Space city news

New flight simulator and training facility to land at Houston Spaceport

The new center will replace the current Houston Learning Center that opened in 1976. Image courtesy of FlightSafety

A New York-based aviation company has announced plans for a Houston training center at Ellington Airport and the Houston Spaceport. Construction is scheduled to begin in the spring.

FlightSafety International, which has training facilities around the world and provides over 1.4 million hours of aviation training each year, announced the new state-of-the-art Learning Center in Houston on October 21, but the company has long been connected to Houston. It hosts its annual Wings Over Houston Airshow from the airport currently.

"FlightSafety is proud to have been a member of the Houston business community since 1966. This new facility will replace the current Houston Learning Center, which opened in 1976," says David Davenport, president and CEO of the company, in a news release. "We appreciate the support received from the City of Houston for this new facility as we worked to develop and finalize a long-term ground lease agreement for a six acre area within Phase 1 of the Spaceport."

The Learning Center will have a dozen full flight simulators for various types of aircraft that can be used for training for everyone from pilots and flight attendants to aircraft maintenance technicians. According to the release, there will be a dedicated area for Pratt & Whitney Canada engines.

Along with the training center, FlightSafety announced an agreement it's entered into with an unidentified large commercial aircraft operator that will use a large portion of the facility.

"This agreement further demonstrates FlightSafety's ability to provide turnkey training services to commercial aircraft operators in facilities that meet their exact needs," added David Davenport.

KBR signed a Space Act Agreement with NASA's Johnson Space Center to provide private astronaut training in NASA facilities. Photo via NASA.gov

For 60 years, Houston-based KBR has supported NASA's astronauts. Now, though a recently signed Space Act Agreement, KBR will also be providing its human spaceflight operation services to commercial companies.

"KBR has pioneered space travel for more than half a century. We will leverage our domain expertise to assist private astronauts with their human spaceflight activities," says Stuart Bradie, KBR President and CEO, in a news release.

The arrangement will include KBR training private astronauts on NASA property — it's the only agreement of its kind. KBR will train for space tasks like operating onboard of the International Space Station, routine operational tasks, health and performance checks, responding to emergencies, and more.

"This historic agreement is a testament to KBR's long standing partnership with NASA. We will continue to work together to propel NASA's mission to fuel a low-Earth orbit economy and advance the future of commercial space," Bradie continues in the release.

Earlier this week, Axiom Space, a Houston-based space tech startup, announced it was selected to design a commercial space flight habitat to be attached to the ISS. KBR is among Axiom's professional partners on the project.

Image---Axiom-modules-connected-to-ISS KBR is one of Axiom Space's partners on its new NASA-sanctioned ISS project. Photo via AxiomSpace.com

The Axiom project includes plans to replace the ISS with a commercially operated space station. The targeted launch date for the commercial destination module is set for late 2024.

Both the Axiom and KBR agreements with NASA are in line with a shift toward commercialization within the space industry. Last June, NASA released its plan to introduce marketing and commercial opportunities to the ISS — with financial expense being a main factory.

"The agency's ultimate goal in low-Earth orbit is to partner with industry to achieve a strong ecosystem in which NASA is one of many customers purchasing services and capabilities at lower cost," reads the release online.

In an interview with InnovationMap last July, NASA Technology Transfer Strategist Steven Gonzalez explains that opening up the space industry to commercial opportunities allows for NASA to focus on research. The government agency doesn't need to worry about a return on investment, like commercial entities have to.

"With the commercial market now, people keep talking about it being a competition, but in reality we need one another," Gonzalez says. "We have 60 years of history that they can stand on and they are doing things differently that we're learning from."