On Demand

Houston startup connects the dots between contract nurses and medical facilities

Houston-based NurseDash is the Uber of staffing nursing shifts in medical facilities. Photo via nursedash.com

It's no secret that there's a shortage of nurses nationwide — and in Houston, the situation is no different. As baby boomers reach old age, the need for healthcare is only becoming more dire. Most facilities see a turnover rate of between 30 and 180 percent among nurses, leaving jobs open and shifts in need of being covered. Ideal staffing is a 5:1 patient-to-nurse ratio, but many sites are getting by with more like 8:1.

The solution for most healthcare facilities, whether they're hospitals, doctors offices or nursing homes, is to contact agencies to fill those spots. But agencies charge a high percentage for placement and lack transparency, says Andy Chen, former CFO for Nobilis Health Corporation. That's why he and Jakob Kohl created their app, NurseDash.

"Historically, some local agencies will promise you that they'll have somebody for you at 7 a.m. tomorrow, then start calling their people. They promise they'll send somebody, but they don't even know who it is," says Chen.

"The other thing is [facilities] would typically call multiple agencies so you're kind of on the hook with first-come-first-serve basis. And they were incentivized to say, 'Yes I've got somebody for you,' then find the person rather than finding the right candidate for that particular shift," adds Kohl, a principal at Everwise Healthcare and an attorney.

The two men were convinced that they could do better. They wanted to make sure that high-quality, accredited nurses could match with the medical sites where they were the perfect fit, for shifts that worked for both of them. NurseDash is the platform that makes the idea a reality.

NurseDash launched in 2017 and is the product of Belgian designers and developers in Russia. The project manager for the app is in New York, but official headquarters in Houston's Galleria area, where a staff of five works with the team spread out around the world.

Since its debut, NurseDash has attracted 40 facilities in Houston, including hospitals, surgery centers, and senior living, and about 400 nurses. Chen says he isn't sure just what to call his technology yet, but compares it to the ride hailing of Uber or Lyft and calls it "a virtual bulletin board."

The healthcare site posts shifts that it needs to fill. Nurses who fit the requirements see the availability and can choose what suits their schedules, then apply within the app. Everything takes place within the app, including payment and asking questions about the job. Nurses have already been vetted before they're able to apply, with comprehensive credentialing including license checks and drug screenings. The percentage that NurseDash takes from the transaction is about 30 percent less than an agency would take, says Kohl.

It's clear why medical facilities need such a service, but how does it benefit the nurses? It depends on where they are in their careers. Experienced nurses can pick up extra shifts on top of their full-time jobs, if they so desire. Practitioners returning to the game after having children can find times that work with their busy schedules. And fledgling nurses can use the opportunities to get a foot in the door at hospitals where they'd like to work full-time someday.

"They can work on their schedule, on their terms," says Kohl.

NurseDash has already expanded beyond Houston to northeast Ohio, which the founders say has a similar competitive dynamic to the Houston market. The next goal is to hit the rest of the top 10 largest cities in the United States. The next markets, says Kohl, will roll out at the request of major hospitals with locations both in Houston and those other cities. Ultimately, the goal is to become the go-to marketplace for nurses across the country. One shift at a time, NurseDash is making healthcare better.

Trending News

Building Houston

 
 

As the new UH medical school welcomes its second class, it's also planning for a new facility to support low-cost care. Photo via UH.edu

The University of Houston College of Medicine has announced it will open a low-cost health care facility thanks to a $1 million gift from The Cullen Trust for Health Care.

UHCOM will open the direct primary care clinic on the campus of Memorial Hermann Southwest Hospital, and, according to a news release from UH, it's only just the beginning of a network of clinics focused on treating those without health insurance.

"A direct primary care practice will add value to the local health care ecosystem by tackling one of the most pressing problems of our city: the lack of a comprehensive primary care system for the uninsured," says UH President Renu Khator in the release. "The Cullen Trust for Health Care shares our commitment to improving the overall health and health care of the population of Greater Houston and we are grateful for their support."

The direct primary care, or DPC, model is an alternative to insurance-based and fee-based care and eliminates third party payers. Instead, patients pay a monthly membership to receive primary care services — including telehealth, basic office procedures, at-cost laboratory testing, and access to medications at reduced prices. The clinic will offer same-day or next-day appointments as a guarantee and be staffed by faculty physicians and UH health professions students.

"The UH College of Medicine wants to restore primary care as the foundation of health care. We have developed a model with strong incentives to innovate the delivery of primary care designed to improve quality and more effectively control the cost of care," says Dr. Stephen Spann, founding dean of the UH College of Medicine, in the release. "We are building our model upon the four pillars of access, population health, social determinants of health and trusting relationships. In this framework, the physician is accountable for the health of their member panel and will demonstrate long-term cost and quality outcomes."

Dr. Stephen Spann is the founding dean of the UH College of Medicine. Photo via UH.edu

Founded in 2020, UHCOM's brief existence has been supported by generous donors – including a foundational $50 million gift as well as an endowment. This latest funding is from The Cullen Trust for Health Care — established in 1978 as an organization that grants financial assistance to institutions providing health care services in the Greater Houston area.

"The Cullen Trust for Health Care is proud to support this pilot endeavoring to bring a new form of patient-centered primary care to Houston's underserved communities. We are hopeful that the new UH College of Medicine direct primary care clinic will proactively engage patients to increase utilization and improve continuity of care," says Cullen Geiselman, chairman of the board for The Cullen Trust for Health Care.

This week, the school also announced its second-ever class of students. The UHCOM class of 2025 includes 30 students selected out of about 6,000 applicants. According to a news release, more than half of the second cohort received a $100,000 four-year scholarship. The future doctors will be celebrated with a White Coat Ceremony on Saturday, July 31, at the Hilton University of Houston.

More than half — 67 percent — of the new class is female and 60 percent of the group are Black or Hispanic. Sixty-three percent represent low socioeconomic status (as defined by Texas Medical Dental Schools Application Services).

Trending News