hi, tech

Houston hospital taps health tech company for remote monitoring and analytics partnership

Houston Methodist has entered into an agreement with a medical device company. Photo via globenewswire.com

A Houston health care system has announced a new partnership with a medical device company that specializes in continuous health monitoring and clinical intelligence.

Houston Methodist and Colorado-based BioIntelliSense announced a new collaboration to advance remote monitoring and analytics from in-hospital to at-home. BioIntelliSense’s technology includes its FDA-cleared BioSticker and medical grade BioButton. The two devices are wearable and, when paired with algorithmic-based data services, the technologies enable remote data capture and continuous monitoring of over 20 biometrics — up to 1,440 sets of vital sign measurements daily —for up to 30 days on a single device.

“This new strategic collaboration with BioIntelliSense exemplifies Houston Methodist’s continued commitment to advancing world-class expertise and greater efficiency to deliver the highest quality and most impactful care,” says Dr. Sarah Pletcher, vice president and executive medical director of strategic innovation at Houston Methodist, in a news release. “This collaboration keeps the patient at the center as we continue to maximize our leadership in healthcare innovation.”

The two entities executed Memorandum of Understanding that identifies several areas of strategic focus for improving patient care, increasing clinical workflow efficiencies, and reducing the burden on healthcare systems. BioIntelliSense and Houston Methodist will work together to develop a state-of-the-art virtual care control center at Houston Methodist.

“Data-driven remote patient monitoring that is simple, clinically accurate, and cost-effective, is the future of healthcare delivery,” says James Mault, MD, Founder and CEO of BioIntelliSense. “We are proud to work alongside our partners at Houston Methodist to pioneer a continuous care model that provides actionable data and clinical intelligence to enable our overburdened healthcare workforce take better care of patients in any care setting.”

According to the news release, the MOU further establishes the use of leading biosensor technology and the development of advanced algorithms, care models, and data analytics for monitoring and treating a range of complex conditions spanning heart and vascular, orthopedics, oncology, infectious diseases, transplants, and others.

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Building Houston

 
 

Houston scored high marks for food, culture, and diversity. Photo viaIdeasLaboratory.com

At least according to one new report, Houston is not only the Energy Capital of the World but also the livability capital of Texas.

A new study from Best Cities, powered by Resonance Consultancy, puts Houston at No. 11 among the best cities in the U.S. That’s the top showing among the six Texas cities included in the ranking. Houston appeared at No. 17 on last year’s list.

“Educated, diverse and hard-working, Houston is America’s stealthy powerhouse on the rise,” Best Cities proclaims.

Best Cities notes that while Austin grabs much of the best-city attention, “the promise of the Lone Star State drawing Californians and New Yorkers is quietly being fulfilled in Houston.” The website points out that the Houston metro area has gained nearly 300,000 residents in the past year, thanks to both domestic and international migration.

Here are some of the individual rankings that contribute to Houston’s 11th-place finish:

  • No. 4 for restaurants
  • No. 7 for culture
  • No. 8 for foreign-born population

“Houston is a diverse and vibrant metro where individuals can start a family, grow their business, attend world-class institutions and universities, or be immersed in the 145 languages that are spoken by our residents,” Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner says in a news release. “The quality of life we have in Houston is second to none, and the data we receive from placements such as … Best Cities further reaffirm the strength and resiliency that has come to define this great city of ours.”

A few spots behind Houston on the Best Cities list are No. 14 Dallas and No. 15 Austin.

What lifts Dallas to the No. 14 spot? These are some of the factors cited by Best Cities:

  • Location of more than 10,000 corporate headquarters
  • Strong showing (No. 2) in the airport connectivity category
  • Kudos for the soon-to-be-expanded Kay Bailey Hutchinson Convention Center Dallas
  • Home of the country’s sixth largest LGBTQ+ community
  • Presence of the 28-block, 68-acre Dallas Arts District

Austin comes in at No. 15, one notch behind Dallas.

Best Cities praises Austin as “a place that’s incredibly livable. Talk to any entrepreneur leaving Silicon Valley or Seattle and chances are they’ve considered Austin.”

The website points to a number of Austin’s assets, such as:

  • Growing presence of Fortune 500 headquarters
  • Comparatively low unemployment rate
  • Location of the University of Texas’ flagship campus
  • Status as the Live Music Capital of the World
  • Home of the annual SXSW gathering

Two other Texas cities make the Best Cities list: No. 34 San Antonio and No. 94 McAllen.

Best Cities bases its list of the best U.S. cities on Resonance Consultancy’s combination of statistical performance plus qualitative evaluations by locals and visitors. Those figures are grouped into six main categories. This year’s ranking features 100 U.S. cities. To come up with the ranking, Resonance Consultancy assessed all U.S. metro areas with at least 500,000 residents.

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This article originally ran on CultureMap.

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