Houston Innovators Podcast Episode 66

Local fund of funds to put a national spotlight on venture capital in Houston

Guillermo Borda and Sandy Guitar, managing directors at the HX Venture Fund, join the Houston Innovators Podcast to discuss Venture Houston. Photos courtesy

The role of the HX Venture Fund is to pull out-of-Houston venture capital funds into the Houston innovation ecosystem — and the fund of funds is hoping to exactly that with an inaugural event next month.

Venture Houston, which is taking place online on February 4th and 5th, will bring together entrepreneurs, corporations, venture capital investors, and startup development organizations for a summit full of thought leadership — as well as a startup pitch competition with over $1.7 million on the line. (InnovationMap is the media partner for the event.)

HXVF Managing Directors Guillermo Borda and Sandy Guitar joined the Houston Innovators Podcast this week to discuss what they are most excited from the events.

"In this conference, we have representation from all stakeholders," Borda says, recognizing that HXVF has connected VCs with more than $4 billion of ready-to-deploy capital to Houston startups. "This conference is a way of engaging that further — we call that activation."

With the rollercoaster that 2020 was, Borda and Guitar recognize how timely a conference like this is. Guitar says on the show that with all the challenges that came with remote working, investors are all the more prepared for the future. Besides, she adds, a crisis is a perfect time for technology to rise to the top.

"COVID is real and the disruption is significant, but in the eyes of a venture capitalist, this is opportunity," Guitar says. "This is a groundbreaking time for VCs. ... The best VCs and the best entrepreneurs are leaning in on these opportunities."

With HXVF's ultimate goal to drive investment into Houston startups, Venture Houston will also feature a startup pitch competition that will have investment opportunities from the likes of Mercury Fund, The Artemis Fund, Montrose Lane, Fitz Gate Ventures, and more. Startups can apply to the contest online until Friday, January 15.

"We are asking as many Houston entrepreneurs who are considering raising capital now or any time in the next year to apply to this pitch competition," Guitar says. "The prizes we have are phenomenal and can really help get a young company started."

Guitar and Borda discuss more about the event and the future of venture capital in Houston on the show. Listen to the full interview below — or wherever you stream your podcasts — and subscribe for weekly episodes.


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Building Houston

 
 

Business and government leaders in the Houston area hope the region can become a hub for CCS activity. Photo via Getty Images

Three big businesses — Air Liquide, BASF, and Shell — have added their firepower to the effort to promote large-scale carbon capture and storage for the Houston area’s industrial ecosystem.

These companies join 11 others that in 2021 threw their support behind the initiative. Participants are evaluating how to use safe carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology at Houston-area facilities that provide energy, power generation, and advanced manufacturing for plastics, motor fuels, and packaging.

Other companies backing the CCS project are Calpine, Chevron, Dow, ExxonMobil, INEOS, Linde, LyondellBasell, Marathon Petroleum, NRG Energy, Phillips 66, and Valero.

Business and government leaders in the Houston area hope the region can become a hub for CCS activity.

“Large-scale carbon capture and storage in the Houston region will be a cornerstone for the world’s energy transition, and these companies’ efforts are crucial toward advancing CCS development to achieve broad scale commercial impact,” Charles McConnell, director of University of Houston’s Center for Carbon Management in Energy, says in a news release.

McConnell and others say CCS could help Houston and the rest of the U.S. net-zero goals while generating new jobs and protecting current jobs.

CCS involves capturing carbon dioxide from industrial activities that would otherwise be released into the atmosphere and then injecting it into deep underground geologic formations for secure and permanent storage. Carbon dioxide from industrial users in the Houston area could be stored in nearby onshore and offshore storage sites.

An analysis of U.S Department of Energy estimates shows the storage capacity along the Gulf Coast is large enough to store about 500 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide, which is equivalent to more than 130 years’ worth of industrial and power generation emissions in the United States, based on 2018 data.

“Carbon capture and storage is not a single technology, but rather a series of technologies and scientific breakthroughs that work in concert to achieve a profound outcome, one that will play a significant role in the future of energy and our planet,” says Gretchen Watkins, U.S. president of Shell. “In that spirit, it’s fitting this consortium combines CCS blueprints and ambitions to crystalize Houston’s reputation as the energy capital of the world while contributing to local and U.S. plans to help achieve net-zero emissions.”

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