Houston innovators podcast episode 124

2 Houston experts explain what's next in health care innovation — from tech to workforce development

Houston Methodist's Roberta Schwartz and Texas A&M University's Dr. Roderic Pettigrew shared their thought leadership at a recent panel for Houston Tech Rodeo. Photos courtesy

The medical field is full of problems to solve — how to improve patient care, new diseases to treat, extending but also improving quality of life, and so much more. It's an industry that needs innovation — and in many cases, that means introducing new technologies and ideas.

At last week's Houston Tech Rodeo health tech saloon, two experts weighed in on the discussion. Roberta Schwartz, chief innovation officer of Houston Methodist, and Dr. Roderic Pettigrew, dean of the Intercollegiate School of Engineering Medicine at Texas A&M University, discussed how they view the health care industry's future — and what they are doing to make sure future health care providers and innovators are ready.

“You want the next generation to get equally as excited about what’s happening in that world (of health tech) and realize how much opportunity there is to disrupt the field of health care,” Schwartz says on the panel. “It’s so natural to us at Houston Methodist to say, ‘please come along and see the opportunities there are and seize them.’”

The panelists noted on where the conversation was taking place — TAMU's new EnMed building, which was constructed and dedicated to engineering medical students. Dr. Pettigrew says the new field is meant to train problem solvers.

“When you consider scientific progress throughout history and in the future, you realize that technological innovation is the engine of scientific progress,” he says. “When you think about what profession in our society solves problems for the benefit of society, it’s engineering."

The full panel recording is available on this week's Houston Innovators Podcast. Listen to it below — or wherever you stream your podcasts — and subscribe for weekly episodes.



Photo courtesy of Houston Methodist

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Asma Mirza joins the Houston Innovators Podcast to explain how a pandemic pivot turned into a global health opportunity. Photo courtesy

In the span of a couple years, a Houston startup went from innovating a way for patients with degenerative eye diseases to see better to creating a portable and affordable breath-based diagnostics tool worthy of a prestigious grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates foundation.

Steradian Technologies, founded in 2018, set out to create human super-sight via proprietary optics. In early 2020, the company was getting ready to start testing the device and fundraising. Then, the pandemic hit, knocking the company completely off course.

Co-founder and CEO of the company, Asma Mirza, says on this week's Houston Innovators Podcast that the Steradian co-founders discussed how their optic technology could detect diseases. Something just clicked, and the RUMI device was born.

"We are from Houston, Texas, which is one of the most diverse and accessible cities in the country, and we were having trouble with basic diagnostic accessibility. It was taking too long, it was complicated, and people were getting sick and didn't know if they were positive or negative," Mirza says on the show. "That's when we pivoted the company and decided we were going to pivot the company and use optics to detect diseases in breath."

Fast forward two years and the company has been recognized by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation with a grant to sport the development of the tool — which costs about the same price as a latte to make. The impact for global health is huge, Mirza says, allowing for people to test their breath for diseases from their own homes in the same time it takes to take your temperature.

"You blow into a cartrige and we're able to take the air from your breath into a liquid sample," Mirza says, explaining how the device uses photons to produce quick results. "It's wild that we still don't have something like that yet."

She shares more details about the grant and the future applications for the technology — as well as the role Houston and local organizations have had on the company — on the podcast. Listen to the interview below — or wherever you stream your podcasts — and subscribe for weekly episodes.


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