote address at this year's State of Space event. Screenshot via houston.org

Is the Space City poised to continue its reign as an innovative hub for space exploration? All signs point to yes, according to a group of experts.

The Greater Houston Partnership hosted its annual State of Space this week. The virtual event featured a keynote address from Vanessa Wyche, director of NASA Johnson Space Center, and a panel moderated by David Alexander, chair of aerospace and aviation committee at the GHP and the director of the Rice Space Institute.

The conversations focused on the space innovation activity happening in Houston, as well as an update on the industry as a whole has space commercialization continues to develop. All the speakers addressed how Houston has what it takes to remain a hub for the sector.

"The future looks very bright for Houston that we will remain a leader in Houston spaceflight," Wyche says in her address.

Here are a few other memorable moments from the event.

"Houston, I feel, is poised to be a leader. We have led in human space flight, and we will a leader in commercialization."

— Wyche says in her keynote address, which gave a thorough overview of what all NASA is working on at JSC. She calls out specifically how startups are a driving force in commercialization. JSC is working with local accelerator programs at The Ion and MassChallenge.

"These startups help us to connect to tomorrow's space innovation leaders, and gives our team the opportunity to mentor these entrepreneurs as we work to advance both our scientific and technical knowledge," she says.

"The ability to have a place where government, academia, and industry can come together and share ideas and innovation is incredibly powerful."

​— Steve Altemus, president and CEO of Intuitive Machines LLC, specifically talking about the Houston Spaceport, where Intuitive Machines has signed on as a tenant. Altemus adds that a major key to leading space commercialization is a trained workforce, which the spaceport is focused on cultivating.

"We shouldn't discount the character that Houston has from the standpoint as a great place to build a business."

— Tim Kopra, vice president of robotics and space at MDA Ltd., says, adding that Houston is a big city that feels like a small town. "We need to incentivize companies to come and stay," he says.

"Great cities — like great companies — understand that if you're still, you're probably moving backwards. ... I think Houston gets it in that regard."

— Todd May, senior vice president of science and space at KBR, says, adding that Houston realizes it needs to be on the offensive side to bring innovation to the game, positioning the city very well for the future.

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