Energizing plans

Houston energy storage software company inks major deal with Canadian tech co.

Houston-based Pason Power just inked a major deal that's giving it an edge in the industry. Getty Images

Houston-based Pason Power, which provides Internet of Things services to energy storage and solar providers, has been quietly innovating in the energy industry for years. And earlier this year, Pason Power inked a partnership with a multimillion-dollar energy tech company that's quickly expanding its US footprint.

Since it launched as a wholly owned subsidiary of Calgary-based Pason Systems Inc. in 2016, Pason Power offers an array of technologies — including AI, IoT, real-time automation — that support energy storage systems throughout a project's lifecycle. Energy storage systems is a wide umbrella that includes everything from the massive systems used to store renewable energy and biofuels, to household batteries, which store electricity.

"We have intelligent energy management system, which is an intelligent brain that sits inside an energy storage system," says Enrico Ladendorf, founder and managing partner of Pason Power. "We have this intelligent, fully-autonomous system that knows the physical operation of (energy storage), and it makes it brain-dead simple."

Pason's latest deal is one that'll help it continue to expand into the U.S. and Canadian markets. The company's iEMS, or intelligent energy management system, was chosen to service Eguana Technologies, a large Canadian energy storage company that reported $2.8 million in 2018 revenue, per the company's public filings, and $7 million in sales in 2018.

The deal arose from Pason Power's history with Eguana Technologies. A member of Pason Systems' leadership team has known one of Eguana's founders, Brent Harris, for more than 20 years.

"When (Pason Power) got into new ventures, and we were looking into renewables, we talked to Brent," Ladendorf says. Ladendorf adds that the companies Eguana was working with were "not very good," and that there weren't a lot of alternatives in the space.

Ladendorf declined to provide financial details associated with the deal, but said Pason Power is continuing to growing its footprint in the commercial energy sector.

"The opportunity is quite large," Ladendorf says.

Ninety five percent of the drilling rigs that Pason Systems services are in Canada, Ladendorf says, but its U.S. business is its most profitable.

"We have a huge presence (in Canada)," Ladendorf says of Pason Systems. "We are the highest market-cap oilfield services company on the Toronto stock exchange."

As of press time, shares of Pason Systems Inc. were trading at $19.97, down $0.34 from the market's opening.

Enrico Ladendorf is the founder and managing partner of Houston-based Pason Power.Courtesy of Pason Power

From Rex Tillerson's thoughts on leadership and politics to Houston's role in the low-carbon energy movement, check out these powerful quotes from the 2020 KPMG Global Energy Conference. Getty Images

As the energy capital of the world, Houston can't get complacent. The oil and gas industry is changing — carbon is out and finding clean energy alternatives is in.

At the 2020 KPMG Global Energy Conference on June 5 and 6, hundreds of energy professionals listened to the O&G elite — even including former Secretary of State and former ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson — give their two cents about the revolution. Day two of the conference featured the Houston Low Carbon Energy Climate Summit by the Center for Houston's Future.

In case you missed it, here are a few powerful quotes from both days of the program — from Houston's role in the low-carbon energy movement to Tillerson's leadership expertise.

"Texas is one of those places where you can just get stuff done.”

— Cindy Yeilding, senior vice president at BP, says Texans are willing to collaborate on this. In the "Visions of our Energy Future" panel during the Low Carbon Energy Summit on Thursday, June 6, she predicted Houston will be a net zero carbon city by 2040 or 2035.

“One of the things we need to focus on is being able to attract and retain talent.”

— Mary Anne Brelinsky, CEO of EDF Trading, stressing the importance of talent in the effort to keep Houston the energy capital of the world. Brelinsky advocated for corporations and its execs getting involved with local universities. "We're competing against Silicon Valley," she says in the panel.

"You’ve got the source, and you’ve got the sinks. … Houston is going to be one of our focal points.”

— Charlene Olivia Russell, vice president of Low Carbon Strategies at Oxy, on how Houston is set up for success when it comes to staying as a power player in the global low carbon energy platform, but, during the panel, she emphasizes collaboration needs to continue happening.

“When Shell agreed to sponsor this summit, it was pitched as a climate change summit. It was changed to a low-carbon summit because some people in this room are uncomfortable with the phrase 'climate change.'"

— Jason Klein, vice president of U.S. Energy Transition Strategy at Shell, says at the "Energy Transformations" panel during the Low Carbon Energy Summit on Thursday, June 6.

"If we want to be the leader and the energy capital of the world, we need to attract talent, capital investment, and innovation, and if the people are going to do those things think that we don’t even like to talk about those things, then they aren’t going to come here — they’re going to go to San Francisco.”

— Klein continues. The audience responded with a round of applause.

“I think it is important as Americans to remember that our greatest strength and the most important element to our national security has been that we are a nation that has many allies and friends. Our adversaries — Russia, China, North Korea, Iran — have no allies or friends.”

— Former Secretary of State Rex Tillerson who served as CEO of ExxonMobil from 2006 to 2016. Tillerson discussed a wide range of topics on Wednesday, June 5, at the 2020 KPMG Global Energy Conference in his fireside chat with Regina Mayor, global sector head and U.S. national sector leader of energy and natural resources at KPMG US. Click here to watch the full interview.

“We’re all a work in progress. You’re never done. I’m not done — I’m still a work in progress. If you have that view and you have that set of values that are never going to change … [then] I can keep developing as a human being.”

— Tillerson says of leadership lessons learned. He's an avid proponent of the Boy Scouts of America organization, and cited many valuable lessons he's learned about himself and about leading people from his involvement in the nonprofit.