Crunching the numbers

Houston workers remain both wary and optimistic of data collection in the workplace, according to a report

According to a new report from Accenture, Houston employees want clarity and control when it comes to data collection and use. Getty Images

Chances are good your employer has a lot of data about you stored away in the company's cloud. The real question is whether or not you trust them with it. According to a new study from Accenture, the jury is still out for Houston employees when it comes to data collection.

Data misuse scandals have stirred the pot quite a bit, and 68 percent of Houston workers surveyed said those events have raised their concern about their employer's use of their data. Similarly, 64 percent of Houstonians are worried their data is vulnerable to a cyber attack. Just over half of the survey respondents are worried about their employer using technology and data to spy on them.

Despite this skepticism, 81 percent of Houston respondents said they would benefit and improve from data-based performance feedback.

"Organizations are sitting on a wealth of data that, if harnessed, can help them unlock the vast potential of their people and business," says Diana McKenzie, chief information officer of California-based Workday Inc., in the report. "A key element is establishing a track record of trust built on ethical, responsible behavior as part of an organization's people strategy. Organizations that have invested in laying this critical foundation have the opportunity to tap into this data, in turn accelerating innovation and creating a workplace that benefits all people."

The general consensus of the study, which surveyed 500 Houston workers and 10,000 workers across the globe, is that employees want control and clarity from their employers when it comes to data collection and use. Of those surveyed in Houston, 66 percent say they are open to data collection if their employer co-created the policies with feedback from their employees. Meanwhile, over 70 percent of employers say they either already do that or plan to co-create technology policies with their workforce.

Here are some key findings from the report.

  • 56 percent of Houston workers are aware that their employer is using workplace apps — like email, instant messaging tools, calendars, etc. — to collect data.
  • 66 percent of survey respondents in Houston are fine with their data being collected as long as they receive personal benefits from the data collection use.
  • 65 percent of Houston workers want to own their own data to take it with them if and when they leave the company. Meanwhile, according to the national report, 58 percent of employers are open to that idea.
  • 65 percent of Houston employees are open to the practice of data collection — as long as C-level executives and the board monitor and are held accountable for responsible use of new technologies and sources of workplace data.
  • 60 percent of Houston workers would consider leaving the company if they learned their superiors didn't responsibly use new technologies and sources of workplace data.

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Building Houston

 
 

Juliana Garaizar is now the chief development and investment officer at Greentown Labs, as well as continuing to be head of the Houston incubator. Image courtesy of Greentown

The new year has brought some big news from Greentown Labs.

The Somerville, Massachusetts-based climatetech incubator with its second location at Greentown Houston named a new member to its C-suite, is seeking new Houston team members, and has officially finished its transition into a nonprofit.

Juliana Garaizar, who originally joined Greentown as launch director ahead of the Houston opening in 2021, has been promoted from vice president of innovation to chief development and investment officer.

"I'm refocusing on the Greentown Labs level in a development role, which means fundraising for both locations and potentially new ones," Garaizar tells InnovationMap. "My role is not only development, but also investment. That's something I'm very glad to be pursuing with my investment hat. Access to capital is key for all our members, and I'm going to be in charge of refining and upgrading our investment program."

While she will also maintain her role as head of the Houston incubator, Greentown Houston is also hiring a general manager position to oversee day-to-day and internal operations of the hub. Garaizar says this role will take some of the internal-facing responsibilities off of her plate.

"Now that we are more than 80 members, we need more internal coordination," she explains. "Considering that the goal for Greentown is to grow to more locations, there's going to be more coordination and, I'd say, more autonomy for the Houston campus."

The promotion follows a recent announcement that Emily Reichert, who served as CEO for the company for a decade, has stepped back to become CEO emeritus. Greentown is searching for its next leader and CFO Kevin Taylor is currently serving as interim CEO. Garaizar says the transition is representative of Greentown's future as it grows to more locations and a larger organization.

"Emily's transition was planned — but, of course, in stealth mode," Garaizar says, adding that Reichert is on the committee that's finding the new CEO. "She thinks scaling is a different animal from putting (Greentown) together, which she did really beautifully."

Garaizar says her new role will include overseeing Greentown's new nonprofit status. She tells InnovationMap that the organization originally was founded as a nonprofit, but converted to a for-profit in order to receive a loan at its first location. Now, with the mission focus Greentown has and the opportunities for grants and funding, it was time to convert back to a nonprofit, Garaizar says.

"When we started fundraising for Houston, everyone was asking why we weren't a nonprofit. That opened the discussion again," she says. "The past year we have been going through that process and we can finally say it has been completed.

"I think it's going to open the door to a lot more collaboration and potential grants," she adds.

Greentown is continuing to grow its team ahead of planned expansion. The organization hasn't yet announced its next location — Garaizar says the primary focus is filling the CEO position first. In Houston, the hub is also looking for an events manager to ensure the incubator is providing key programming for its members, as well as the Houston innovation community as a whole.

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