boozy innovation

How this Houston-based alcohol importer, distributor uses tech to stay ahead of the curve

This Houston company created its own in-house tech infrastructure — led by Chris Quintanilla — to stay competitive within the alcohol distribution industry. Photo courtesy of Mexcor International

You might say that Mexcor International, a Houston-based importer and distributor of wine, spirits, and other types of alcohol, relies on a single bottle of vodka rather than a case of vodka when it comes to its tech capabilities.

The annual tech budget for the 300-employee company, founded in 1989, falls well below $500,000. Mexcor International's annual revenue hovers around $300 million.

"We do have a decent size tech budget, but it's tiny in comparison to large distributors with multimillion-dollar tech budgets," says Chris Quintanilla, chief sales officer at Mexcor International.

The company leans on an IT director, an IT specialist, and an IT support company to handle tech needs. In other words, Mexcor International's in-house tech resources are minimal.

So, when the company's sales and administration sales team needed to step up its tech game, Quintanilla created a cloud-based software system combining customer relationship management (CRM) and enterprise resource planning (ERP) functions to churn out real-time reporting on inventory, deliveries, and other business matters. He took on the project equipped with IT knowledge he picked up online and at a three-day training session in Colorado, coupled with some simple tech tinkering.

On his own, Quintanilla has developed 46 dashboards that supply details about things such as wine and beer inventory, contacts for account managers, product catalogs, and key performance indicators (KPIs) for the sales team. About 230 employees, or roughly three-fourths of the company's workforce, can access these dashboards. Information on these dashboards can help employees answer myriad questions, such as "Which delivery trucks are arriving today?" or "What percentage of orders are being picked up tonight?"

Quintanilla says one of the key benefits of the dashboards is the ability to see how soon the company will run out of various products at its Texas, California, Florida, and Louisiana warehouses. This functionality enables the company to swiftly head off shortages. It has come in especially handy amid ongoing supply chain snags triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic, he says.

The dashboards also let Mexcor International track which customers' sales have risen or fallen compared with the same time a month or a year ago. With this information at their fingertips, salespeople can chat with customers about whether, for instance, they might like to substitute a brand of poorly selling tequila for another brand of tequila, according to Quintanilla.

In short, the innovation spearheaded by Quintanilla has helped propel Mexcor International well beyond the old days of pen and paper, photocopies, and faxes.

So, why are companies like Quintanilla's turning to in-house capabilities to push past the pen-and-paper approach?

"Companies that develop their own technology have more control over their strategic direction and can better respond to the needs of the market. This can mean a significant competitive advantage when a company develops a compulsory technology before the competition," technology and innovation strategist Evans Baiya wrote for AllBusiness.com.

In a 2020 survey by Boston Consulting Group, 46 percent of corporate executives around the world planned to invest more in their in-house tech capabilities.

"Every enterprise must re-evaluate the capabilities that it can develop in-house with the talent it has and determine which ones to procure from service providers," the consulting giant says. "By building capabilities in-house, companies can reduce the risk of their transformation projects stalling and turn to service providers in areas where they suffer from talent gaps."

At Mexcor International, Quintanilla has stepped in to fill much of the company's gap in tech talent.

Mexcor International established the new cloud-based CRM and ERP system in 2019. It replaced a clunky network-based setup hampered by unwieldy financial, sales, delivery, and routing modules.

"It was just so slow. You could not get the information you needed, and the network was always down," says Quintanilla, adding that the company's network-based system had sustained ransomware and malware attacks.

With the cloud-based system now in place, Mexcor International employees can perform an array of tasks via laptop, desktop, tablet, or smartphone, he says.

Quintanilla says in-house creation of this system aligns with Mexcor International's culture of "wearing multiple hats" to move the business forward, demanding in-house innovation on the tech front.

"If you want to see something happen, you have to grab the bull by the horns and do it yourself," he says. "We are a medium-sized company. We just hired a true IT person in the last two or three years. We don't have million-dollar budgets for big IT departments. We kind of figure it out as we go."

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Building Houston

 
 

Dream Harvest picked up funding to open a 100,000-square-foot indoor farming facility in Houston. Photo courtesy of Dream Harvest

Houston-based Dream Harvest Farming Co., which specializes in sustainably growing produce, has landed a $50 million investment from Orion Energy Partners to open a 100,000-square-foot indoor farming facility in Houston. The facility will enable the company to dramatically ramp up its operations.

The new facility, which will be built in Southwest Houston, is scheduled for completion in January 2023. Dream Harvest’s existing 7,500-square-foot facility in Southwest Houston supplies 45 Whole Foods stores in Texas, Oklahoma, Louisiana, and Arkansas, as well as Sweetgreen restaurants in Texas.

The company currently employs 25 people. With the addition of the 100,000-square-foot facility, Dream Harvest’s headcount will rise to 65.

Dream Harvest relies on wind-powered, year-round indoor vertical farming to generate 400 times the yield of an outdoor farm while using 95 percent less water and no pesticides.

“Because the vast majority of America’s produce is grown in California and has to be shipped over long distances, most of the country receives produce that is old, has a poor flavor profile, and a short shelf life — a major contributing factor to the more than 30 percent of fresh vegetables being discarded in the U.S. each year,” Dream Harvest says in a December 7 news release.

Zain Shauk, co-founder and CEO of Dream Harvest, says his company’s method for growing lettuce, baby greens, kale, mustards, herbs, collards, and cabbage helps cut down on food waste.

“Demand for our produce has far outpaced supply, an encouraging validation of our approach as well as positive news for our planet, which is facing the rising problem of food and resource waste,” Shauk says. “While we have the yields today to support our business, we are pleased to partner with Orion on this financing, which will enable us to greatly expand our production and increase access to our produce for many more consumers.”

Dream Harvest expects to expand distribution to more than 250 retail locations in 2022.

“Orion’s focus on sustainable infrastructure and deep experience in building large industrial facilities will be complementary to Dream Harvest’s impressive track record of being a reliable supplier to high-caliber customers by achieving consistent yields, food safety, and operational efficiencies … ,” says Nazar Massouh, co-managing partner and CEO of Orion Energy Partners, which has offices in Houston and New York City.

Other companies in the Orion Energy Partners portfolio include Houston-based Caliche Development Partners, Tomball-based Python Holdings, The Woodlands-based Evolution Well Services, Houston-based Produced Water Transfer, and Houston-based Tiger Rentals.

Zain Shauk is the co-founder and CEO of Dream Harvest. Photo courtesy of Dream Harvest

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