donor news

Houston Methodist boosts new Woodlands program thanks to $10M anonymous gift

Houston Methodist in The Woodlands has a $10 million infusion. Rendering courtesy of Houston Methodist

Houston Methodist has been in the spotlight of late, notably, the healthcare system was ranked No. 1 in Texas for a third year in a row — and one of the top in the nation — in May.

Now, the system has just received an large donation that will help bring the award-winning prescription for success north. Houston Methodist has been gifted a $10 million philanthropic commitment specifically for its medical expansion into The Woodlands, the hospital announced.

Thanks to the gift from an anonymous donor, this is the first time a Texas Medical Center institution will offer a sponsored academic medical program specifically at one of its community hospitals, Methodist notes in press materials. This program will include fellowships in cardiovascular disease, orthopedic surgery, pulmonary critical care, and sports medicine, and more.

This philanthropic offering marks the largest gift Houston Methodist The Woodlands Hospital, or any of the regional hospital within the Houston Methodist system, has ever received.

“Building a well-rounded graduate medical education program has always been a priority for Houston Methodist,” said Timothy Boone, M.D., Ph.D., Director of the Education for the Houston Methodist Academic Institute, in a statement. “By creating an academic medical campus housed at a regional hospital where patients can seek specialty care typically only offered in the Texas Medical Center, we’re extending the academic culture and patient offerings in The Woodlands beyond standard clinical care. We’ll also have the opportunity to advance scholarly activity with our faculty and staff who will be part of training these residents and fellows and to bring highly specialized offerings to a booming area of the city.”

Specifically, Houston Methodist’s academic medical program includes more than 350 residents and fellows. Those who are a part of the new academic program, slated to launch in 2024, at Houston Methodist The Woodlands, will match and serve their full time residency training in internal medicine, and potentially their fellowship training, in The Woodlands and the Medical Center.

“The generosity and encouragement from this anonymous donor is a testament to the exceptional work our physicians and staff in The Woodlands provide day in and day out,” said Debra Sukin, regional senior vice president and CEO of Houston Methodist The Woodlands. “This commitment will help open multiple doors — to attract some of the best new physicians, to retain well-trained specialists who want to further their medical expertise through fellowships and hopefully want to grow their practice in a vibrant community that’s also a wonderful area to live. We’re humbled to have this support and excited about the opportunity to grow our academic medical education offerings on the north side of Houston.”

------

This article originally ran on CultureMap.

Trending News

Building Houston

 
 

Houston experts at the annual Pumps and Pipes event discussed the importance of open innovation. Photo courtesy of Houston Methodist

Open innovation, or the practice of sourcing new technologies and idea across institutions and industries, was top of mind at the annual Pumps & Pipes event earlier this week.

The event, which is put on by an organization of the same name every year, focuses on the intersection of the energy, health care, and aerospace industries. The keynote discussion, with panelists representing each industry, covered several topics, including the importance of open innovation.

If you missed the discussion, check out some key moments from the panel.

“If we want to survive as a city, we need to make sure we can work together.”

Juliana Garaizar of Greentown Labs. "From being competitive, we’ve become collaborative, because the challenges at hand in the world right now is too big to compete," she continues.

“The pace of innovation has changed.”

Steve Rader of NASA. He explains that 90 percent of all scientists who have ever lived are alive on earth today. “If you think you can do it all yourself — and just find all the latest technology yourself, you’re kidding yourself.”

“You can’t close the door. If you do, you’re closing the door to potential opportunities.”

— Michelle Stansbury, Houston Methodist. “If you think you can do it all yourself — and just find all the latest technology yourself, you’re kidding yourself.” She explains that there's an influx of technologies coming in, but what doesn't work now, might work later or for another collaborator. "I would say that health care as a whole hasn’t been very good at sharing all of the things we’ve been creating, but that’s not the case today," she explains.

“The thing that makes Houston great is the same thing that makes open innovation great: diversity.”

— Rader says, adding that this makes for a great opportunity for Houston.

“Some of our greatest innovations that we’ve had come from other industries — not from health tech companies.”

— Stansbury says. "I think that's the piece everyone needs to understand," she says. "Don't just look in your own industry to solve problems."

“Nobody knows what is the best technology — the one that is going to be the new oil."

— Garaizar says. “All of this is going to be a lot of trial and error," she continues. “We don’t have the luxury of time anymore.”

Trending News