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Houston-based oil and gas software company raises $1.6 million

Houston-based M1neral has raised $1.6 million in an oversubscribed pre-seed round. Getty Images

A Houston energy tech startup that's digitally optimizing the minerals rights buying and selling process has closed an oversubscribed pre-seed financing round to the tune of $1.6 million.

M1neral's round was co-led by Amnis Ventures and Pheasant Energy, among a few other select investors and strategic partners. The company was co-founded by Jacob Avery, Kyle Chapman, and Shawn Cutter.

"Amnis Ventures is delighted to co-lead the current round of funding in M1neral. The founders come with deep knowledge of oil and gas, coupled with proven, delivered technology implementations in the energy space," says Manuel Silva III, president of Amnis Ventures Inc., in a press release. "The M1neral platform will bring age-old upstream oil and gas processes into the technology revolution of the 21st century that we have come to expect in other sectors."

M1neral's founders believe the mineral rights transaction process — akin to the real estate market in terms of the logistics — is ripe for a tech transformation, as it's been "stuck in the dark ages," according to the release.

"The mineral and royalty market is extensive in value but highly fractionated – over $500 billion in value spread across more than 12 million owners around the country," says Chapman, who serves as CEO, in the news release. "Add to that a lack of quality information and processes that are mostly manual, and it's easy to see what makes these transactions a painful and lengthy process."

M1neral's cloud-based platform acts as a one-stop shop for buyers. They can easily research opportunities and engage with sellers and service providers. The platform optimizes artificial intelligence and workflow automation to close deals quicker than traditional methods, Chapman says in the release.

"M1neral has identified, analyzed, and addressed significant issues on the technology side of the mineral and royalty market. Pheasant Energy has always taken a technology-driven approach and a partnership with M1neral was an obvious next step," says Ryan C. Moore, CEO of Pheasant Energy, in the news release. "The executive team at M1neral is well-versed in the industry and the challenges that both professionals and individual owners face on a daily basis. As the platform develops, everyone will understand the difference in vision with the M1neral team and the efficiencies that will be achieved with their product."

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Karl Ecklund, left, and Paul Padley of Rice University have received a $1.3 million grant from the Department of Energy to continue physics research on the universe. Photo by Jeff Fitlow/Rice University

Two Rice University physicists and professors have received a federal grant to continue research on dark matter in the universe.

Paul Padley and Karl Ecklund, professors of physics and astronomy at Rice, have received a $1.3 million grant from the Department of Energy for their research to continue the university's ongoing research at the Large Hadron Collider, or LHC, a particle accelerator consisting of a 17-mile ring of superconducting magnets buried beneath Switzerland and France.

"With this grant we will be able to continue our investigations into the nature of the matter that comprises the universe, what the dark matter that permeates the universe is, and if there is physics beyond what we already know," Padley says in a press release.

This grant is a part of the DOE's $132 million in funding for high-energy physics research. The LHC has received a total of $4.5 million to date to continue this research. Most recently, Ecklund and Padley received a $3 million National Science Foundation grant to go toward updates to the LHC.

"High-energy physics research improves our understanding of the universe and is an essential element for maintaining America's leadership in science," says Paul Dabbar, undersecretary for science at the DOE, in the release. "These projects at 53 different institutions across our nation will advance efforts both in theory and through experiments that explore the subatomic world and study the cosmos. They will also support American scientists serving key roles in important international collaborations at institutions across our nation."

In 2012, Padley and his team discovered the Higgs boson, a feat that was extremely key to the continuance of exploring the Standard Model of particle physics. Since then, the physicists have been working hard to answer the many questions involved in studying physics and the universe.

"Over many decades, the particle physics group at Rice has been making fundamental contributions to our understanding of the basic building blocks of the universe," Padley says in the release. "With this grant we will be able to continue this long tradition of important work."

Paul Padley and his team as made important dark matter findings at the Large Hadron Collider in Europe. Photo via rice.ed

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