hi, tech

Houston hospital taps health tech company for remote monitoring and analytics partnership

Houston Methodist has entered into an agreement with a medical device company. Photo via globenewswire.com

A Houston health care system has announced a new partnership with a medical device company that specializes in continuous health monitoring and clinical intelligence.

Houston Methodist and Colorado-based BioIntelliSense announced a new collaboration to advance remote monitoring and analytics from in-hospital to at-home. BioIntelliSense’s technology includes its FDA-cleared BioSticker and medical grade BioButton. The two devices are wearable and, when paired with algorithmic-based data services, the technologies enable remote data capture and continuous monitoring of over 20 biometrics — up to 1,440 sets of vital sign measurements daily —for up to 30 days on a single device.

“This new strategic collaboration with BioIntelliSense exemplifies Houston Methodist’s continued commitment to advancing world-class expertise and greater efficiency to deliver the highest quality and most impactful care,” says Dr. Sarah Pletcher, vice president and executive medical director of strategic innovation at Houston Methodist, in a news release. “This collaboration keeps the patient at the center as we continue to maximize our leadership in healthcare innovation.”

The two entities executed Memorandum of Understanding that identifies several areas of strategic focus for improving patient care, increasing clinical workflow efficiencies, and reducing the burden on healthcare systems. BioIntelliSense and Houston Methodist will work together to develop a state-of-the-art virtual care control center at Houston Methodist.

“Data-driven remote patient monitoring that is simple, clinically accurate, and cost-effective, is the future of healthcare delivery,” says James Mault, MD, Founder and CEO of BioIntelliSense. “We are proud to work alongside our partners at Houston Methodist to pioneer a continuous care model that provides actionable data and clinical intelligence to enable our overburdened healthcare workforce take better care of patients in any care setting.”

According to the news release, the MOU further establishes the use of leading biosensor technology and the development of advanced algorithms, care models, and data analytics for monitoring and treating a range of complex conditions spanning heart and vascular, orthopedics, oncology, infectious diseases, transplants, and others.

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Building Houston

 
 

You can now hop online and invest in this promising cell therapy startup. Photo via Getty Images

A clinical-stage company headquartered in Houston has opened an online funding campaign.

FibroBiologics, which is developing fibroblast cell-based therapeutics for chronic diseases, launched a campaign with equity crowdfunding platform StartEngine. The platform lets anyone — regardless of their net worth or income level — to invest in securities issued by startups.

The funding, according to a press release, will be used to support ongoing operations of Fibrobiologics and advance its clinical programs in multiple sclerosis, degenerative disc disease, wound care, extension of life, and cancer.

"We're excited to partner with StartEngine on this campaign. StartEngine has over 600,000 investors as part of their community and has raised over half a billion dollars for its clients," says FibroBiologics' Founder and CEO Pete O'Heeron, in the release.

"This is an exciting time at FibroBiologics as we continue progressing our clinical pipeline and developing innovative therapies to treat chronic diseases," he continues. "This new funding will fuel our growth in the lab and bring us one step closer to commercialization."

The campaign, launched this week, already has over 100 investors, at the time of publication, and has raised nearly $2 million, according to the page. The minimum investment is set at around $500, and the company's indicated valuation is $252.57 million.

In 2021, FibroBiologics announced its intention of going public. Last year, O'Heeron told InnovationMap on the Houston Innovators Podcast of the company's growth plans as well as the specifics of the technology.

Only two types of cells — stem cells and fibroblasts — can be used in cell therapy for a regenerative treatment, which is when specialists take healthy cells from a patient and inject them into a part of the body that needs it the most. As O'Heeron explains in the podcast, fibroblasts can do it more effectively and cheaper than stem cells.

"(Fibroblasts) can essentially do everything a stem cell can do, only they can do it better," says O'Heeron. "We've done tests in the lab and we've seen them outperform stem cells by a low of 50 percent to a high of about 220 percent on different disease paths."


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