Money moves

Houston-based oil and gas software company raises $1.6 million

Houston-based M1neral has raised $1.6 million in an oversubscribed pre-seed round. Getty Images

A Houston energy tech startup that's digitally optimizing the minerals rights buying and selling process has closed an oversubscribed pre-seed financing round to the tune of $1.6 million.

M1neral's round was co-led by Amnis Ventures and Pheasant Energy, among a few other select investors and strategic partners. The company was co-founded by Jacob Avery, Kyle Chapman, and Shawn Cutter.

"Amnis Ventures is delighted to co-lead the current round of funding in M1neral. The founders come with deep knowledge of oil and gas, coupled with proven, delivered technology implementations in the energy space," says Manuel Silva III, president of Amnis Ventures Inc., in a press release. "The M1neral platform will bring age-old upstream oil and gas processes into the technology revolution of the 21st century that we have come to expect in other sectors."

M1neral's founders believe the mineral rights transaction process — akin to the real estate market in terms of the logistics — is ripe for a tech transformation, as it's been "stuck in the dark ages," according to the release.

"The mineral and royalty market is extensive in value but highly fractionated – over $500 billion in value spread across more than 12 million owners around the country," says Chapman, who serves as CEO, in the news release. "Add to that a lack of quality information and processes that are mostly manual, and it's easy to see what makes these transactions a painful and lengthy process."

M1neral's cloud-based platform acts as a one-stop shop for buyers. They can easily research opportunities and engage with sellers and service providers. The platform optimizes artificial intelligence and workflow automation to close deals quicker than traditional methods, Chapman says in the release.

"M1neral has identified, analyzed, and addressed significant issues on the technology side of the mineral and royalty market. Pheasant Energy has always taken a technology-driven approach and a partnership with M1neral was an obvious next step," says Ryan C. Moore, CEO of Pheasant Energy, in the news release. "The executive team at M1neral is well-versed in the industry and the challenges that both professionals and individual owners face on a daily basis. As the platform develops, everyone will understand the difference in vision with the M1neral team and the efficiencies that will be achieved with their product."

Alex Robart, CEO of Ambyint, joins the Houston Innovators Podcast to discuss his plans to grow his company. Photo courtesy of Ambyint

After years of having to educate potential customers about the game-changing technology that artificial intelligence can be, Alex Robart, CEO of Ambyint, says it's a different story nowadays.

"We're seeing our customers spend a little more time understanding AI," Robart says on this week's episode of the Houston Innovators Podcast. "More and more boards of mid-sized [exploration and production companies] are challenging their executive teams to do something with AI."

Ambyint, a Calgary-based energy tech startup with its sales and executive teams based in Houston, uses AI to optimize well operations — Robart describes it as a Nest thermostat but for oil rigs. On average, 80 percent of wells aren't optimized — they are either running too fast and not getting enough out of the ground or running too slow and wasting energy, Robart says.

Recently, Ambyint closed its series B investment round at $15 million led by Houston-based Cottonwood Venture Partners led the round with contribution from Houston-based Mercury Fund. Robart says these funds will go to growing their technology to work on a greater variety of wells as well as hire people in both the Canada and Houston offices.

Robart runs Ambyint with his twin brother Chris, who serves as president of the company. The pair have long careers as serial entrepreneurs and even run an energy tech investment company, called Unconventional Capital. Between the two shared companies, the brothers have their own niches.

"We've been really thoughtful about ensuring that we take on different portfolios — we don't really own things jointly. That's been really helpful for us to carve out our own spheres that we own," Robart says."Chris has really become our lead customer-facing person on all things new products."