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COVID-19 has affected how office space will be designed, says Houston expert

Here's how this work-from-home experiment has affected the office space — from a design perspective. Photo courtesy of Joe Aker

The last nine weeks have thrust businesses large and small into an experiment unlike anything we might have ever imagined. The impact has the potential to separate businesses that will stagnate versus those that will accelerate and thrive.

Our workplaces may become smaller as we realize we don't all need to be there at the same time, but they certainly won't go away. They will, instead, be more human-centered, more technologically robust, and more resilient for the next time. So, a warning too: If the office is unsafe, scary, or demeaning — if it doesn't put people first — employees will vote with their feet.

Office workers have been empowered with the sudden ability to choose where, when, and how to work. And, certainly there have been starts and stops and plenty of stories of less-than-ideal execution, but by and large, the experiment has opened our eyes: Work has not stopped, our people are trustworthy, and, in fact, we found out they have kids, dogs, pictures on the wall, bedrooms, and kitchens just like us.

So, perhaps counterintuitively, the office is more important than ever. As a place to provide a technology offering we don't enjoy at our kitchen table, as a place to better support small group work beyond the tiny real estate of our laptop screens, and as a place that physically represents what our organizations are truly all about. The role of the workplace has never been more critical to business success.

Here's how this work-from-home experiment has affected the office space — from a design perspective.

Planning and systems

The first impact on workplace design will be the approach to simple planning. Flexible, modular planning logic and building systems will have a distinct advantage for organizations as their physical needs evolve.

Institutionalizing 6-foot distancing requirements will create workplaces that are more resilient and ready for the next one — who among us now believes this is a one-time event? Individual workspaces and generous circulation paths are not just safer but help contribute to a sense that is truly a great place to work.

Nimble spaces that can change overnight from large to small or open to closed will be supported by flexible building systems, planning that prioritizes daylight and the outdoors for all, and mechanical systems that deliver clean, fresh air. Look to landlords and building owners in the race to advance the use of sophisticated filtering, fresh air, raised access floor and daylighting.

Solo seats

Workspaces will continue to be a combination of open and closed offices, but caution to those who believe this marks the end of the open office. Dimensions and planning arrangements will simply build in proper physical distancing. As cleaning protocols and standards become institutionalized, shared seating will accelerate the desire to reduce overall area requirements but create highly functional solo seats.

This acceleration to sharing will be characterized by high quality materials, lighting and ergonomics with a decided "BYO" ethos. Bring not only your laptop, but your keyboard, mouse, and pack of critical office supplies. Your personal cooler with your day's food and drink simply plugs in at your seat and leaves when you do.

And, you won't forget to wipe it down when you arrive and again on your departure.

Collaborative seats

Meetings and how they occur may go through the most significant physical change. One of the primary functions of the new workplace is to provide space that can support small group settings that simply cannot exist from the kitchen table. Meetings of two-to-six with proper social distancing, rich technological tools, and seamless accommodation for artificial intelligence, virtual reality and virtual participants will mean chairs and individual tables that are all easily movable. Look for less of a need for physical enclosure and more flexible settings. Big, old school meetings, training, and the meetings designed around a giant beautiful conference room will go virtual.

Your friend the landlord 

The first landlord that tags their building as "Certified Clean" will have the decided advantage and a new definition of Class A. Look for landlords to promote features and amenities that augment the tenant experience: Coworking spaces — visibly and constantly cleaned, food and drink offerings — manned, cleaned, and sanitized of course, and technologically-robust meeting settings will provide hubs for effective work as either additions to tenant spaces themselves or as free-standing neighborhood hubs. And look for these hubs to move out of CBDs to help transform Work from Home to truly Work from Anywhere. Think of an in-between spot between the binary choices of downtown or the kitchen table.

The requirement that the workplace must be a compelling human-centric place has never been more critical to business success. An organization's most valuable resource are the people who create the company's culture, live the purpose and drive its values. Those people are now empowered to work anywhere — the workplace is more important than ever to draw the most talented teams and drive business performance.

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Larry Lander is a principal at Houston-based architecture and planning firm PDR.

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Building Houston

 
 

Seven startups walked away with cash prizes from this year's MassChallenge accelerator program in Houston. Photo via Getty Images

MassChallenge named its winners of its 2020 accelerator at a virtual event on October 22. The program awarded a total of $200,000 in equity-free prizes across seven startups from its second Houston cohort.

This year's program took place completely virtually due to the pandemic. Already, the 56 startups involved in the cohort have raised $44.4 million funding, generated $24 million in revenue, and created 297 jobs, says Jon Nordby, managing director of MassChallenge Texas in Houston, in a news release.

"This has been a year full of change, to say the least," he says. "But startups thrive in uncertain times — because they can move fast and remain agile, they are able quickly meet each new need that arises. I'm extremely proud of the startups in our 2020 cohort — during the course of the program, they've pivoted, adjusted, and evolved in order to grow their businesses."

The startups that won across the Houston cohort included Houston-based PATH EX Inc., which won the $100,000 Diamond Award, is focused on the rapid diagnosis and treatment of sepsis through an unique pathogen extraction platform.

Four companies won $25,000 Gold Awards:

  • Healium, based in Columbia, Missouri, is an extended reality device created for self-management of anxiety.
  • Ozark Integrated Circuits Inc., based in Fayetteville, Arkansas, specializes in problem solving using technology and software in the harshest environments – from jet engines to earth orbit.
  • PREEMIEr Diagnostics, based in Southfield, Michigan, created a way to identify which premature infants need an adjustment to their glucose levels to prevent them from losing vision.
  • Scout Inc., based in Alexandria, Virginia, is developing the first commercial in-space satellite inspection service.

Two companies won the Sidecar Awards, securing each a $25,000 Innospark Artificial Intelligence Prize.

  • Articulate Labs, based in Dallas, makes mobile, adaptive devices to help knee osteoarthritis and knee replacement patients rehabilitate on the go during everyday activity.
  • Houston-based Starling Medical has tapped into tech to optimize urinary catheter for patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction.
The Houston Angel Network awarded Ozark Integrated Circuits their prize of $50,000.
"The progress these entrepreneurs made in just a few months has all of the hope, drama, anticipation, and optimism of seeing dawn break after a particularly difficult night," says Wogbe Ofori, Principal at 360Approach and a MassChallenge mentor, in the release. "It's fulfilling, actually, and makes me proud to be a MassChallenge mentor."
The seven startups were awarded alongside 27 other startups from this year's Austin, Boston, and Rhode Island accelerators at the virtual event. The event was hosted by Chris Denson of Innovation Crush, and featured a fireside chat between Arianna Huffington, founder and CEO of Thrive Global, and Linda Pizzuti Henry, managing director at the Boston Globe.
Earlier this fall, MassChallenge named its 10 startup finalists, whittled down from 56 from 13 countries and 13 states to its first-ever virtual accelerator, which began in June.

"In the face of great uncertainty, MassChallenge Texas in Houston charged forward and did exactly what they ask their startups to do: love the problem," says Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner in the release. "The successful pivot to virtual is a testament to the strength of their global community and the motivation of the Houston ecosystem to get behind new ideas and create businesses that will set roots and grow here.

"As one of the most innovative cities, Houston is a place where startups can thrive – even in the midst of a pandemic. Programs like MassChallenge provide the best practices and networks to ensure startups get the access they need to create sustainable businesses and lasting change."

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