HOUSTON INNOVATORS PODCAST EPISODE 38

Local innovation leader to focus on diversity while standing up new-to-Houston cleantech incubator

Juliana Garaizar is working to help set up Houston's Greentown Labs incubator with diversity and inclusion in mind. Courtesy photo

As Greentown Labs, a cleantech startup incubator based outside of Boston, enters into the Houston market, it's doing so with diversity and inclusion in mind, says Juliana Garaizar, launch director at Greentown Houston.

Garaizar has been involved in the Houston innovation ecosystem for years from her stints at the Houston Angel Network followed by the Texas Medical Center's venture fund. She's also been involved with Portfolia — a female-focused venture network — and is president at the Business Angel Minority Association, or baMa. She's spent much of her time lately advocating and promoting diversity in investing — something that falls in line with Greentown's priorities as they enter into the most diverse city in the country.

"The latest founding partners that we've had at Greentown Labs when they were considering becoming a partner, they all asked what we are doing in terms of diversity and inclusion," Garaizar says in this week's episode of the Houston Innovators Podcast. "We are putting together a working group at Greentown for D&I. It's exciting that many of our partners are engaging."

She's referring to the 11 — and counting — corporate founding partners Greentown Houston has announced so far. Greentown's entrance into Houston has been long awaited, and Emily Reichert, CEO of Greentown Labs, hired Garaizar and her colleague, Jason Ethier, the operations lead for Greentown Houston, to be the boots on the ground during this time.

With COVID-19 affecting so much of the organization's roll out strategy, Garaizar says its actually been a blessing in disguise for the organization.

"I think the silver lining of this COVID-19 experience is that we are much more integrated with the Boston team, and we're learning at a much faster rate," she says. "That's why we decided to also open Houston for virtual memberships before we open our building in Q1 of 2021."

While launching during a pandemic isn't the most ideal, the timing for the new Houston location has been. Garaizer says she's seeing more and more energy companies prioritizing clean energy innovations and new technologies.

"I believe that Greentown Labs is going to be a catalyst for the energy transition here in Houston," she says. "There are several things that are changing in Houston, and I think we're coming in at the right time."

Listen to the full interview with Garaizer below — or wherever you get your podcasts — and subscribe for weekly episodes.


Trending News

Building Houston

 
 

A new report finds Houston a top city for business friendliness and connectivity. Photo via Getty Images

Houston, the future looks bright.

A new study from the fDi Intelligence division of the Financial Times places Houston at No. 7 among the top major cities of the future for 2021-22 across North, South, and Central America. Among major cities in the Americas, Houston appears at No. 3 for business friendliness and No. 4 for connectivity.

"Houston is known as one of the youngest, fastest-growing, and most diverse cities anywhere in the world. I am thrilled that we continue to be recognized for our thriving innovation ecosystem," Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner is quoted as saying in the fDi study.

Toronto leads the 2021-22 list of the top major cities in the Americas, followed by San Francisco, Montreal, Chicago, and Boston.

The rankings are based on data in five categories:

  • Economic potential
  • Business friendliness
  • Human capital and lifestyle
  • Cost effectiveness
  • Connectivity

Houston's no stranger to the list. Last year, the city ranked No. 3 on the same study, and in 2019, claimed the No. 5 spot.

"The fact that Houston consistently ranks among the top markets for foreign direct investment speaks to our region's connectivity and business-friendly environment," says Susan Davenport, chief economic development officer at the Greater Houston Partnership. "Many of the industry sectors we target for expansion and relocation in Houston are global in nature — from energy 2.0 and life sciences to aerospace and digital tech. The infrastructure and diverse workforce that make these prime growth sectors for us among domestic players are equally attractive to international companies looking to establish or strengthen ties in the Americas."

International trade is a cornerstone of the Houston area's economy. In 2020, the region recorded $129.5 billion in exports, according to the Greater Houston Partnership. China ranked as the region's top trading partner last year, followed by Mexico, Brazil, Korea, Germany, the Netherlands, India, Japan, the United Kingdom, and Italy.

Houston's role as a hub for foreign trade and international business "is likely to support the region's economic recovery in the months and years ahead," the partnership noted in May.

"We talk often of Houston as a great global city — one that competes with the likes of London, Tokyo, São Paulo, and Beijing. But that's only possible because of our infrastructure — namely our port — and our connections around the world," Bob Harvey, president and CEO of the partnership, said last month. "Houston's ties abroad remain strong."

Trending News