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Houston-area energy tech startup acquired by engineering consulting company

LaserStream has been acquired by Stress Engineering Services Inc. Getty Images

A Humble-based startup that provides laser-based scans of pipeline has been acquired by Houston-based Stress Engineering Services Inc.

LaserStream's technology that can evaluate damage and corrosion as well as calculate measurements of various equipment has been folded into SES. Three of the startup's leaders will join SES to run the group, and the financial amount of the deal has not been disclosed.

"We are proud of the prior working relationship enjoyed between our two companies and we are confident that LaserStream will forge a successful future as part of SES," co-founder Jason Waligura, who will move over to SES, says in a news release. "We look forward to delivering strong results for our existing clients, as well as expanding our capabilities with the world class service and capability of SES."

SES has acquired LaserSteam's laser-mapping technology and will combine with its laboratories and service offerings in Houston; Waller, Texas; New Orleans; Cincinnati; Singapore; and Calgary, Alberta, per the release. The technology is impactful on several industry verticals, including upstream, midstream, and downstream oil and gas, as well as the aerospace, consumer, and medical services industries.

"We believe that growing our existing capabilities is critical to our success in the broad spectrum of markets in which we participate," says Kenneth Bhalla, chief technical officer at SES, in the release. "The acquisition of Laserstream will add new, innovative capabilities in our core markets. This will diversify our product portfolio and capabilities in new and important areas. We are very excited to add LaserStream to an already outstanding business and team."

LaserStream was named one of the 10 most-promising startups at Rice University's fifth annual Rice Alliance Startup Roundup event at the 2019 Offshore Technology Conference. The company was rounded in 2014.


Photo via laserstreamlp.com

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Building Houston

 
 

"There's something magical happening in Houston, and [VCs] want a piece of it." Photo via Getty Images

Houston's seen a growth in startup and venture investment — even amid the pandemic — and a group of Houston innovators sat down for a virtual event to discuss what's lead to this evolution.

The Greater Houston Partnership hosted an installment of its Houston Industry Series focused on Digital Tech on Thursday, September 24. The panel of experts, moderated by Krisha Tracy of Google Cloud, discussed how they've observed the paradigm shift that's occurred in Houston over the past few years — and why.

Missed the discussion? Here are some significant overheard moments from the virtual event.

“I think there really is an interest for venture capital here, both locally and also welcoming it from outside of Houston. … There’s something magical happening in Houston, and [VCs] want a piece of it. I think that magical piece is a renewed interest in collaborating.”

Stephanie Campbell, managing director of Houston Angel Network and co-founder of The Artemis Fund. "I think a lot [of this progress] is due to the GHP, Houston Exponential, and the founding of the HX Venture Fund to bring those venture funds to Houston to say, 'what's happening here?'" Campbell adds, saying that this connectivity and collaboration that's happening in Houston VC is unique.

“I think there’s a misconception around all we do is oil and gas and life science in Houston, but when you think about what VC-backable companies look like, they’re tech, they’re B2B SaaS, they’re highly scalable, and they don’t tend to be capital-intensive types of things we see corporate venture backing.”

Campbell says, adding "the connectivity and the interest in VC is really taking off. It's an exciting time to be in Houston and Texas in general."

“Plug and Play’s ventures team is based in Silicon Valley and one thing they enjoy about meeting Houston-based founders is valuations tend to be more reasonable than in the Bay Area."

Payal Patel, director of Plug and Play Tech Center in Houston. "There are gems to be found," she adds.

“I don’t know what it is — if it’s something in the water or just Texans being very friendly, but the investors here share deal flow. It takes a village, and I think we all understand a rising tide lifts all boats."

Patel says on the collaborative nature of Houston. "It's really magical."

“What you’re witnessing is a city that has been waiting for industrial innovation to reach the point where it can be adopted at a really high scale, and that happened around 2017.”

Jon Nordby, managing director at MassChallenge Texas in Houston. Nordby adds that MassChallenge in Houston hasn't been keen on consumer tech, or the "grilled cheese delivery apps," as he describes. "We like companies that are in love with problems, not so much in love with solutions. … We build really meaningful tech."

“Over the last year or two, we’ve seen that sleeping giant get awoken. Open and external innovation is newly adopted by more legacy industries where it wasn’t before — and that’s just created a mountain of opportunities for startups and investors alike.”

Nordby says on the shift toward this meaningful, problem-solving technology, which Houston is full of, as he observes.

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