Energizing plans

Houston energy storage software company inks major deal with Canadian tech co.

Houston-based Pason Power just inked a major deal that's giving it an edge in the industry. Getty Images

Houston-based Pason Power, which provides Internet of Things services to energy storage and solar providers, has been quietly innovating in the energy industry for years. And earlier this year, Pason Power inked a partnership with a multimillion-dollar energy tech company that's quickly expanding its US footprint.

Since it launched as a wholly owned subsidiary of Calgary-based Pason Systems Inc. in 2016, Pason Power offers an array of technologies — including AI, IoT, real-time automation — that support energy storage systems throughout a project's lifecycle. Energy storage systems is a wide umbrella that includes everything from the massive systems used to store renewable energy and biofuels, to household batteries, which store electricity.

"We have intelligent energy management system, which is an intelligent brain that sits inside an energy storage system," says Enrico Ladendorf, founder and managing partner of Pason Power. "We have this intelligent, fully-autonomous system that knows the physical operation of (energy storage), and it makes it brain-dead simple."

Pason's latest deal is one that'll help it continue to expand into the U.S. and Canadian markets. The company's iEMS, or intelligent energy management system, was chosen to service Eguana Technologies, a large Canadian energy storage company that reported $2.8 million in 2018 revenue, per the company's public filings, and $7 million in sales in 2018.

The deal arose from Pason Power's history with Eguana Technologies. A member of Pason Systems' leadership team has known one of Eguana's founders, Brent Harris, for more than 20 years.

"When (Pason Power) got into new ventures, and we were looking into renewables, we talked to Brent," Ladendorf says. Ladendorf adds that the companies Eguana was working with were "not very good," and that there weren't a lot of alternatives in the space.

Ladendorf declined to provide financial details associated with the deal, but said Pason Power is continuing to growing its footprint in the commercial energy sector.

"The opportunity is quite large," Ladendorf says.

Ninety five percent of the drilling rigs that Pason Systems services are in Canada, Ladendorf says, but its U.S. business is its most profitable.

"We have a huge presence (in Canada)," Ladendorf says of Pason Systems. "We are the highest market-cap oilfield services company on the Toronto stock exchange."

As of press time, shares of Pason Systems Inc. were trading at $19.97, down $0.34 from the market's opening.

Enrico Ladendorf is the founder and managing partner of Houston-based Pason Power.Courtesy of Pason Power

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Building Houston

 
 

Kyle Judah is executive director of Rice University's Liu Idea Lab for Innovation & Entrepreneurship. Photo courtesy of Lilie

When Kyle Judah accepted his position as executive director at Rice University's Liu Idea Lab for Innovation & Entrepreneurship, he had spent less than 48 hours in the city of Houston. In fact, his first two months in the role have been spent completely remote and out of town.

Still, his limited in-person interaction with the city and with Rice made an impact.

"One of the things I found so exciting about what's going on in Houston right now that, quite frankly, was incredibly attractive about the opportunity to come and join Lilie and Rice was that Houston has these big pillar companies in energy and health care and all these critical areas that the world, the economy, and the society needs," Judah says on the Houston Innovators Podcast. "That's all in Houston right now."

Judah and Lilie's goal is to help identify the innovation happening on campus at Rice and bring it to the world. And, he says, Rice as a whole has a huge place in the greater Houston innovation ecosystem. The challenge is identifying what industries Houston and Rice have an opportunity to disrupt.

"We can't just copy and paste what works for the Bay Area or what works for Boston," he says. "We have to figure out what is going to be the authentic right sort of centers of excellence for Rice and for Houston — areas like energy, health care, space. It just so happens that these areas that Houston and Rice have historically done better at than anyone else — those happen to be the most grand challenges for all of humanity."

Another priority Judah has leading Lilie, which was founded at Rice in 2015, is to make sure opportunities are available for everyone. This month, the university launched the Rice Experiment Fund — a $500 semesterly stipend available to all students. The funds are meant to be used on early market testing and experiments, which can be prohibitive obstacles for students.

"We want to make sure that the diversity of entrepreneurship at Rice speaks to the diversity of the city in our backyard," says Judah, adding that diversity and inclusion is at the top of mind for programs like this.

Judah shares more on where he plans to lead Lilie and his early impressions on Houston's startup scene in the podcast episode. Overall, he's found it extremely welcoming.

"I found that everyone here wants Houston to win," he says. "We're really playing as a broader collective, and that's incredibly special."

You can listen to the full interview below — or wherever you stream your podcasts — and subscribe for weekly episodes.


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